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University News, Vol. 2, No. 3, March 1982
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University News, Vol. 2, No. 3, March 1982 - Page 4. March 1982. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 26, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/6335/show/6330.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(March 1982). University News, Vol. 2, No. 3, March 1982 - Page 4. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/6335/show/6330

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

University News, Vol. 2, No. 3, March 1982 - Page 4, March 1982, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 26, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/6335/show/6330.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title University News, Vol. 2, No. 3, March 1982
Publisher National Organization for Women, University of Houston Chapter.
Date March 1982
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Women--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • National Organization for Women
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location HQ1101 .N684
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1476015~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
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Title Page 4
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File Name femin_201109_223d.jpg
Transcript Sciences get more women, minorities WASHINGTON (AP) — The percentages of women and racial minorities employed as scientists and engineers have increased markedly since 1974, but the actual numbers remain relatively small, says a National Science Foundation report. The report to Congress issued Saturday, termed the most comprehensive of its kind, said minorities and females are'making gains in technical fields, but the progress Is slow. Each group makes up less than 10 percent of the science and engineering work force, makes less money than comparable' white males and is under- represented In management positions, the figures Indicate. The foundation, which funds much of the country's baric research and monitors the state of the nation's science, was directed by Congress in 1961 to do such a manpower report every two years. The report primarily covered data from 1974 to 1978 from many sources, but also included some information up to 1980. Dr. John B. Slaughter, foundation director, said there has long been a concern about the scientific talent the nation loses in the underrepresentation of women and minorities. Pre-college preparation, the lack of role models, expected job opportunities and other social and cultural variables seem to be factors in keeping women and minorities out of technical training, the report said. These groups tended to take fewer math and science courses in high school and college, and tended to study In the social sciences rather than the physical: sciences, it said. Despite difficulties, the number of women scientists and engineers employed at all degree levels increased almost 32 percent (to 232,000) between 1974 and 1978. But this increase brought women up to only 9.4 percent of the total scientific work force, the report said. During.the same period, employment of engineers and scientists from racial minorities rose almost 25 percent, to 39,000. But this increased their share of the science and engineering work force only to about 4 percent, said the study. Taken by themselves, blacks represented only 1.6 percent of the total technical workforce by 1978, it continued. Like women, blacks tended to be concentrated in the social sciences and psychology. In these fields, blacks represent about 5 percent of the total, but in engineering they make up only about 1 percent. In terms of salary, women, scientists and engineers received about 80 percent of the amount paid to men. Unemployment figures also were higher for women, 2.4 percent compared with L3 percent Jor males. Racial minorities also received lower salaries than whites in most cases. Among those in the labor force since 1970, blacks got an average of $24,900 annually compared with $27,300 for whites. Black engineers were an exception in that they generally received slightly higher salaries than wh ee, the report noted. LESBIAN/GAY CIVIL RIGHTS Hearings were held on January 28 on H.R. 1454. This bill is called the Weis/Waxman Gay Civil Rights Legislation. It would amend the Civil Rights Act of 1964 to prohibit discrimination on the basis of "affect- ional or sexual orientation" in employment, housing, public facilities, and federally-assisted programs. While this bill does not stand a good chance of being passed by the House, it does provide an excellent opportunity to raise the issue with legislators and provide some education. Hearings are one of the primary methods legislators use to learn about issues. Some key points to include when writing your congress- person are - Discrimination against any group in a society affects all people living in that society adversely. - A majority of Americans support Lesbian/Gay civil rights (for information on the polls, see Lesbian Rights Resource Kit at NOW's desk in Campus Activities, Underground UC.) - The economic impact of Discrimination is disastrous. Twenty million Americans face the threat of losing their jobs regardless of job performance should their sexual preference become known. (We are including the addresses of Texas Congressper- sons so you can write to yours about this. Heterosexual women must - in their own interest - write also. There is no defense against being labeled "Lesbian" and uppity feminists surely will be. For anyone who needs more information on why this is important to all feminists, we have articles and position papers at NOW desk on campus.) Re Senate Vote reported'on page 7: Who do they think they are kidding?Millions of rural children are bussed many more miles and many more minutes to give them a quality education. It's only when we try to achieve integration-quality 'that rides are too long. BYCLAYROBISON Chronkk Staff U.S. Rep. Shirley Chisholm, has accused the Reagan admimstration of "destroying the quality of life for America;particularly for the poor, ethnic minor-- ities and women. "Many of the things we (blacks and women) have gained in the past 15 years are ! on the legislative or executive i assault," Chisholm told a luncheon audience Friday at the Shamrock Hilton. The meeting was sponsored by the Congressional Black Caucus and the Minority Women's Association. At a news conference later, she stopped short of calling President Reagan a racist, but said his actions "lead me Chisholm ! to think there are some racial overtones." Chisholm, who in 1968 became the first black woman to win election to the U.S. House, announced earlier this week that she would not seek another term. On Friday, she indicated her future activities would include organizational work for female political candidates, but she declined to specify her plans. "This is not my funeral," she said. Chisholm, who canipaigned in 29 states during a presidential campaign of her own in 1972, said there was a bloodless "revolution" taking place in Washington. "The restructuring of the federal government under the guise of the New Federalism concept is actually destroying the quality of life for America," she said. She also called Reagan's New Federalism "another name for a return to states' rights" and blasted the adniinistration-sponsored tax cuts as "fraud and deception being perpetrated on the American people." "They are designed to benefit primarily thoset individuais in the $0,000 per year bracket or better,"* shesaid. Chisholm warned that the Republican administration has embarked on a military spending program that could result in federal expenditures of $1 trillion , or almost 60 percent of the budget, on defense by IMS to the further detriment of social programs. "How can you be like Rip Van Winkle when this type of program is moving and we are in peacetime?" she asked, urging her listeners to wake up, do their "home-' work'' and study congressional voting records. The congresswoman said sexism was 'alive and1 kicking" in Washington and cited administration plans to change Title 9 of Education Act. That legislation was* enacted in 1972 to prohibit discrimination based on gender at schools and universities receiving federal ftinds. One proposed change, she said, would require that only programs receiving federal funds, not the entire