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NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 7, No. 7, July 1979
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NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 7, No. 7, July 1979 - Page 5. July 1979. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 22, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/94/show/85.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(July 1979). NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 7, No. 7, July 1979 - Page 5. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/94/show/85

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 7, No. 7, July 1979 - Page 5, July 1979, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 22, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/94/show/85.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 7, No. 7, July 1979
Publisher National Organization for Women, Bay Area Chapter
Date July 1979
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • National Organization for Women
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location HQ1101 .N682
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332563~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 5
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File Name femin_201109_387e.jpg
Transcript ; A common male method of taking charge of a conversa- "tion is to simply interrupt. Sociologists at UC Santa Bar* bara analyzed spontaneous student conversations on cam- .pus and found that the men students interrupt women far more than they interrupt other men, and more than worn-, en interrupt either men or women. The Santa Barbara- team tested the results by monitoring conversations be* tween students who weren't acquainted to see if the extra politeness expected among strangers might change the way men talked to women. It didn't. A different type of «tudy found that men dominate the subjects of conversations, and that women do more of the "work"—such as asking interesting questions—to keep a. conversation going. • Sociologist Pamela Fishman recorded hours of naturally occurring conversations in the homes of couples (with permission) and found that while women initiated 62% of\ the topics of conversation, .their topics succeeded (were developed in further conversation between the partners): ' only 36% of the time. Topics introduced by the men sue-' ceeded 96% df the time. % ;• n The women used these strategies not only in their "turn" but also to further the conversational topics started by men. i Another researcher, Robin Lakoff, a linguist, says women's lack of power is reflected in their speech, different enough from the way men talk to be almost a different dialect—a "genderlect." This includes use of empty adjectives like "lovely," ending declarative statements with questioning intonations and hedging with expressions like "sort of" and "I guess." . Other studies have confirmed this women's language and suggest it is connected with powerless roles—for example, in one study, policewomen did not speak "women's language"—and may actually help to perpetuate women's lack of power. Men or women who use this less-direct, tentative style of speech have less credibility, one study suggests—they are less likely to be believed by juries, less able to get jobs requiring authoritative speech, such as television news broadcasting. ™a TO&AUQGratD Not only avoid traveling in unratified states (and thereby withhold your money from them), let the Governor know why you are avoiding their states. Also clip ads from newspapers and magazines painting the glories of such a state and send the ad to the travel agency, Chamber of Commerce, whoever generated it and enclose a note saying why you refuse to visit that state. Maybe there will be enough pressure on state legislatures from the economic sector to exert some influence on the side of justice. Cont.-Marj Randal Feminism: a columnist catches on Cont.-T. Butler By Sydney Harris I suspect that the fuel that has fanned the flames of feminism in America has been less the social and economic inequities suffered by woman ���- real and prevalent as they have been — than the simple, pervasive and infuriating fact that the bulk of men are insufferably clumsy in their confrontations with the other sex. It is an easy assumption made by most men that, while they may not understand women, women do not understand them, either — and, thus, that there is a mutually unexplored terrain that separates them. I do not believe this. If we have learned anything from the new field of social psychology, it is that minority groups of any kind have a greater awareness of the strengths and weaknesses of their masters than their masters have of them. Dominance makes a ruling group stupid. It does not matter where you look. Servants have a shrewder perception about their employ^ ers than vice versa; blacks have been forced to grasp the inner dynamics of whites, purely as a matter of survival, more than the whites have ever bothered to do the same. Women, being also a minority group —- socially if not numerically — I ^adto^v2elop a "survival sense" about their male masters. I don't believe in something called woman's "intuition" (as George Jean Nathan said long ago, "Woman's famous intuition is oaly man's transparency"), but she does possess an insight into men's motives and moods that ae utterly* fails to reciprocate, being content to label her an "enigma." Because of this disparity in perception, men drive women up the wall with a repertoire of behavior and responses that corresponds only to x what men imagine women are like, and not to what they really are. The male has set up an image of the "female" and women by now are simply refusing to live up, or live down, to this uncomfortable distortion of reality. What the whole spate of recent feminist' books has been saying is that women will no longer put up with the traditional masculine attitudes — which are, to name but a few of the most prominent: condescending, patronizing, whimsical, heavily jocular, stereotypical, sexually demeaning and grossly insensitive to real generic similarities. It is less, I believe, an economic and social revolt, than an erupting psychological one. It is her personhood she is proclaiming, not her independence.