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Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 4, No. 1, December 1978 - January 1979
Page 7
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Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 4, No. 1, December 1978 - January 1979 - Page 7. December 1978 - January 1979. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. February 21, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/884/show/863.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(December 1978 - January 1979). Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 4, No. 1, December 1978 - January 1979 - Page 7. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/884/show/863

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 4, No. 1, December 1978 - January 1979 - Page 7, December 1978 - January 1979, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed February 21, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/884/show/863.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 4, No. 1, December 1978 - January 1979
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date December 1978 - January 1979
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 7
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_546ag.jpg
Transcript paper in Texas, the San Antonio Light, where the editorial staff is unionized. As we go to press, we learned of another meeting with the editorial staff, where they were informed that salaries would be brought in line with the Chronicle. Staffers asking for more details were told that would all be worked out later. Which did not sit too well with the skeptics in the group, who were hoping for more concrete evidence of parity with their peers. Can Barbara Walters find happiness as a million-dollar-a-year voyeur? Apparently so, if her latest ABC special is any indication. She interviewed Alan Alda, Diana Ross, Steve Martin and Jordan's Queen Noor. Alda kept his usual dignity in the face of such questions as "You work with so many beautiful women, could you have another relationship?" Alda, happily married for many years, replied, "Just because I work with attractive women doesn't mean I think they're available." Then on to 'girl-talk' with Diana Ross, followed by a light-weight, trick-photography sequence with Steve Martin that I'm sure was supposed to be hilarious, but which fizzled miserably. The final session showed Walters at her worst, where she gushes and fawns over world rulers (remember 'my friend the Shah'?) The fawnee in this case was Queen Noor of Jordan. Walters asked breathlessly "I know I shouldn't ask this question but I'm going to anyway. (Pregnant pause.) You love him (King Hussein) very much, don't you?" Walters used to be a serious, gutsy interviewer. With this special she seems to have crossed over completely from news to entertainment. Mike Wallace, of CBS' 60 Minutes, believes in the confrontation style of interviewing. His accusatory manner often unnerves the subject of the interview and results in the sought-after damaging statements. Good taste is not his forte. But Wallace got his comeuppance last month when he interviewed film director Roman Polanski in France. (Polanski fled this country rather than stand trial on charges he drugged, then had sex with, a 13-year-old girl.) Speaking about Polanski's life with Sharon Tate, murdered by the Manson gang, Wallace asked, "Isn't it true that you were into drugs, wild parties and kinky sex?" Polanski's reply was "People watching this on TV have stopped eating now—you have their attention. My reply will make no difference. They will remember only the question. It's as if you were to ask somebody 'Is it true that you had sex with a zebra in the middle of Trafalgar Square?' He would say 'Of course not! Are you crazy?' but people would remember the question, not the answer." As one viewer wrote in to CBS, "I ended up liking Polanski more and CBS less." Hard times in the magazine world, where the casualty list grows longer every day. New Times has bit the dust, and Horizon has been bought by Antiques Monthly. Viva is no more and High Times is at an all-time low after the suicide of publisher Tom Rofcade. Outside, the Rolling Stone venture, has been sold after losing $2 million in less than two years. TV Guide is hurting from all the free TV books in newspapers, and the December issue of Your Place, McCall's magazine for young adults, was the last. Hustler is in trouble since Larry Flynt found Christianity, and Politicks has folded. Feminist periodicals are faring no better than the rest. The Monthly Extract, a health-oriented paper, has run out, and New York City's feminist bi-weekly Majority Report has ceased publication after seven years. The city government of Stafford, a small town just outside Houston, may be more sophisticated about cable TV than our own. While members of Houston's city council, notably Louis Macey, want ordinances to ban X and R rated movies from cable TV, the mayor of Stafford, Leonard Scarcella, says "I like Walt Disney but I don't want a stead- y diet of it." Speaking to the Stafford city council, he stressed the importance of parental control of TV viewing. Unfortunately, Stafford will not be able to go it alone. As Scarcella admitted, "It sure looks like Houston will control standards for the entire area." President Carter was recently invited by the Mormon Church to accept a "family life" award in Salt Lake City. A spokesperson for the church said it was not an annual award, but purely a media event. He said he thought it "cute" for a born-again Christian to be honored by the Mormons. The Mormons for ERA asked Carter to c/ryrKBASVf&e. THB MAM. NOSTALGIC CLOTHING y&te 452 W. 19th St. (inThe Heights) 868-3052 Open 11-6 Mon-Sat. *& Barthelme-Moore Associates Advertising and Marketing a full-service advertising agency since 1960 Helen Moore Barthelme Odell Pauline Moore 1110 Lovett Blvd., Suite 100 Houston, Texas 77006 713/521-9214 A pre-holiday sale on books and feminist T-shirts Do LA & daughter a feminist store 1623 Westheimer Houston,TX 77006 (713)529-3609 Monday - Friday 5 PM - 9 PM Saturday 10 AM-6 PM hous ov-kol'man n. 1. A woman-owned business specializing in quality graphics and printing. 2. A large red brick house in the heart of Montrose. - adj. Having many and varied features, - v. Producing design, illustration, camera work, printing and bindery. - adv. 1. To increase the client's business manifold. 2. To satisfy the client. House of Coleman 901 West Alabama - Houston 77006 -(713) 523-2521 DECEMBER/JANUARY 1979 HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH