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Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 4, No. 1, December 1978 - January 1979
Page 18
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Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 4, No. 1, December 1978 - January 1979 - Page 18. December 1978 - January 1979. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 10, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/884/show/873.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(December 1978 - January 1979). Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 4, No. 1, December 1978 - January 1979 - Page 18. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/884/show/873

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 4, No. 1, December 1978 - January 1979 - Page 18, December 1978 - January 1979, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 10, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/884/show/873.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 4, No. 1, December 1978 - January 1979
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date December 1978 - January 1979
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
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Title Page 18
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File Name femin_201109_546aq.jpg
Transcript Geographer - photographer - writer Nancy Landau shares some of her five years of backpacking experience with us in the form of anecdotes and field notes. She also provides us with the nuts and bolts: books to read, classes to take and expeditions to join in order to prepare for and enjoy the outdoors. courtesy ot North West Outward Bound School There's a lot of Texas to see by Nancy Landau Lone Star Trail Tale One. You leave the trail after a smooth solo hike, thinking of a hot bath and your next meal. You're ready to go home, but you can't—not without the car you left next to the country dumpster three days ago. It's no longer there. You trudge on to the nearest farm road hoping to find a phone, dreading the hitch-hike on 1-45, wondering if your insurance company will come through, mentally inventorying your losses (glad your camera's over your shoulder, sorry about what was stored in the trunk). The friendly local who delivers you to the Evergreen Grocery insists it's your boyfriend playing a joke on you. Some joke. (What boyfriend?) You're filing a stolen car report when his cousin the constable arrives saying, "Stolen? No, we jest towed it away.". Advice: Don't park anywhere near one of those roadside dumpsters. And don't expect much information from the local folks. Many are unaware that a 100- mile trail treks through their neck of the woods. Why would city folk come there anyway? Much less a woman hiking alone. Lone Star Trail Tale Two. You're driving the red dirt back roads in search of the trailhead and you notice a number of parked trucks with their gunracks-all empty. You dig for your reddest bandana, hike between the most flamboyantly colored backpacks and make lots of noise. Caution: it's Texas in mid-November and the deerhunters are out in force until December 31. In the national forests? Where people are hiking? Right. Longtime bird-watcher and concessionaire Grandpa Sweeny, who usually distributes trail maps at Double Lake, returns them to the ranger the opening day of hunting season, hoping to discourage folks from setting foot or backpack in the woods. ' ^TT-flir-^iT'" Other backpacking adventures from an expedition leader: a lost hiker who just happens to be the grandson of Leon Jaworski; flagging down a truck for a group ride back to a lost trail; pulling up tent stakes and heading for high ground when a distant air horn announces the river's rising—fast; tethering a sleeping bag to a neighboring sotol on a steep Chisos Mountain slope to keep from sliding off into the night. < Backpacking is something you could learn to live with-and love. Wilderness writer Edward Abbey says "Life is already too short to waste on speed . . . Walking makes the world much bigger and more interesting. You have time to observe the details." When a backpacker adopts an attitude of voluntary simplicity, lives efficiently with limited resources, there is time "to walk slowly, antennae spread", time to observe both the minute and the grandiose. To match what you know with what you see. To recognize flora in the leaf and fauna in the flesh, to experience directly the weather and climate that affect them. To learn juniper by its smell, read a river and explore its source, evaluate the edibility of stonecrop and dewberry, and know a bird by its song. You can develop your sense of direction by practical orientation with map and compass, and learn to visualize your topo map in 3-D by making direct comparisons with slope and contour. You can learn east by the rising of the moon, pull out a star chart to pick out constellation patterns, and get a" feel for universe dynamics. You can reach places inaccessible by other modes of travel and learn some things about being alone. In The Man Who Walked Through Time Colin Fletcher writes, "When you ferret out something for yourself piecing the clues together unaided, it remains for the rest of your life in some way truer than facts you are merely taught, and freer from onslaughts of doubt." Explore some of the Texas trails—this time of year is ideal-and record your discoveries in a journal. Here are my field notes on three areas I've explored over the years. 18 HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH DECEMBER/JANUARY 1979