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Daily Breakthrough, November 20, 1977
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Daily Breakthrough, November 20, 1977 - Page 11. November 20 1977. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 19, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/663/show/641.

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(November 20 1977). Daily Breakthrough, November 20, 1977 - Page 11. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/663/show/641

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Daily Breakthrough, November 20, 1977 - Page 11, November 20 1977, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 19, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/663/show/641.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Daily Breakthrough, November 20, 1977
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date November 20 1977
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332726~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
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Title Page 11
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File Name femin_201109_535ak.jpg
Transcript watch out for estrogen Kay Weiss is an environmental health scientist. She publishes 15 different booklets on women's health topics. For a list of booklet titles write to Kay Weiss, 1175 Westridge Dr., Portola Valley, Calif 94025. Since the introduction of synthetic hormones 40 years ago, pharmaceutical firms have devised numerous uses for them and advertised them to physicians in medical journals. In this way, their use is directed in part by the economic motives of a profit-making industry. Hormone drug manufacture has steadily increased so that today estrogens are offered to virtually every U.S. woman from puberty throughout life for any one of dozens of uses. Between 1962-1973 dollar sales of estrogen quadrupled in the U.S. in spite of the fact that the incidence of cancer of estrogen-dependent organs was observed to be rising in association with estrogen use. In 1975, 91 million estrogen prescriptions were written for a female adult population cf 60 million. Historically, many of the decisions about how hormones should be used were based on assessments by one class (male physicians) about the normality of another. Emotional and physical "disorders" were often defined into existence and fitted to drugs that could "cure"them. Today estrogens are still used to alter female behavior, both physical and psychological. Many estrogen and progesterone hormone drugs have never been proven neces sary, most have never been proven effective and none have been proven safe. The latency period between the taking of these hormones and the development of cancer is known to be as long as 20 years, yet the Federal Drug Administration (FDA) approves hormone drugs which have been "demonstrated" safe only by short-term clinical use. Current surveys show that a majority of physicians prescribe estrogens to women without adequately informing them of the associated and proven diseases which may result and without mentioning the risk of cancer 10-20 years later. That physicians themselves are uninformed of the association between estrogen and cancer is apparent, although studies pointing to an association have appeared in medical literature as early as the 1950s. Package labeling continues to omit a statement that estrogen can promote cancer in the user, or that if a woman has latent breast or uterine cancer (which can exist for six years prior to detection), estrogen may promote its growth. Yet it is known that about 225,000 American women presently have undiscovered breast cancer. Each year about 197,000 new cases of cancer of the estrogen-dependent organs are diagnosed in American women. Of these, 88,000 are breast cancer, 27,000 uterine lining cancer, 20,000 cervical in situ, 17,000 ovarian and 4,200 other genital organ cancer. That estrogen plays a role in cellular proliferation of these target organs has been known since the discovery of the hormone. Well-controlled epidemiological studies associating an increased incidence of some of these cancers with estrogen use are accruing at a rapid pace, but it has long been known that estrogens are carcinogenic in laboratory animals. The hazards of estrogen use are similar whether the estrogens are synthetic or natural, steroidal or nonsteroidal. To increase the body's estrogen level with even small amounts of estrogen profoundly affects the delicate hormonal balance on which 50 metabolic systems depend. The majority of estrogen prescriptions are written for healthy women for non-medical purposes. Ten million U.S. women take the oral contraceptive and eight million prescriptions annually are written to menopausal women for uses classified as "probably effective" by the FDA. About 40 million women have been given the suspect DES to help their breast milk dry up after childbirth, although the process would occur without the aid of a drug. Millions more take DES or other estrogens as a "morning-after pill" or to control real or perceived menstrual irregularities, or for cosmetic or quasi-medical uses like treatment of acne, thinning hair or premenstrual syndrome. Most of these uses have never been subjected to adequately controlled studies to prove their effectiveness. Cancer is not the only or even the major effect of prescribed estrogens. Stroke, heart attack, hypertension, thrombophlebitis, gall bladder disease, benign liver tumors, birth defects and a host of gynecological symptoms and metabolic di seases have been demonstrated to be caused by or associated with estrogen use. FDA approval of drugs is contingent, upon their manufacturer demonstrating that the benefits of the drug outweigh its risks to the consumer. That the pharmaceutical industry earns $120 million from the manufacture of oral contraceptives may make it difficult for industry scientists to reach an objective assessment of their risks. It will not be known whether the oral contraceptive increases the frequency of cancer until 20 years after marketing began. Recent studies, however, indicate that sequential oral contraceptives and estrogen replacement at menopause increase the risk of developing cancer of the uterine lining, cervix and breast. Evidence that physicians are misusing estrogens is available. In spite of studies which proved that DES was ineffective as an "anti-miscarriage" drug in the 1950s, physicians continued to prescribe it for 20 years. And in spite of the 1971 FDA ban on its use during pregnancy because of an epidemic of vaginal cancer in daughters of patients so treated, physicians continue to write about 11,000 prescriptions a year for D£S for "prenatal care." It would be unwise to repeat the tragic mistakes made with DES with other estrogen drugs. That lesson calls for increased conservatism in the use of hormones and research into safer methods of birth control. Public health measures such as full disclosure of the possible side effects of hormones and more stringent controls on marketing and use by physicians are recommended. WATCH WHAT HAPPENS WHEN DETERMINED WOMEN GETT0GETHER. There's sure to be plenty happening at the National Women's Conference, and you're not going to want to miss any of it. But you can't be everywhere at once. We can. Sara irowrey, Maria Sanchez and Sharon Speer of KPRC-TV will be on the floor every day. Then, they'll give you a complete look at what's been happening every evening on our 6:00 P.M. newscast. At 9:00 A.M. on Friday, November 18, we'll present a one-hour special called "Are You Listening?" hosted by Martha Stuart. Add to that the Big 2 News Conference, where we'll interview one of the more important delegates, and you'll see Channel 2 is the best place to get an overview of what's going on. After the day's sessions, settle down for a while. Turn on 2. Watch what happened. Then get ready for tomorrow. WATCH SARA L0WREY, MARIA SANCHEZ AND SHARON SPEER, KPRC-TV NEWSPERSONS, WITH FULL CONVENTION COVERAGE ON BIG 2 NEWS AT 6. Q« "We edit the Monitor so that the reader, when through, is not in a pit of despair'.' John Hughes Editor and Manager The Christian Science Monitor Isn't this the kind of news you've been needing? The Monitor focuses on significant regional, national, and international events, then gives its readers what they need: constructive, solution-oriented reporting. If you are interested in a clear, fair appraisal of your world, this award-winning newspaper should be your key daily news source. To subscribe to The Christian Science Monitor, just call toll free: 800-225-7090. Or use the coupon below. News.The way you need it. THE CHRISTIAN SCENCE MONITOR, I —' mm mm ■"■ — "" — —' — ""■ — ~~ "" mm THE CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR/ Box 20572, Houston, TX 77025 Please start the Monitor coming in the mail every Monday through Friday for: 3 months/$12.50 6 months/$25 9 months/$37.50 One year/$45-a $5 saving Signature D Check/money order enclosed* □ Bill me later Name (Please print) Street Apt. City State/Country *Outside U.S.A. use current local exchange rate. ZIP/Post Code PAGE 10 NOVEMBER 20, 1977 DAILY BREAKTHROUGH