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Daily Breakthrough, November 20, 1977
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Daily Breakthrough, November 20, 1977 - Page 10. November 20 1977. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 23, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/663/show/640.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(November 20 1977). Daily Breakthrough, November 20, 1977 - Page 10. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/663/show/640

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Daily Breakthrough, November 20, 1977 - Page 10, November 20 1977, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 23, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/663/show/640.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Daily Breakthrough, November 20, 1977
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date November 20 1977
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332726~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 10
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  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_535aj.jpg
Transcript Lifestyles Jean Lipman-Blumen introduced participant in Lifestyles-A Panel on Women's Choices as a "token somebody" representing a range of professional choices from homemaker to nun to prostitute. The lifestyles panel was one of the events scheduled yesterday at Seneca Falls South. Ronnie Haggerty, a working home- maker from Brooklyn, told the audience that she has been married 21 years and that after 20 years she was vested. She chose to be a homemaker, but within limits. "If your husband has a ring around the collar, maybe he ought to wash his neck," she pointed out. Consuelo Nieto said she was known for many years as Sister Maria. She decided that the church treated her "like a child" unfit to make decisions, and she left that lifestyle to develop her womanhood and personhood. Joan Goodin said she didn't realize that she represented a lifestyle until she was asked to speak on being a single working woman. She distinguished being alone from loneliness. She fantasizes about "federally funded feminist neighborhoods." A lesbian mother's role is inherently contradictory, said Jackie St. Joan, a lawyer who lives in the confusion that society attaches to lesbian motherhood. She pointed out that when one chooses to be a lesbian, the most significant part of the decision may be having to support oneself. Jinx Melia explained her "Martha Movement" for women at home. The group's concerns are the homemaker's isolation, her lack of access to information and representation,and her problems maintaining self-esteem despite financial dependency. Melia advocates programs to provide discretionary capital for women at the beginning, not only the end, of marriage. "I'm proud that I feed 60 people," said Naomi Christenson, a farmer. She gave an "Ain't I a Woman" speech, using images of modern farm machinery. "Sociologist at large" Jesse Bernard represented the "non-choice of widowhood.." She said, "Single parenting probably doesn't damage the child, but it certainly is hard on the parent." She recommended two to 10 parents per child. Margo St. James, founder of the prostitutes' union COYOTE, introduced herself as a farmer's daughter, showed the audience her biceps and said she'd, been a long-distance runner for 18 years. She sat on stage between the farmer and the homemaker. "They called me a whore before I learned to ask for the money," she said. "All women are stigmatized through their sexuality. We need to demystify prostitution." In her newsletter Coyote Howls, St. James speaks against discriminatory enforcement of prostitution laws. Asked whether her plan might encourage rape, she replied "I said decriminalize rape, not legalize. Women should have the choice to be mothers, lesbians, hookers, whatever." And the lifestyles panelists were proof of that. Deborah Diamond-Hicks Robert's Rules From the first bang of the gavel by Ruth Clusen, League of Women Voters president from Green Bay, Wise, the organizers of the IWY Conference seemed to be well-versed in parliamentary procedure and rules. Registered parliamentarians have for several years presided at NOW national board meetings and the League of Women Voters has been a long-time advocate of proper training in parliamentary law. The league president kept a firm hand on the convention gavel throughout the afternoon session and demanded that the IWY staff clear the convention floor of media during votes and keep aisles clear at all times. There appeared to be little caucusing on the floor. Most delegations said they had caucused prior to the afternoon session. That is not to say, however, that politicking was not going on. Several delegates' representatives told neighboring delegations not to vote for amendments to the resolutions as presented. It appeared to be the consensus of the ERA advocates that the resolutions as presented constituted their plank and they wanted to stick with it. In the opening instructions to the delegates, Clusen announced speakers would be given two minutes at a microphone for any given motion and the chair held rigidly--t& that to the dismay of the anti-ERA delegates. The convention floor looked remarkably like the floors of major political party* conventions with the exception that the1 delegate majority was women. The aisles appeared to be a game of red light-green light at times as delegates wishing to speak had to call for the proper color placard to be displayed—yellow indicating procedural questions, green representing opposition to a resolution, and blue cards indicating agreement. If indeed the rules can determine the game, by following the established rules of parliamentary procedure it would appear that ERA backers and Pro-Plan delegates are well on their way to finalizing a feminist-based, broad-spectrum document to send the President and Congress. Sue Kaufman * oerseas <S(///cat/ori 0ymd of the League of Women Voters The Overseas Education Fund of the League of Wortien Voters announces a new publication. The Women of Latin America 12pp, S.75 per copy also available Women in Indonesia 4pp, $.25 per copy Order from: The Overseas Education Fund of the League of Women Voters 2101 L Street, N.W. Suite 916 All orders prepaid Washington, D.C. 20037 Bulk rates available First of its kind: EQUALOGT CONTRACT I for Marrying, Married, or Cohabiting Adults Model agreement for living together equally, non sexist; Negotiation tool, discussion aid, relationship review, Do-It-Yourself work booklet with all tasks & roles negotiable. Sample agreements cover basic areas for living together, promote open exchange, reduce conflict & manipulation & lead to increased intimacy, autonomy & responsiveness. Legal precedents noted for feminist concepts, Humanistic guidelines for separation/divorce & reading references. Developed & tested professionally by J. & P. Baute. Copy $3.00 Quantity rates for classes & agencies; ask for lists of other forms & checklists used in developing awareness & communication skills in grps, edctn, cnslng. INSTITUTE FOR HUMAN RESPONSIVENFSS Dept. H, 6200 Winchester RoaH Lexington, KY 40511 Unitarian Universalist Women's Federation . . .a continental organization dedicated to uphold and extend the philosophy of liberal religion while stressing woman power potential. . . Current Program Focus: "A Ministry To, For, By, and Among Women," working towards solutions to problems faced by older and displaced women, passage of ERA and reasonable abortion laws, elimination of sexist stereotyping, and other concerns of girls and women in today's changing society. VISIT OUR BOOTH...No. 133 Booth co-sponsors: the Unitarian Universalist Association, Beacon Press, and the Unitarian Universalist Service Committee. PEACE Is a Woman's Issue It will be a great day when our schools get all the money they need. . . . and the air force has to hold a bake sale to buy a bomber. Booth 314 Women's International League for Peace and Freedom 1213 Race St., Philadelphia, PA 19107 SURVIVORS AND OTHER POEMS a new book of poetry by Carol Morizot Illustrated by Aravinda Chakravarti Available at major bookstores in Austin and Houston. Ask for it at your local bookstore or Please send me copies of Survivors and other poems, by Carol Ann Morizot at $3.95 per copy postpaid. Texas residents please add 20C sales tax per copy. Enclosed is my remittance of . \ Please send book(s) to: Name ■ 6 < 0O * o> • o . CO • C - o • 3 • O • -c • i * 2: - * 2 * 3 a. • v • 3 * o • JS • 1: order from harold house DAILY BREAKTHROUGH NOVEMBER 20, 1977 PAGE 9