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Daily Breakthrough, November 20, 1977
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Daily Breakthrough, November 20, 1977 - Page 8. November 20 1977. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 29, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/663/show/638.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(November 20 1977). Daily Breakthrough, November 20, 1977 - Page 8. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/663/show/638

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Daily Breakthrough, November 20, 1977 - Page 8, November 20 1977, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 29, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/663/show/638.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Daily Breakthrough, November 20, 1977
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date November 20 1977
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332726~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 8
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_535ah.jpg
Transcript their right to be there. And when they do, they start to question the word that for so many years has defined so many girls. Those of us who once wore the title "tomboy" with pride are wondering if we may have to find another name for the Girls of Summer. "I don't think there are any 'tomboys' anymore," said an 18-year-old high school student in Hastings, Nebraska. "Everyone is an individual. I never could understand why there was a 'name' for me and not for my brothers when we played the same games the same way. The word will soon be obsolete." A 10-year-old in Alaska defined a tomboy as a girl who "is really strong and acts like a boy and dresses like one, too." When asked if she met the qualifications she said no. Then she added, "If a boy bothers me, I'll just beat him up." In Ft. Lauderdale, Fla., an eight- year-old baseball player reluctantly admitted she was a tomboy, but added, "It's a bad word, like a curse word." When asked what was bad about it, she struggled for a moment and then said, "It's got boy in it." If the term tomboy is, as it appears, going the way of high school Latin, then perhaps it is because the boundaries between male and female turf are becoming blurry. The above was excerpted from "The Girls of Summer" which appeared in full in womenSports Magazine (August 1977). Caryl Rivers is the author of Aphrodite at Mid-Century, writer-in-residence at the Washington Star and a frequent contributor to Ms. and the New York Times Magazine. She received research assistance from womenSports stringers whose names appear with the original story. continued from page 14 than 20 per cent of art faculties are worn- em of which only 14 per cent have tenure; while over 50 per cent of professional artists are women, only two per cent of one- person shows of living artists are by women; in prestige galleries, only 15 per cent of one-person shows are by women. By 1974, the WCA's activities were potentially so explosive that the CAA asked them to separate from the group and. form their own body. Today, while there's overlap on boards and membership, the WCA and CAA are two separable groups, and the latter has academic qualifications not needed for WCA membership. In the past, the CAA included women's issues symposia in its annual national meeting while allowing the WCA to conduct three more sessions under the umbrella of the convention. This year, however, the WCA is conducting all women's issues discussions at the meeting to be held in New York, Jan. 25-28. They will include panels on feminist art history called "Questioning the Litany"; "Matronage: Women's Support for Women's Art"; and a panel of lawyers discussing court cases involving women art professionals. The group will also conduct seminars at the annual meeting of the Art Librarians Society of North America, including one called "The Art of Craft." Last spring, the WCA organized its first national exhibition "Contemporary Issues: Works on Paper by Women" to coincide with the CAA meeting in Los Angeles during the "Four Hundred Years of Art by Women: 1550-1950" exhibition at L.A. County Museum. The paper show is now on view at University of Houston's Blaffer Gallery. A second national exhibition focused on crafts will open Jan. 25 at the Bronx Museum to coincide with the CAA meeting. Like the "Works on Paper" show, the craft show is being selected by a group of jurors from across the country. But, the biggest political step the WCA has taken is spearheading the formation of the Coalition of Women's Art Groups which will be officially convened for the first time in January by Joan Mon- dale. Along with New York's Women in Art Group and WEB, WCA sees the group as serving as an effective lobbying voice in Washington for women artists. Already, more than 100 women's art groups have responded to the coalition. Although individuals are encouraged to join membership grou?s, an individual Friends category is available for $10. Group membership is $20. In the meantime, the Women's Caucus for Art is expanding. There are chap= ters in New York, New Jersey, Philadelphia, Florida, Chicago, Kansas City, Akron, Los Angeles, San Francisco and under way in Utah, Arizona, San Antonio, Ann Arbor and E. Lansing. For membership information, write Judith Brodsky at 59 Castle Howard Court, Princeton, N.J. 08540. Media survey Join with us in a national survey of media coverage of the IWY Conference. Send clippings, pictures, examples of broadcast coverage in your area to: Paula Kassell, c/o New Directions for Women, Box 27, Dover, NJ. 07801. (A national project of the Women's Institute for Freedom of the Press.) Ms. MAGAZINE CONGRATULATES THE WOMEN WHO HAVE COME TO HOUSTON TO MOVE HISTORY FORWARD IN THE NOVEMBER ISSUE: COUNTDOWN TO HOUSTON: MEMO FOR THE FIRST NATIONAL WOMEN'S CONFERENCE COMING UP IN DECEMBER. SPECIAL ISSUE: THE ARTS EXPLOSION WILL CHANGE YOUR LIFE! Ms. Magazine. A good place to find yourself. DAILY BREAKTHROUGH NOVEMBER 20, 1977 PAGE 7