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Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 4, No. 1, December 1978 - January 1979
Page 19
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Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 4, No. 1, December 1978 - January 1979 - Page 19. December 1978 - January 1979. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 8, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/884/show/874.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(December 1978 - January 1979). Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 4, No. 1, December 1978 - January 1979 - Page 19. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/884/show/874

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 4, No. 1, December 1978 - January 1979 - Page 19, December 1978 - January 1979, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 8, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/884/show/874.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 4, No. 1, December 1978 - January 1979
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date December 1978 - January 1979
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 19
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  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_546ar.jpg
Transcript oak. I might consider the place boring if I didn't know about the intermittent streams. The bed of Mescal Creek is smooth sculpted limestone with huge boulders strewn about. Its moisture supports large sycamores, pecan trees, maidenhair fern and columbine in bloom. Honey bees nuzzle nectar, ticks are out in force, and daddy-long-legged spiders huddle in quavering clumps. Along the sandy banks of the Pedernales River, huge cypress trees grow with shaggy bark, and debris from raging floods has caught high among their burn in cut-offs by day. Chihuahuan desert scrub dominates the lowlands—tar- bush and creosote, with purple sage, ocotillo, yucca, cacti and lechugilla. A steppe up is sotol with grasses that gives way to upland forested with a pine-oak- juniper association, some Texas madrones, century plants and drooping juniper. Off-trail hiking in these mountains is steep, strenuous and tough-going. Prickly, spiney things are all over, and loose broken rock is everywhere. There's nothing to grab hold of and nothing to because there's a lot of Texas f The East Texas Piney Woods. Rolling hills here are forested with an oak-pine- hickory on fairly acidic, sandy soil, and the climate is subtropical and humid with 48 inches of rain annually. I hike here in early April. It's warm enough for cut-offs, and, yes, there are mosquitoes at this time of year. I break trail for a while (clear away the spider webs), then drop behind my companions and hike solo, making notes at my own pace. No doubt. It's spring: scattered dogwood blossoms layered in colors on the moist earth, black berry bushes flowering in sunny clearings; while pollen covers my boots with a green patina. The only rocks here are small rounded ones in intermittent stream beds, the soil is loose, sandy and dark with humus. I scuff through downed oak leaves and heavier magnolia, slide on slippery pine needles. I cross meandering streams under arches of vining yellow blossoms, wind through bowers of lianas with pale green tufts of new grass at their feet. Huge oaks with bare trunks flourishing with growth where the tree tops see sunlight, and bamboo shoots rise knee-high on damp, low-lying ground. There are armadillo scratchings in sandy soil, woodpecker-riddled tree trunks, turquiose-and- orange-winged black velvet butterflies. I see bouquets of purple long-stemmed flowers, shaded airy creek banks green as improved pasture, clusters of white flowers on tall stalks, resurrection fern in tree notches, and finally, telephone lines. The highway. The hill country of central Texas. The area is subtropical, but has frequent steppe (dry) years and an occasional desert (very dry) year. Rainfall averages 341/2 inches and altitude ranges from 800-1850 feet. The soil, laid down as limestone in the Guadalupe Sea, is poor and shallow and fairly alkaline, so most of the Edward's Plateau is used for livestock grazing. I hike here in late April, and, though it's overcast with no direct sun, the heat feels like mid-summer. The trail is rocky and hilly but it begins to be a bit monotonous seeing only juniper and scrub branches. The river and its tributaries dissect the original plateau, leaving concordant hills behind—and unexplored terrain I'll hike when I'm here again. Big Bend in West Texas. Altitude ranges from 1,700-7,000 feet and rainfall averages ISVz inches. I hike in the Chisos Mountains in mid-March, a few weeks before the desert blooms. Evenings are chilly enough for sweaters but you sun- fall on, so I'm cautious of my balance and footing. Neither is there much of a level unvegetated spot for a sleeping bag, and this is the night I'm tethered to a sotol. I spend my sleep time reading about hiking in the Grand Canyon solo, listening long to unfamiliar night sounds in that wide-open space, watching the half- moon set, free-associating, and watching the sky lighten. Morning brings bird sounds-a long trill repeated from high among the rocks, and a duck-like call from one overhead, then three, then sixteen, circling and soaring over air currents. Sunlight silhouettes the mountain edges of a rock-bounded world, then floods Juniper Canyon at my feet. These exposed igneous intrusions are like an island in a limestone sea of desert. I climb up to the ridge east of Casa Grande, avoiding the peregrine falcon nesting territory, and down again over more broken rock. The soil's darker with more humus under the trees of this wetter north slope. I thread my way through fallen pinon pine and blaze more trail downhill over steep talus slopes edged with juniper and Emory oak. It's all exhausting work, often dangerous and always a challenge! I know one thing for sure-I'll be at it again. (more on next page) DECEMBER/JANIJARY1979 HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH 19