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Daily Breakthrough, November 20, 1977
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Daily Breakthrough, November 20, 1977 - Page 25. November 20 1977. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 29, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/663/show/654.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(November 20 1977). Daily Breakthrough, November 20, 1977 - Page 25. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/663/show/654

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Daily Breakthrough, November 20, 1977 - Page 25, November 20 1977, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 29, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/663/show/654.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Daily Breakthrough, November 20, 1977
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date November 20 1977
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332726~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 25
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_535ax.jpg
Transcript ~~7kin is a 52-year-old widow from Milwaul^e. This afternoon she returned home from the Social Security office trying to grasp the facts she had been given, to digest the information in the pamphlets in her hand. During her husband's long illness their savings had dwindled, she had known that "someday" she would need financial help and she believed she had it. Hadn't he told her she would be provided for? And yet only today she found out that she would not be eligible for Social Security benefits for 10 years* His company had no retirement plan. She had not worked outside the home for 23 years. There would be no money coming in. She added and re-added the columns of figures,' carefully averaging car care, gasoline, medication, the house note, her $1,000 life insurance premium-even the $60 she budgeted yearly for Christmas and birthday gifts and the $10 a month for clothes and cleaning. It came to $490 a month with no "emergencies." Her income was—$0. She had a four-month reserve in the bank. And after that, Ann would bo destitute. She fingered the slim wedding band she had worn since February 1945 and recalled their youth and their sureness. She was a college junior; he a Marine lieutenant facing the invasion of Japan. They had six weeks together before he shipped out from San Diego. She had returned to the university, only somewhat disturbed because her period was late. By April she knew she was pregnant, and accepted the Dean's decision that, in an all-woman college in 1945, no one who was pregnant could remain as a student. It set a bad example. Shortly after D-Day, June 6, 1945, she prematurely delivered a one and a half pound baby girl who lived three days. When he came home late that summer, he consoled her. "We'll have more," he said. Neither was aware the birth had left her sterile. She had worked to support them through his graduate degree. There were, of course, no more children. His career with an engineering firm kept them on the move from one construction site to another for the next 20 years. Her life was indexed by dams and bridges, by states and sometimes by continents. They had paid the heavy medical expenses of both their parents, telling each other, "Well, after all, we don't have children and the other kids do." They had invested in a profit sharing plan which was valued at less than half of what they had put into it. "It'll go back up," he said. "Just you watch." So far it had not. They had been saving people. They had made a good salary. They were the aunt and uncle always available for a semester loan, a family emergency, an urgent church need. At 50 he had accepted an office job at the company headquarters and, at last, they had bought a home. At 54, after two years of- a prolonged and agonizing fight with cancer, he was dead. The Cinderella without the By Chase Hardy and Charlotte Stewart night nurses, the trips to Mayo, the specialists and their equipment had eaten up their savings. Ann knew she must work, she had never been afraid of it. Hadn't she help set up clinics and schools wherever they had gone, from Africa to Arizona? "It's know- how," he had always said. "Well," she thought, "I know how." Her visit to the employment office the next day left her apprehensive. She had looked well-groomed and had spoken articulately of her volunteer work and her successful career as a wife and homemaker. The counselor had listened patiently, and asked her about her work experience. CHARLOTTE TAFT "Well, I was working," she said. "For 30 years. That's what I've been saying." "I mean paid work," explained the counselor. "My husband and I agreed that I was to keep the home," Ann said. "That is a full time job if you do it right. And we moved constantly with the company. But wherever we were I was always active in the community. I've done a little bit of everything." The counselor toyed with his pencil. "Ann," he said, "do you have a friend or relative who will hire you? Give you some on-the-job training?" "You mean you have nothing at all I can do?" "Not now," he said. "But keep on checking with us. Something may turn up. The job market is really tight now. I would make a suggestion, however. I'm sure you would qualify for food stamps and you really should apply for them." She left the office, returned to her car and sat quietly for a few minutes. She began to assimilate the impact of what he had said. Her only alternative was welfare. Ann is learning to be a displaced homemaker. (lirol, 46, had spent her birthday en- route To Dallas from Baltimore and was relieved at finally being settled in a new home. This had been their 18th move with Tom's company. She was excited about a forthcoming trip that she and Tom were taking to the Caribbean. True, it would be a business trip, but the company was paying for it and for their babysitter as well. They had been married just under 20 years and Tom had worked long and hard in the scramble to get the coveted vice- • president of sales job that he'd recently accepted. Five months before, he had come to Dallas to start the new job and had left Carol and their five children in Baltimore to "tie up the loose ends." The "loose ends" included selling the house, packing their belongings, rounding up school and medical records, arranging for the movers, and the thousands of other chores involved in a long distance transfer. Carol had accomplished it all, she told herself with pride, and their family had, once again, established "instant roots" in their new home in Texas. It had been a lonely, exhausting and tiring five months but, thank God, thought Carol, it was all over now. Tom had traveled often in the last 15 years. And always when he had moved up to a new job he had left the details of hearth and home and kids to Carol so that he could concentrate on his new responsibilities. Really, Carol didn't mind . . . too much. She felt that her job was to make Tom's easier. After all, Tom's success was her success too, wasn't it? Continued on page 26 cering Tishs Dishes (713) 980466? PAGE 24 NOVEMBER 20, 1977 DAILY BREAKTHROUGH IN APPRECIATION OF JUST A FEW OF THE WOMEN WHO HAVE HAD A DEEP PERSONAL IMPACT ON OUR DEVELOPMENT. IF YOU COULD KNOW THEM AS WEHAVE, YOUR LIVES WOULD BE GREATLY ENRICHED. Gertrude Barnstone Anne Lower Billie Carr Dorothy Day Ann Wharton ToniScala Dorothy Hood B. J. Walker Dr. Carol Weiner rfwlAWt^ QuJ^2^ Il^M^y RON WATERS State Representative JUDY ELDERS Admin. Aide DEBRA DANBURG Admin. Aide