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Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 4, No. 1, December 1978 - January 1979
Page 9
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Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 4, No. 1, December 1978 - January 1979 - Page 9. December 1978 - January 1979. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 4, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/884/show/865.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(December 1978 - January 1979). Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 4, No. 1, December 1978 - January 1979 - Page 9. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/884/show/865

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 4, No. 1, December 1978 - January 1979 - Page 9, December 1978 - January 1979, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 4, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/884/show/865.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 4, No. 1, December 1978 - January 1979
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date December 1978 - January 1979
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 9
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_546ai.jpg
Transcript lived for more than a year." As a result of this woman's experience, Dr. Kubler- Ross studied hundreds of cases of individuals who had actually been declared dead and survived. In each case, she found that the dying person was very much aware of leaving the body. "The only thing you lose when you die is something you don't need anymore—your physical body " concludes Dr. Kubler-Ross. "Dying is simply a transition into a higher state of consciousness where you continue to perceive, to understand, to laugh, to be able to grow. Not one of my patients who's had this experience was ever again afraid to die." That is not to say, however, that death is not a frightening experience for those who have never had the experience of dying. Dr. Kubler-Ross places the blame for this situation on our society's withdrawal from death. She feels that the entire experience should be communicated openly. "Hospitals should open their doors to visiting children; children should visit their relatives in nursing homes. Even if they're never told, children know when a parent or brother or sister is dying. They need to talk to them. Visits from children also bring relief to the dying. It gives them inner peace instead of chemical peace." Indeed, Dr. Kubler-Ross is concerned about children and death. And her observations about children can well be applied to those of all ages who are dealing with death. "I take all my patients home to die," she declares. "Most of my patients are children. I put their bed by the biggest window in the house. Often it's in a front room, and there the child has lots of communication. All children are afraid to be alone and the dying child especially so." Dr. Kubler-Ross spoke of one little girl, close to dying, who had a very loving and cooperative family. There was some reason, however, that she was not ready to die. According to Dr. Kubler- Ross, "She was a very bright student. She loved school, and she finally admitted that not being able to return to school that year was painful. She felt God was mad at her, that she had somehow failed to please God. I asked her if her teacher ever gave students especially hard assignments. She replied that the teacher only gave hard assignments to the very best students, and she was one of those students. I asked her then if she thought her illness was a hard assignment, and she was able to reply with a smile that she thought it was one of the hardest anybody ever had. Very soon after that conversation the little girl died peacefully. Communication was the key that unlocked her feelings of guilt." Communication was apparently rare in Dr. Kubler-Ross' childhood. As she tells it, "My parents wanted a beautiful 10-pound baby. They certainly didn't expect triplets, but triplets they got. At two pounds, I had to be a disappointment to them. Since the other two were so much larger, they commanded a great deal more of our parents' respect and attention. I found myself the 'odd child out'." To compensate for her lack of parental comfort, Kubler-Ross turned to her pet rabbits. They became the objects of her love and concern. It was through these pets that she learned her first lessons about death. Her pets were butchered for food for the family, and Kubler-Ross experienced the loss firsthand. There were other episodes in her life that made death a reality to her. She relates her experiences this way, "When World War II was over, I wanted to do something for this world. I promised myself that I would walk all the way to Poland and Russia and start first aid stations. I kept that promise. That is where I think this work on death and dying began. I personally saw the concentration camps. I saw the trainloads of baby shoes and trainloads of human hair from concentration camp victims going to Germany to make pillows." It was such experiences that led Dr. Kubler-Ross to form her own opinions about human suffering. "We only call it 'stages of dying' for lack of a better term. If you lose a job or a loved one or have to move away from where you've always lived, or lose a pet or even a contact lens—all these are stages of dying. This is the meaning of suffering." And suffering is the very thing that Dr. Elisabeth Kubler-Ross has helped to alleviate in the world today. Berkeley women's music collective Tryin' To Survive We are pleased to announce the release of our second album available through Olivia Records, 2662 Harrison, Oakland, CA 94612. For one album send $6.00 plus $1.00 for mailing. For more than one album, mailing fee is 10% of total record cost. LIFE INSURANCE OPPORTUNITY Major property-casualty insurance company staffing Woodlands office in early 1979, requires experienced life sales supervisor to call on independent agents in a number of Houston suburbs. Salary bonus, company car, expence account. Mail confidential resume to: ROBERT O. FELKER, CLU INA P.O. Box 2786 Houston, Texas 77001 An Equal Opportunity Employer M/F The car that deserves a second glance. At first glance, you might think an Avis Sale Car is a new car. But it's a young used car, a year old or so. Maintained under Avis' Car Care Program and Quality Assurance Inspection as a Rent-A-Car. And we've even added a limited powertrain warranty. So remember: Avis sells used cars — kept young by Avis Car Care Maintenance. WE TRY HARDER 1-45 at Shepherd 931-0900 2336 W. Holcomb Blvd. 666-0158 Robert Lake Independent Roofer Over 30 \/ears experience New Roofs Installed Leaky Roofs Repaired Call 527-9614 or leave message at 644-4759 Will hire and train roofers Art & Donna V. Adair announce the formation of THE WRITING COMPANY serving the writing and editing needs of business and industry P.O. Box 3454 • Houston, Texas 77001 • 713-521-9436 (^~~iuitar vZ/-\allery \^S of Houstonjnc For the Finest in Classic Guitars, Guitar Instruction, and Music and Accessories for the Classic Guitarist. 1401 Richmond Avenue 528-5666 DECEMBER/JANUARY 1979 HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH