Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 4, No. 1, December 1978 - January 1979
Page 17
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 4, No. 1, December 1978 - January 1979 - Page 17. December 1978 - January 1979. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 19, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/884/show/872.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(December 1978 - January 1979). Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 4, No. 1, December 1978 - January 1979 - Page 17. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/884/show/872

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 4, No. 1, December 1978 - January 1979 - Page 17, December 1978 - January 1979, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 19, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/884/show/872.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 4, No. 1, December 1978 - January 1979
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date December 1978 - January 1979
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 17
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_546ap.jpg
Transcript cPlant c1^6man by Gigi Yellen "The first thing I do each day is take care of my plants," says Toby Topek, an artist whose studio is a greenhouse and whose three children have dubbed her Plant Woman. "If I cannot work, if there are too many other responsibilities in a day, then I go out to the studio and I sit and daydream, and that's working. I look at what I've done." Last spring Topek decided to start sculpture but kept going back to her work in paper collage. "I couldn't find the forms for sculpture. I didn't know whether I had the energy to enter this new medium." Topek found the energy, and the results of the discovery are on display at the Roberto Molina Gallery, 243 7 V£ University. Along with her stone and porcelain sculptures are examples of her collage work—round forms in deep reds and earth tones. The same rolling forms appear in her sculpture pieces. Topek worked on her one-woman show over the summer months. "I work best in the summer," bu: learning the kiln she says, "nearly overwhelmed me." "I thought I would be able to get into these shapes right away, but it didn't work that way, and I got very frustrated. My assistant kept showing me different methods, and finally one, the slab method, worked. I found I could use my greenhouse shovels as slabs for the clay to harden on." The shape of the shovel is apparent in her sand-colored stone pieces—arranged on and beside a low platform in her current exhibit. Topek's soul-sister relationship with nature finds its three-dimen sional expression in her sculpture-"companion" pieces she named Earth Wave, Heat Wave, Desert Wave and Water Wave. They are simple, torso-like forms. Each piece consists of two interlocking units. Topek calls them "relationships." There is another sculpture group called Plant Woman. "This is me." The artist refers to the sculpture as "she." Plant Woman stretches out along the floor of the gallery in seven pieces. Accustomed to working in collage, Topek took small pieces of fired porcelain and arranged them to suggest a female form to convey "That feeling of, I'm lying down on the earth, wide open to the sunlight." She used to do nudes. She was very good at them. Then people who liked her drawings became disappointed that she was moving into other areas. She lets out a long sigh and tells why she stopped showing for a time. "Somehow I was really locked into what other people were expecting. I wasn't opening up. So I had a lot of really hard work to do." Her work was represented in a special exhibit of Houston women artists at last year's IWY conference but the current exhibition is her first major one in three years. "This doctor asked me, 'Are you still painting?' 'Yes,' I said. 'Are you still practicing medicine?'" Topeka titles her work using original names or borrowing words from Walt Whitman like Unfolded out of the Fold; Roots and Leaves Themselves Alone. She loves the earth, this woman of the porcelain forms and is inspired by naked hills as well as by lush ferns. She says, "I see the human body in all of nature." TAMARA de LEMPICKA continued from page 15 "Unaware of, and perhaps even scorning contemporary anarchistic trends, Tamara de Lempicka has found her place in the long line of true artists who have taken their inspiration at the sources of classical beauty, particularly from Cranach the Elder, to whom she owes her impeccable design. . . .She has constructed lasting work of great power and emotional impact." The French government seems to agree. In 1976, almost half a century after the Musee d'Art Moderne purchased its first Lempicka {Girl with Gloves), the government officially purchased twenty- three paintings by Lempicka "for the people of France." They are now hanging in museums throughout the country. Then, in 1977, came the Ricci book, and with it more notoriety. The book and the surrounding publicity treat Lempicka as though she no longer exists. She has been wrapped in a veil of mystery, projected as someone who has disappeared, who is unknown. "Unknown!" she rages. "Unknown to whom? To these nobodies only! I have never been unknown. I have always been painting. They have not always been looking. "I do not wish to live in souvenir. I am continuing everyday. My best painting I have not yet done. Every time I commence I am certain that this will be the greatest, and every time 1 finish I am disappointed." But people who have acquired her paintings, like Houston's Count and Countess de Warren, are not disappointed. As the Deco period is studied and its place in the context of twentieth century art recognized, works like Lempicka's will undoubtedly appreciate in value. Random handfuls of stars are scattered on the indigo Mexican sky. Black cloud shapes at the edges meet the mass of bare volcanic mountains to the north. The veranda is in darkness. The lighted pool glimmers watery blue, a giant, square-cut aquamarine. Tiny paper lanterns here and there glow yellow in the pine trees at the border of the garden. A breath of wind ruffles the bamboo, then twists through the lush, night-blooming jasmine. Around the far corner of the house, a single jarring light spills out from a sliding glass door ten feet high. She moves, adjusting the canvas slightly on her easel until the light strikes the painting from above and slightly to one side. She pauses. In her right hand is a slender, long-handled sable brush; her left is held near her side, bracelet and topaz glittering, wisp of smoke curling from the omnipresent cigarette. She applies a touch of paint and then stands back, brush still poised, holding the pose: a portrait of the artist as her own creation—an elegant figure perfectly framed in the lighted doorway set against the backdrop of a soft, black night. Article on Tamara de L,empicka is reprinted with permission of Joanne Harrison and Houston City magazine IHM, Inc. Copyright 1978. DECEMBER/JANUARY 1979 HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH 17