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Daily Breakthrough, November 20, 1977
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Daily Breakthrough, November 20, 1977 - Page 2. November 20 1977. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 27, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/663/show/632.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(November 20 1977). Daily Breakthrough, November 20, 1977 - Page 2. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/663/show/632

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Daily Breakthrough, November 20, 1977 - Page 2, November 20 1977, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 27, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/663/show/632.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Daily Breakthrough, November 20, 1977
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date November 20 1977
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332726~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
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Title Page 2
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File Name femin_201109_535ab.jpg
Transcript Pro-plan progress By Cheryl Knott and Janet Sanders Forces favoring the Equal Rights Amendment managed to outclass opponents to pass their resolution as stated in the National Plan of Action after two hours of parliamentary maneuvering. The IWY Plenary Sessions were slowed to a crawl by a minority of delegates at times, but Pro-Plan conferees still guided nearly half the 26 resolutions through the conference substantially unchanged. Besides the one endorsing ratification of the ERA, measures passed included calls for legislation supporting battered women, federally funded child care, protection for abused children and full employment for women. But more procedural delays and extended debate were expected for at least two remaining resolutions—Reproductive Freedom and Sexual Preference, concerning abortion and gay rights, respectively. The pro-ERA faction anticipated dis- sention on the floor, and some believed rumors that right-wing anti-ERA forces planned to provoke a confrontation. Many delegates remained in their seats during the dinner break to keep out supposed busloads of antis intended to stack the meeting hall crowd at the nationally televised event. The buses never materialized, however, and the anti-ERA minority proved to be less potent than assumed. Discussion of the ERA resolution began with a few inept attempts by individual foes to manipulate procedure as a stalling tactic. They stepped to the microphones time and again to complain that their opinions were not being heard, while session chairperson Mary Anne Krupsak, lieutenant governor of New York, answered them quickly and moved on to the next speaker. Speakers had to know exactly what they wanted to say, with no introductory complaints, or the next speaker was given the floor. Anticipation grew all night, reaching a peak when Mildred Jefferson, a delegate from Massachusetts and president of the Pro-Life movement, made a play for the spotlight by parading alone down the aisle to her seat. She had refused to be seated for at least half an hour before while other resolutions were being passed. Pro-ERA forces chanted "ERA NOW" while Jefferson walked to her seat, drowning out any show of unity the anti forces might have mustered. Serious discussion of the resolution finally began with a move to amend the resolution to include the controversial seven-year ratification extension. Boundaries between the two groups blurred momentarily until Betty Friedan, so-called mother of the feminist movement, made an impassioned speech from the floor. The ERA must be passed this coming year, Friedan told the expectant crowd, "because otherwise the enormous expenditure of energy, money and effort that has gone into this conference will be in v4in. This is the one issue that is real, that is urgent, that cannot in any way be ignored cr be defeated or by flirted with." The crowd made its decision then. The amendment was defeated. Debate on the resolution as stated in the proposed National Plan of Action began. The resolution in its entirety encompasses seven words: "The Equal Rights Amendment should be ratified." The next speaker supported the ERA resolution saying, "I'm a delegate from Wisconsin where we say that Equal Rights are as American as apple pie." Another delegate told the approving crowd, "I am a Mormon woman speaking for the ERA." Two attempts were made to stem the tide of confident pro-ERA delegates. A delegate from Indiana who identified herself as "chairman" of the National Association of Lawyers to Oppose the ERA, said the amendment would transfer power from the states to the federal government. An Illinois delegate, saying she was "chairman" of the National Citizens Review Committee, read two proposed amendments which were in direct opposition to the resolution. Her revisions maintained that equal credit and employment rights laws exist already and that only the federal government would acquire greater power. Krupsak requested copies in triplicate of the amendments, which is usual parliamentary procedure. After the minority's repeated attempts to get the amendments into proper form for submitting to the delegates, Krupsak finally gave up, saying she had gone out of her way to allow the opposition a voice. There was no more time to waste. The next delegate moved the ERA resolution be approved, and backers vocally stood to vote "yes," adding plenty of vocal reinforcement. The Sam Houston Coliseum reverberated with "Ratify ERA," a chant that turned into "Three More States" as the demonstration of support continued for several minutes. National Organization for Women past-president Karen DeCrow led a dancing chain of women down the floor aisles, while the California delegation waved yellow scarves and other delegates and observers held up three fingers representing the number of states still needed for ratification. The anti-ERA groups sat quietly throughout the jubilee. It was the end of a long day of plenary sessions. The following resolutions also passed with no more than minor changes from the National Plan of Action: Arts and Humanities More women should be more adequately represented at high-level positions in libraries, museums, universities and other cultural institutions. Battered Women Emergency shelters should be set up for battered women and their children. A victim of her husband's physical abuse should be allowed to sue for civil damages. Business More government contracts should be awarded to women-owned businesses. Private contracting agencies should be directed to do the same, and monitoring programs should be set up to see that they do so. Child Abuse Programs designed to protect neglected or abused children and children exploited for pornography should be set up to operate on a 24-hour basis. Police and courts should take prompt, sensitive action against the abuser. Child Care Federally funded child care programs should be developed for all those who need them, regardless of income. Special child care facilities should be set up for rural and migrant workers. Credit The Federal Equal Credit Opportunity Act of 1974 which prohibits discrimination in the extension of credit on the basis of sex should be vigorously enforced. Disabled Women Medicaid and Medicare benefits should be extended to cover all medical expenses of disabled women. And the federal government should provide them with enough financial assistance so that they can choose between institutional and private care. Education All laws prohibiting discrimination at all levels of education should be enforced and women's studies programs should be promoted. Non-sexist and non-racist counseling should be available at every level. Elective and Appointive Office An effort by the President, governors, political parties, women's organizations and individual women should be made to get greater numbers of women into public office. DAILY BREAKTHROUGH NOVEMBER 20, 1977 PAGE 1