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University News, Vol. 2, No. 2, February 1982
Page 3
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University News, Vol. 2, No. 2, February 1982 - Page 3. February 1982. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 15, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/804/show/798.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(February 1982). University News, Vol. 2, No. 2, February 1982 - Page 3. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/804/show/798

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

University News, Vol. 2, No. 2, February 1982 - Page 3, February 1982, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 15, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/804/show/798.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title University News, Vol. 2, No. 2, February 1982
Publisher National Organization for Women, University of Houston Chapter.
Date February 1982
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Women--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • National Organization for Women
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location HQ1101 .N684
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1476015~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 3
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  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_222c.jpg
Transcript Scholars Face A Challenge By Feminists By EDWARD B.FISKE Using scholarship developed in the feminist movement, women in colleges and universities are questioning the fundamental tenets of academic fields ranging from history and philosophy to the natural sciences. These scholars argue that most academic disciplines reflect the cultural biases and thinking patterns of men and are based, for example, on data involving male political figures and male psychological subjects. As a result, they are challenging not only some commonly held scholarly conclusions but the underlying methods of research., Although the, feminists "new scholarship*' has not been discussed widely enough yet to provoke much response from other scholars, some women say it is almost certain to pmvoke sharp controversy. Among their revisionist ideas are these: , <The Renaissance, a time In which women lost many of the privileges they had in the era of chivalry, should not be viewed as a "progressive" era in West* em civilization, <Artistic creations such as quilts and diaries are just as valuable for the. understanding of culture as those deemed "finearts." <The current excitement over recombinant DNA represents an overly "mechanistic" approach to the question of the nature of life. The women's challenge grew out of to criticize it. We would certainly expect controversy, since to suggest that disci- the women's studies movement begun in the late 1960's. Women on campuses se out to document the contributions of women to fields tanging from literature to science, and they organized courses, programs and even full departments, usually on an interdisciplinary basis, to incorporate these findings into instruction. According to Florence Howe, a professor of American studies at the State University College at Old Westbuxy, L.I.,: who founded the Feminist Press, about 350 colleges now have organized women's studies programs, and 600 other institutions offer at least 25 courses in the field. She estimates that there are 20,000 such courses nation- wide. Several years ago strategists in the movement changed their emphasis; from setting up-separate courses to "mainstreaming," or pushing to incorporate material on the experience of women into regular programs. The goal was to prevent research about women from being isolated and to assure that it was being taken seriously. Now women argue that the feminist critique of existing scholarship has matured sufficiently to enter a third and "corrective" stage in which the fruits of their work not only supplement the traditional corpus of knowledge but challenge many of its presuppositions. "You don't simply add the idea that the world is round to the idea that the world is flat," Elizabeth Minnich, a philosophy scholar at the Union Graduate School in Washington, told a major conference on the subject recently at Wingspread, a conference center in Racine, Wis. "you go back and rethink the whole enterprise." Controversy Expected Margaret V McIntosh of the Center for Research on Women at Wellesley College said: "The latest stage is so new that people haven't really had a chance to criticize it. We would certainly expect controversy, since to suggest that disciples need to be corrected--either in their ideas or methodology-- is to challenge professors' snse that they understand the assumptions underlying their disciplines." Some scholars, however, have offered sympathetic, if ambivalent, responses. Carl Degler, the Stanford University historian said that it was "absolutely essential" to interpret the past in terms of "human beings, not just men" and that this would inevitably lead to some "different views." "We normally think of wars as interruptive," he said. "But for women as a group, wars often open up opportunities. No one has spelled it out clearly, but what happened in World War II with women in the factories clearly had its effect on the entry of married women into the work force after the war." The impact of feminist scholars' work varies from field to field. In some, according to Dr. McIntosh, the principal effect is to "enlarge the sample" of what scholars study. Thus, women argue that any definition of the gross national product, the total goods and services produced by the country in a certain period, that does not take into account the unpaid labor of women in the home and community represents only a partial description of economic productivity. Likewise, women have requently critied Sigmund Freud and other psychologists for developing models of what is "normal" on the basis of samples that are all or predominantly male. Lawrence Kohlberg, a developmental psychologist at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, for example, used an all-male sample to develop a theory that people develop their capabilities for "moral reasoning" through six identifiable stages. However, Carol F. Gilligan, also at Harvard, tested the Kohlberg theory on a sample of women and reported that NOW AT UH WOMEN'S STUDIES PETITION We, the undersigned, feel that the University of Houston has a responsibility to provide increased emphasis and access to Women's Studies courses that could address the changing status of women and men in this country and the issues raised by feminism.