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Daily Breakthrough, November 20, 1977
Page 28
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Daily Breakthrough, November 20, 1977 - Page 28. November 20 1977. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 23, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/663/show/657.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(November 20 1977). Daily Breakthrough, November 20, 1977 - Page 28. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/663/show/657

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Daily Breakthrough, November 20, 1977 - Page 28, November 20 1977, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 23, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/663/show/657.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Daily Breakthrough, November 20, 1977
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date November 20 1977
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332726~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 28
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  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_535ba.jpg
Transcript Ann, Carol and Betty are real women. Only their names have been changed. These women, and thousands like them, found that although society (and their husbands) encouraged them to stay at home and care for their families, they are now being penalized for not having "worked." They are learning, too, that their volunteer efforts, once extolled as essential to maintaining the community, provide no Social Security or pension benefits. These women never worried about such things. They expected to reap the benefits of years of hard work in the future. Typically, they are in their middle year, full-time homemakers dependent on another family member's paycheck. Unlike other workers, they have no built- in protection against total financial disaster. They are ineligible for unemployment benefits or other pensions because their work was in the home and unpaid; they do not receive Social Security benefits because they are too young. They are ineligible for welfare programs if they are able- bodied and their youngest child is over 18. Because they lack saleable skills and have no "recent paid work experience" they have great difficulty re-entering the job market. They may find themselves discriminated against because of sex, age and even appearance. Their homemakers' roles have led them to identify career goals in relation to their husbands and their experiences and educations seldom have related to their own talents and skills. They are members of America's "new poor." An important first step in helping displaced homemakers is to recognize that their problems have national implications. Through the efforts of the Alliance for Displaced Homemakers (ADH), of Oakland, Calif., a national network of centers for displaced homemakers are being developed. Laurie Shields, ADH National Coordinator and Tish Sommers, National coordinator-NOW Task Force On Older Women, have shown that displaced home- makers exist in every state of the union and are of every race, creed and color. Forty-seven states have rushed pell- mell into enacting no-fault divorce laws. Only nine of those recognize the contribution of the homemaker as a factor to consider in economic arrangements at divorce. The growth of no-fault divorce* without concurrent changes in provisions for division of property, alimony and child support, has eroded the economic protection of dependent spouses and children, which has always been minimal. The changing status of the family, the national tendency towards mobility and rootlessness, the physical separation of nuclear families from the traditional extended families, the poor employment opportunities for women of all ages, ageism, sexism and a depressed job market have all combined to leave older women unprotected and ill-prepared to deal with their middle years alone. Passage of state and federal displaced homemakers legislation is also important. ADH points out that such legislation should call for the creation of multipurpose service centers offering peer counseling, evaluation of native or acquired skills, job training and job placement, health education, legal counseling services, financial management services and outreach and information services relating to existing local and federal programs. In addition, displaced homemakers legislation should mandate the creation of new jobs—innovative avenues to decent salaried employment coupling the special skills of the former homemaker with unmet social needs of the community. The widow of today faces the same individual problems of yesterday's widow. But because women tend to outlive men, there are far more widows than ever before. Department of Labor statistics indicate that there are over 12 million widows in this country. Their median age is 56. THE DINNER PARTY HP"""" "^ saL 'M* ' •Bfc^ I #r M^-^ -" Jan Carson Diana Fallis Elma Barrera KTRK-TV SALUTES THE WOMEN OF ^EYEWITNESS NEWS Phyllis Deter By Charlotte Moser Queen Elizabeth I, Emily Dickinson and an Egyptian pharaoh are coming to dinner and California artist Judy Chicago is throwing a $35,000 party for them. A leading figure in the women's art movement and author of Through the Flower, Chicago has designed a room-size equilateral triangular table, 140 feet on a side, with places set for 39 honored women guests from history. Some 50 women aje working in Chicago's Santa Monica studio firing porcelain dinnerware, embroidering napkins and painting plates for the three-year project, The Dinner Party, which received a matching $17,500 grant from National Endowment for the Arts last summer. It is scheduled to open at San Fran cisco's Museum of Modern Art in late and then circulate around the country. Called "a reinterpretation of the Last Supper," it will be permanently housed in either Washington, D.C. or California. The subject matter of The Dinner Party is women's culture and history. Beneath the table, a floor of hand-made tiles will be inscribed with names of 999 women who have made an impact on history. Each place setting will include a 14-inch porcelain plate, porcelain chalice and flatware. A cloth runner and napkins embroidered in keeping with the era of each guest will complete the table. All the designs have been made by Chicago but the craft work-traditionally seen as women's work—is being done by her associates. It's an effort to incorporate the idea of women as artists through history-through the power of their personalities, their social awareness as hostesses and nurturers, and as craftspeople. Mary Ellen Conway th*Mtiti^'mwi The Susan B. Anthony Gavel Given to the driving force who helped create the first International Council of Women in 1888, it honors those early advocates of women's rights who took the movement out of the kitchen and onto the streets. Now you can honor that spirit with this handsome reproduction of Ms. Anthony's original, now in the Smithsonian Institution. Carefully crafted by Stieff in rosewood, sterling and an ecologically acceptable substitute for the original ivory, the inscribed faces mark the occasion and admonish the user to note that "Order is Heaven's first Law." And the wide sterling band, marked with both the Smithsonian and Stieff hallmarks, is perfect for engraving. Price: $37.50 gift box included. & The Susan B. Anthony Gavel Part of the Smithsonian Series by StiefT. Available at Foley's Department Store Regal Touch All Stores 458 Greenspoints Mall Corrigan Jewelers All Stores The Stieff Company, 800 Wyman Park Drive, Baltimore, Maryland 21211 Dana Millikin DAILY BREAKTHROUGH NOVEMBER 20, 1977 PAGE 27