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University News, Vol. 2, No. 3, March 1982
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University News, Vol. 2, No. 3, March 1982 - Page 6. March 1982. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 26, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/6335/show/6332.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(March 1982). University News, Vol. 2, No. 3, March 1982 - Page 6. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/6335/show/6332

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

University News, Vol. 2, No. 3, March 1982 - Page 6, March 1982, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 26, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/6335/show/6332.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title University News, Vol. 2, No. 3, March 1982
Publisher National Organization for Women, University of Houston Chapter.
Date March 1982
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Women--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • National Organization for Women
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location HQ1101 .N684
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1476015~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
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Title Page 6
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File Name femin_201109_223f.jpg
Transcript Proposal would drop confidential sex-related help to teen-agers Sunday, January 17/1982 BYKITMINICLIER © 1982, Denver Post Houston Chronicle Teen-agers under 18 could no longer get confidential help fram the nation's 5,000 federally assisted family planning clinics under a regulation proposed by Secretary of Health and Human Services Richard Schweiker. The proposed rule would affect more than 675.000 sexually active teen-agers who annually seek confidential birth control help from clinics that get federal funds. Family planning officials fear that the proposed loss of confidentiality could cut in half the number of teen-agers seeking family planning help, provide a bonanza for abortion clinics and ultimately increase the welfare roles through unwanted pregnancies among parents who cannot support children. Under the proposed new regulation, a copy of which was made available to the Denver Post, family-planning clinics would be required to notify parents of children seeking help within 10 days after the patients had received birth control devices or prescription drugs for treatment of venereal diseases. The proposal, approved by Schweiker Dec. 21, has not been published in the Federal Register, the journal in which changes in government regulations formally are announced. The public will have 60 days to comment on the new rule after publication, and the agency then can adopt a final regulation. A 1980 national survey of unmarried patients under the age of 18 found that 46 percent had not told their parents they were seeking help at family planning clinics, according to Aida Torrez, senior research associate at the Alan Guttmacher Institute in New York. The institute, a privately funded corporation for research on population issues, estimates that 400,000 unintended teen pregnancies were averted in 1979 because the clinics provided timely advice and assistance in preventing pregnancies. A total of 4.5 million women, 77 percent of them in the low- income bracket — meaning a gross income of $125 a week for a single woman living atone — visited family planning clinics supported by federal funds in 1979. Fifteen percent of them — 675.000 — were under 18, Torrez said. Language in the Schweiker proposal says it was designed to implement an amendment to the Public Health Service Act. passed by Congress last August. That amendment says, "To the* extent practical, entities which receive grants or contracts under this subsection shall encourage family participation in projects assisted under this subsection." Schweiker's plan would make parental notification manrlatn* ry. Exceptions to the mandatory-notification rule would be grant, ed only in cases where a clinic director "determine* that notfy fication would have adverse physical health consequences on Uatv minor." Threat to Teenage Health Continues This outrageous proposal rules that federally funded clinics will close their doors on teen-agers seeking confidential help and birth control methods. This means that not only abortions will be greatly increased, but also that many teen-agers will be forced into premature motherhood. This proposal is by now published in the Federal Register and is open for public comment. Your response is needed during the 60 day comment period after which Health and Human Services will decide on its final regulation. A large public outcry will influence their decision. Please contact Rossann Daumas at 924-5177 (10am-3pm) for information on where to send your written comments. Rossann Daumas Reagan's new world for women By Georgia Anne Geyer ■ The administration has made-1* clear that it does not want the Equal Rights Amendment. In this, as in other areas of concern to women, it has worked quietly but effectively, tending to win by omission, by holding back pressure for action on women's issues and by appointing ulrraconservatives to key posts that do the work for the White House. ■ Title DC, the crucial legislation thai provided that educational institutions could not discriminate on the basis et sex. Is being allowed, like so many other tilings, to wither on the vine. The administration has signaled to institutions that they need not comply with Title DC; and when there are no concerted pressures from Washington for implementation, legislation like this simply dies. This is what Is happening with Title DC. «4] ■ Women who have struggled the test decade-to reach higher levels in federal' employment have been swept away in extraordinary numbers by the job reductions under the Reagan admrnistratioit Affirmative action for women is basically dead. Ironically, the big women's appointment — that of Judge Sandra Day O'Connor to the Supreme Court — Tlas turned out to be Just the kind of symbol:* ic or token appointment that the Reagan conservatives always criticized on the! part of the liberals ■ The right to abortion Is being taken apart piecemeal. And close to criminal is the proposal now put forward by the Department of Health and Human Serv ices. The proposal, which is being seriously considered, would require parents to be Informed when teen-agers under IS request prescription birth control products. Civil rights nominee against ERA, gay issues WASrHNGTON'(AP) - B. Sam Hart, nominated to the U.S. Civil Rights Commission by President Reagan, was quoted as saying he opposes the Equal Rights Amendment and busing for school integration and doesn't believe homosexuals have a civil rights cause. Hart, a radio preacher and owner of radio station WtTS in Philadelphia, also said he agrees with Reagan's position that Congress, not the administration or the courts, should deny tax exemptions to private schools that practice racial discrimination. Nominated Tuesday by Reagan, he spoke to the press Wednesday at the convention of the National Religious Broadcasters. Today's editions of The Washington Post contained an account of his remarks. "I am all for equal rights (but) I do not equate equal rights with the amendment," Hart was quoted as saying. "I don't see the need for an amendment." On busing, he said that while he supports school integration, the government ''shouldn't force citizens to do anything they don't want to do." Hart said a better approach to desegregation is integration of communities by providing guaranteed mort- ages at below-market rates to people of one race who move into a neighborhood dominated by another race. "I do not consider homosexuality a civil rights issue," he-said, adding that all expert opinion holds that 'homosexuals are not bom" but are the product of their environment. VI am black; I cannot change that. That's a civil, rights issue," Hart said- A woman likewise may have a - civil rights cause because she did not choose her gender,' hesaid. Homosexuals, ho waver r." have chosen a way of life," Hart said "They have to accept the consequences." Asked if a homosexual has any rights, he replied: "He has the right to live. He has the right to eat. The right to work. The nght to live someplace." Hart said, however, that homosexuals should be kept away from children in order not to expose them to environmental factors that might cause them to •become homosexual. Frat sign indicative of what keeps women 'one step lower9than men To the editor: In response to Roger Geer's letter (Cougar, Feb. rO),- as the editor pointed out, Ms. Griffin's ideas were in an editorial, not a straight news story. In fact, the title of the page is "Opinion," so why shouldn't she or anyone else use that column to give their opinion? The "jugs" part of the sign announcing the fraternity's party was offensive to me and to many women I've talked to. There's no way of getting around it: when "jugs" is used in that context — jugs (of booze) — it implies women's breasts. I don't think men would appreciate jokes about their anatomy, any more than women enjoy being the brunt of jokes. The men that make the jokes usually don't understand how they could be offensive. One fraternity member and I were discussing the sign and the letters in the Cougar, and he said he didn't think the sign was sexist. In the same breath, he said, "Sex sells." Unfortunately, that's true. That seems to indicate a lack of concern of whom the advertising insults. I don't mean to imply that all men make degrading remarks about women or discriminate against them. There are a lot of men who actively support the Feminist Movement. However, many men don't understand why women fed exploited because they have never been exploited themselves. The same fraternity had a "bring your own bra" party a week or two after the topless party. That's just about as bad, because the female body was still the brunt of the joke. Somehow, the only counterpart to that that I can think of is a "bring your own jockstrap" party for women, and I think that's pretty disgusting. Advertising and jokes like this are what keep women one step lower on the ladder than men. In the Civil Rights Movement, no one ever said to blacks, "Come on, you can sit at the front of the bus, be served here, go to school here, etc. ' Blacks had to Tight for the passage of the Civil Rights Amendment, just like women are having to fight for the passage of the Equal Rights Amendment. What is peculiar is that: the majority supports the ERAi, but' are generally apathetic about it, so that the minority who oppose it seem stronger than they really are. The public must be made aware of offensive advertising, especially commercials depicting women as being good only for washing. men's collars and cooking supper. Other offenses include women being called "girl." (How many men do you know are called "boy?") Awareness will bring about change, and that change will be accelerated by the passage of the ERA. The following is the complete text of the ERA: "Section- 1: Equality of rights under the law shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any state on account of sex. Section 2: The Congress shall have the power to enforce, by appropriate legislation, the provisions of this article. Section 3: This amendment shall take effect two years after the date of ratification." Without this, women do not have any protection under the Constitution. It's amazing that an amendment so simple, so positive, and so supported by the majority of people, has not been passed since it was first introduced in the 1920s. America is supposedly a modern country, but 51 percent of the population (women) have fewer rights than the other 49 percent. Marie Tithe .'M Student and NOW member Feb at (9<n^