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Daily Breakthrough, November 20, 1977
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Daily Breakthrough, November 20, 1977 - Page 15. November 20 1977. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 29, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/663/show/645.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(November 20 1977). Daily Breakthrough, November 20, 1977 - Page 15. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/663/show/645

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Daily Breakthrough, November 20, 1977 - Page 15, November 20 1977, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 29, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/663/show/645.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Daily Breakthrough, November 20, 1977
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date November 20 1977
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332726~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 15
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_535ao.jpg
Transcript *he Puerto Rican delegation attending the National Women's Conference hope to make their voices heard in Spanish. They have asked the National Commission on the Observance of International Women's Year to provide simultaneous, translation in Spanish-English at all confer-' ence events. "We have not been given a definite answer, but hope we'll have a bilingual con- of the family. We have many more elderly women than men and their needs have to be attended to," said Pico-Hernandez, who is past president of the Puerto Rico Commission for the Betterment of Women's Rights. The Commission was created by a law passed by the Puerto Rican Legislature in 1973, and has been one of the strongest driving forces behind the women's move- One of the bills passed, giving married women equal power in administering common property, had been introduced in the legislature for eight consecutive years. One of the discriminatory laws done away with prohibited women from having their own businesses and placed them in the same category with those who need special protection from the state: the insane, minors and the deaf and dumb. director of the legal aid clinic of the University of Puerto Rico's Law School. "One of the resolutions we are very interested in is the one supporting passage of the Equal Rights Amendment. Although the Constitution of Puerto Rico has a clause that prohibits discrimination because of sex, it is imperative that the United State's one does too, since we have such close ties with the mainland." i ARRIBA, ARRIBA! ference. We feel it is only by giving us, the Hispanic-American women, a choice of speaking in our native tongue that our voices will be heard clearly," said Isabel Pico-Hernandez, a Puerto Rican delegate, during a telephone conversation from San Juan, the island's capital. "It is not that many of us can't speak English," said Pico-Hernandez, who has a doctorate in political science from Harvard University and is a college professor. "We feel more comfortable speaking Spanish and we can express ourselves better in Spanish." In addition, the Puerto Rico delegation, which has 17 members (five of them alternate delegates), will bring to Houston a series of resolutions which the island's women have asked them to present to the conference. These resolutions were drafted at an island-wide women's conference and four smaller caucuses held in the summer. A referendum has been taken among the 1,500 women who attended the meetings to determine which resolutions will take top billing. The resolutions cover a variety of subjects from child care to inclusion of Puerto Rico in the scope of some Federal laws which now do not apply to the island. One of these is a provision of the Social Security Act which has a clause that provides for people 72 years and older to receive benefits even if they did not pay into the system. "This affects many of our elderly women, since they tend to be the survivors By Meriemil Rodriguez ment on the island. Its members are appointed by the island's Senate. The commissioners serve from three to four years. During the 1975-76 legislative session the Commission, with the help of a female state* senator, introduced and got approved 17 bills doing away with laws that discriminated against women, especially married women. TOTSIE STEWART To date, Puerto Rico's married women can't file separate income tax returns and there is no such thing as a joint tax return. The husband always files for both. "For the women of Puerto Rico as well as the United States, the fact that the conference is going to take place is a significant step forward," said Ivette Ramos, a lawyer who is an alternate delegate and The ties between Puerto Rico and the United States date back almost 100 years. The Caribbean island, 100 miles long by 35 miles wide, situated 1,600 miles southeast of New York, became part of the United States in 1898 as a result of the Spanish-American War. Puerto Ricans became American citizens in 1917, but island residents don't vote in Presidential elections. On July 25, 1952, the island became a Commonwealth voluntarily associated with the United States as a result of a com: pact signed by the two countries and approved at the polls by the Puerto Ricans. The question of Federal statehood for Puerto Rico is a hotly debated issue on the island. The delegates to the women's conference will represent the many faces of Puerto Rico—racially, economically, educationally and socially. The delegation has four lawyers, one Catholic nun who is a sociologist, a labor leader, two state senators (one of whom is an artist), a school superintendent, a municipal worker, one college professor, two social workers, a home- maker who is a home economist, one physician, a television producer and a student. The majority of the women are between the ages of 26 and 56 and most are Catholics. MERIEMIL RODRIGUEZ, a Puerto Rican, is assistant professor in journalism at the University of Houston and has written for the New York Daily News, the San Juan Star and others. Art Caucus By Charlotte Moser In the last year, Philadelphia formed a new women's co-op called Muse; Kansas City staged Missouri's first women's show, and Houston brought in the exhibition of 200 artworks by women for the International Women's Year Conference. All this happened through the efforts of the Women's Caucus for Art, a five-year- old group that wants to change the art world's structure and bend society, too. The group is sponsoring today's three-hour conference on "Improving the Status of Women in Art: "Success Stories and Strategies for Gaining Recognition and Reward" beginning at 2:30 p.m. in Albert Thomas Center, Room 106. Film and video activities in Seneca Falls South are also or ganized by the group with a grant from H.E.B. Grocery. "The women's movement has brought art back into society as a whole for the first time since the 1930's," says Judith Brodsky, president of the WCA which began in 1972 under the auspices of the College Art Association. "We're involved with issues that go beyond women in art. But it took a change in generations to bring art back to the soc ial acitivism of early Artists Equity." Part of WCA's activitism is leveled at political change and part of it at internal changes in art academics. WCA's first activity was compiling figures about employment of women on art faculties, and exhibitions granted to women in galleries and museums. They came up with data showing that while 50 per cent of new Ph.D.s are women, less Continued on page 7 TheUi llage Cheese Shop DOMESTIC AND IMPORTED CHEESES <0j\ FINE WINES <^SJ GOURMET FOODS (F5^ COOKWARE MARY ELLEN ALLEN (713)527-0398 . .„., cAT Q , 2484 BOLSOVER j MUN-bAi.y-b HQUSTON, TEXAS 77005 HCUSIE Cl= CCI=I=ISI: I5IEANS 2526 Rice Blvd. in The Village/Houston, Texas 77005/(713) 524-0057 Mon.-Fri., 10:00-6:00/Sat., 10:00-5:00 PAGE 14 NOVEMBFR 20, 1977 DAILY BREAKTHROUGH