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Daily Breakthrough, November 20, 1977
Page 21
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Daily Breakthrough, November 20, 1977 - Page 21. November 20 1977. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 23, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/663/show/650.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(November 20 1977). Daily Breakthrough, November 20, 1977 - Page 21. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/663/show/650

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Daily Breakthrough, November 20, 1977 - Page 21, November 20 1977, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 23, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/663/show/650.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Daily Breakthrough, November 20, 1977
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date November 20 1977
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332726~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 21
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File Name femin_201109_535at.jpg
Transcript First Women By Janet Sanders and Sue Kaufman Asking women to be "foot soldiers and not Kamikaze pilots," U.S. Rep. Barbara Jordan joined other speakers at the IWY Conference Saturday in urging delegates to avoid dissension within their ranks. "We can't expect it all to4>e our way at a time when the country is drifting, if not shifting to the right," Jordan said. "The delegates are not of a single mind. And no one person has the right answer." Jordan's keynote address on the first day of the conference topped off a series of speeches in the coliseum which adopted the same conciliatory tone. They were the prelude to what could be heated debate over certain key proposals conference organizers hope to pass. Anticipating the disagreement, former First Lady Betty Ford and First Lady Rosalynn Carter both warned women to guard against "defensiveness and anger" and not to be "dismayed by the clash of opinion." "The glue that holds us together is the knowledge that our basic goals are the same," said Carter, in a soft Georgia accent. Ford followed her by asking women to "keep it together." Acknowledging that she too was initially doubtful of the women's movement, Lady Bird Johnson, former First Lady,told delegates that "I once thought it belonged more to my daughter than it did to me. I have come to know, however, that it belongs to women of all ages." Even outspoken Bella Abzug, a New York attorney and presiding officer at the conference, reminded delegates that "our purpose is not to tell women how to live or what to do." And while she and former White House Press Secretary Liz Carpenter primarily focused their attention on women's rights goals, and not the possible division over those goals, they too attempted to smooth out the differences of opinion which might exist. "We have no intention of abandoning our role as nurturer and wife," Carpenter said. "But are we so dangerous? So forward and brash and pushy to ask for fairness?" Abzug, the U.S. representative who introduced the bill which started the ball rolling back in 1975 for a National Women's Year, said that it would be a "dull weekend" if there were not some disagreement'at the conference. "Let us agree to disagree if we must. But I hope all of us here will remember our common interest as women who have for too long been treated as merely auxiliary human beings," Abzug said. Carpenter and Jordan compared the women's rights movement to the human rights stance of President Jimmy Carter's foreign policy. Although the issues to be discussed at the' conference have generated controversy, they said, they are in themselves not controversial. "As a matter of fact, the goals sound like stanzas to America the Beautiful," Jordan told thousands of cheering delegates. "There is nothing stated in them which is incompatible with the goals of America." Nevertheless, the minority of delegates wearing the yellow "Majority" ribbons which tagged them as the anti-Equal Rights Amendment faction, remained stony-faced throughout the opening ceremony and did not join the applause. As if reading those faces, Jordan pointed out that the conference could possibly fail unless delegates used patience and remembered that "everyone must be free to define the meaning of the total woman for herself." While attempting to reconcile opposing facitions at the conference, speakers also made note of the progress which has already been made among women in the professional arena. Carter pointed to the 40-odd women holding key government positions in her husband's administration, while Carpenter made note of those women in the audience holding down a job while raising a family at the same time. Mayor Fred Hofheinz, who welcomed delegates to Houston, pointed out that police department regulations here which effectively excluded women from the police force have been recently knocked down. And Abzug, with her ever familiar hat and her glasses slipping down over her nose, noted that the conference is the first time the federal government has sponsored such an event. Yet she and other speakers also emphasized how far they say women have to go before gaining full equality with men. "We've seen our dreams sometimes shattered, often short-changed, doors closed or half closed by insecure men and women fearful of a world of equality," said Carpenter. "We mothered this nation. Are we to be shackled forever by the unending audacity of men?" Speeches were frequently interrupted by delegates chanting "ERA now!" or "Two, four, six, eight, ratified in every state." New York women waved red apples as a reminder of the "Big Apple" in their home state. The Pennsylvania delegation decorated the placard of their state with yellow balloons emblazoned with the words "women's rights." The meeting was brought to order by the same gavel suffragist Susan B. Anthony used over a century ago. A procession of Girl Scouts of all ages brought in the flags of the United Nations and the United States as delegates sang the Battle Hymn of the Republic. Halfway through the speeches five women, two of them Olympic champions, carried in a torch brought from Seneca Falls, N.Y., site of the first women's rights conference in 1848. (The text of Barbara Jordan 's speech is on page 2.) Weathermen arrested By Sue Kaufman Three alleged members of the Weather Underground were arrested by FBI agents of the Houston office Saturday afternoon as they were about to enter their car in the parking lot outside the Astrodome where a Pro-Life Rally was taking place. FBI officials in Houston said Sunday morning the three, Judith Emily Bissell, 33; Clayton Van Lydegraf, 62, and a woman identified as "Esther," who the bureau said used the name Grace Fortmer, 28 to 32 years of age, were unarmed at the time cf their arrest. The Houston FBI said that the arrests culminated a seven-month undercover investigation conducted by the Los Angeles and Houston offices of the bureau. After the three were arrested, the FBI searched their apartment at 5135 North Freeway. Five handguns and an undetermined amount of explosives were seized. The three were charged with conspiracy to violate the Federal Firearms Act and possession of unregistered explosives. Bis- sel was held in lieu of $500,000 bond while Van Lydegraf and "Esther" were being held in lieu of $300,000 bond each. Van Lydegraf, who was identified as the head of the Prairie Fire Organizing Committee of the Weather Underground, allegedly directed Judith Emily Bissell, "Esther," Paul Daly and Michael Justesen (Daly and Justesen were arrested by the FBI in Los Angeles today) "to recruit individuals to join an underground political group which had as its primary objectives assassinations of public figures and bombings of public buildings in an effort to further their political goals; i.e. performing revolutionary acts against government organizations," the FBI said. 0£*#»JfiOJVM» 8** l&m*$$f€0jn Housing Discri initiation Is Illegal PAGE 20 NOVEMBER 20, 1977 DAILY BREAKTHROUGH Call: 222-5411 City of Houston Fair Housing Division|