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Broadside, Vol. 4, No. 12, December 1973
Page 9
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Broadside, Vol. 4, No. 12, December 1973 - Page 9. December 1973. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 24, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/818/show/813.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(December 1973). Broadside, Vol. 4, No. 12, December 1973 - Page 9. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/818/show/813

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Broadside, Vol. 4, No. 12, December 1973 - Page 9, December 1973, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 24, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/818/show/813.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Broadside, Vol. 4, No. 12, December 1973
Publisher National Organization for Women, Houston Chapter
Date December 1973
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Political activity--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Women--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • National Organization for Women
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location HQ1439 .H68 B75
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b3767173~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
Item Description
Title Page 9
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File Name femin_201109_070i.jpg
Transcript December 1973 BROADSIDE Page 9 BOOK REVIEWS by Mary Ross Rhyne Although neither of the books I'm reviewing here is specifically "feminist", both are of special interest to feminists, because they describe how particularly interesting, gifted women dealt with some of the social pressures which we all feel, as women. To me, they're bonus books — interesting on their terms, and also from a feminist standpoint. Buried Alive is how Myra Friedman, a theatrical agent, saw her client Janis Joplin — buried in the blues all her life. This book has been widely praised, probably because it is rare to have a serious, thoughtful biography of a pop star. The author was a close and devoted friend of Janis' who visited Port Arthur and interviewed many people from Janis' early life to provide material for her book. Natives of the Beaumont/Port Arthur area will especially enjoy the full treatment Friedman gives Port Arthur. This book is strong and interesting because it has a thesis: that Janis was compelled to be an extremist, but basically sought acceptance; and that her audiences and friends exerted almost immoral pressure on her to perform her self-destructive theatrics. You may disagree with Friedman's analysis — some friends of mine who knew Janis do -- but it is reasonable and well argued. As a feminist, I was especially interested in how Janis perceived and reacted to others' attitudes about her lack of physical beauty and her sexual reputation. It's also fascinating to muse on the roles that our culture offers for female entertainers. Maybe the best compliment I can pay this book (and it is well deserved) is that it holds one's interest and moreover builds great tension even though one knows exactly how it ends. Portrait of a Marriage reveals a very different world from Port Arthur. Vita Sackville- West and Harold Nicolson (contemporaries of Virginia Woolf) weren't aristocrats by British standards, but they were close — and were bright and imaginative as well. Their conservative political views and social snobbishness may repel you, but this book documents their most personal emotional lives, which were enthralling. The central episode is the torrid love affair between Vita and her girlhood friend Violet Trefusis, which began only after Vita and Harold were married and had two sons. The relationship lasted seven years, during which Violet made a very unfortunate marriage. The tensions and drama of the four- way rivals are described here with great delicacy and feeling, mostly in Vita's own account of it all, which she wrote at 28 and which her son found after her death only a few years ago. After the women's affair began, Vita and Harold never made love again. Both found physical affection with members of their own sex. But they remained wedded by a remarkably strong bond of devotion and loyalty which lasted nearly fifty years, till Vita's death. Harold Nicolson, the son, writes about his parents' relationship with candor, respect, and affection. It was a very open marriage — the O'Neills would freak out. In addition to the feelings and insights explored by the book, one is struck by the fact that Vita was terribly penalized for not being male. Her family home, Knole, which may have been the focus of her strongest feeling of devotion throughout her life, could not be hers because British laws forbade daughters to inherit. Vita was sharply aware of this discrimination all her life. In reading of the pleasure it gave her to dress as a soldier and go out at night with Violet, one remembers how Vita longed to own Knole, and suspects that part of the happiness of playing "Julian" lay in the perhaps unexpressed feeling that in that role she could have all the things she was denied as Vita — including Knole. This is a beautifully written book and, moreover, beautifully produced, with photographs, handsome paper, and civilized margins. It would make a beautiful Christmas gift to someone you care about.