Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 4, No. 1, December 1978 - January 1979
Page 10
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 4, No. 1, December 1978 - January 1979 - Page 10. December 1978 - January 1979. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. February 19, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/884/show/866.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(December 1978 - January 1979). Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 4, No. 1, December 1978 - January 1979 - Page 10. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/884/show/866

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 4, No. 1, December 1978 - January 1979 - Page 10, December 1978 - January 1979, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed February 19, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/884/show/866.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 4, No. 1, December 1978 - January 1979
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date December 1978 - January 1979
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 10
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_546aj.jpg
Transcript Margaret Mead 1902-1978 Transcript of Margaret Mead's address to the IWY delegation. Women of America: This conference may well be a turning point, not only in the history of the women's movement. . . but, in the history of the world itself. We have a chance, at last, to act as women in a way that women have not been able to act, virtually since the paleolithic period. Someone talked last night about restoring women to full partnership with men. They haven't been there since the development of large-scale civilization, when they were left behind at the hearth as the men organized up and up and up until now they have got to the position where they can cook millions of tons of food without ever remembering that anybody eats it. Women's traditional tasks through history, during which they cooperated with men to make a full society, were to care for the young and the old and the weak and the poor and the preservation of society. When they were left behind and robbed of any political power for the last 10,000 years, civilization has been in charge of only one sex. Men know a lot about dying but they don't know enough about living. It has been women's biological and social and cultural task through history to live. It is true that women risk their lives in childbirth and men risk their lives on the borders protecting their country. Men had to be willing to die and to kill for the safety of their women and children and their land and their faiths, but women had to be willing to live day after day, year after year, caring for the everyday needs of children who would have died without them. At this moment in history, the United States is the richest and strongest .country in the world. It is the country . . . that has the greatest chance to save the world. The women's movement has at least succeeded in placing enough women in strategic positions of power. . . We have women on Congressional committees; we have women in disarmament agencies; we have women in all the points that are essential for an understanding that we must stop this arms race and we must stop the proliferation of nuclear power if we are going to protect the people of the world. So, it may be thought that we have now reached "take-off" point. We have a President who is willing to undertake leadership in stopping nuclear weapons proliferation and deescalating the arms race and stopping ourselves from being "merchants of death." It is not, I say, without historic significance that we share the news today with an attempt to solve the problems between Israel and the Arabs by human friendliness instead of by giving weapons to both sides. It is amazing what it is possible now to do. I think if we can ask, on the one hand, why women have arisen to the call for peace, and then, gone home again and risen, and then, gone home again and risen, and then, gone home again, we can say we have never had a concerted movement before because most of the appeals that have been made to us have been threats and women are very hard to scare. It has been women's task throughout history to go on believing in life, when there was almost no hope, and they are unable to deal only with despair. What we must present to every woman in this country today is that if we will act unitedly, forget every other consideration on earth, as we do when our children are at stake, we may be able to turn this world around and produce a world in which our children and other people's children will be safe.'* On Sunday, November 20, 1977, delegates to the National Women's Conference stood and sang "Happy Birthday Dear Margaret" in honor of anthropologist Margaret Mead's 75th birthday. Moments later, she urged women to work for peace. "Women are the nurturers and one of the things we care about is life." That same evening audiences gave 77 year old folksinger Malvina Reynolds a standing ovation after her concert with Margie Adam and Sweet Honey in the Rock. "Hearing Malvina sing was sufficient payment for all the hours I worked," said one IWY volunteer. Malvina Reynolds died last March 17 and Margaret Mead died on November 15. Perhaps in no other modern academic discipline did one person stand so clearly head and shoulders above her colleagues as did Dr. Mead. "Anthropology without Margaret Mead—unthinkable," was the reaction of one young anthropologist. A celebration of life In words and 10 HQySTORpREAKTBRQlJjQPI ,>DE£fip.ER/JANU4RX l?t7(9