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Houston Breakthrough, May 1979
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Houston Breakthrough, May 1979 - Page 23. May 1979. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. January 28, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/630/show/624.

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(May 1979). Houston Breakthrough, May 1979 - Page 23. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/630/show/624

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough, May 1979 - Page 23, May 1979, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed January 28, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/630/show/624.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough, May 1979
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date May 1979
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
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Title Page 23
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Transcript Mapping charts how you learn by Judith Richards "I'm curious about my abilities, " says public relations specialist Imelda Dykes. "I need reassurance that 'Yes, I can learn.' And not only that, I want to learn the most effective way. If I learn best from listening, I don't want to buy a book on the subject. Ill go to a seminar." Dykes is considering being "mapped." Mapping isn't a new therapy of the Me Decade. It's a way to learn how you learn best. "As far as I know, cognitive-style mapping (CSM) is available commercially in only one other place in the United States," says Pamela Hamilton, founder of Learning Unlimited. When Hamilton set up the business in 1976, she got the blessings of CSM's developer, midwest mathematician-educator, Dr. Joseph Hill. Although his cognitive-style mapping process has been used in education for about 25 years, Hamilton was first in the country to form a business based on the CSM learning theory and measurement instrument. "Learning is simply taking in data," Hamilton says. "It includes all the ways we pick up and process information around us. It goes on all the time, mostly without our being aware of it. We learn from a chat with a friend on the phone, and by reading a billboard message on the way to work. Ideally, learning is automatic, an osmosis. If the situation is right, learning is almost effortless." For most of us, this is rare, she adds. The situation is almost never completely right. Often, there is a block in our learning process. If you work best alone, and you're supposed to develop a project as part of a team, you might be experiencing a problem with your job. Hamilton hesitates to use the word "problem." She emphasizes that there's no right or wrong way to learn. Being most effective is understanding and using the ways you learn naturally to best advantage in your own situation. Usually, however, Hamilton asks at the interview whether there's a specific prob- lem-in the classroom, at home, at the office-that you'd like help in solving. It might be that you'd want to know if your children could benefit from learning how to take notes. You might find out that you are predisposed to distractions, such as noticing the traffic outside your office window, or the feel of your writing pen, and want to figure out ways to deal with that. You might want to determine if an associate would perform better if you gave him or her a reason to do a particular assignment. "I wanted to know if I was an effective teacher," says marketing consultant Vicki Keltner. "And I wanted to learn how to be better. I found out that I learn best by listening. So that's how I taught. Now I realize that I have people who need visuals, and I'm more careful to write on the blackboard, to pass out written material, and to not be so bothered by all that rustling paper when the visual learners do their thing." "Testing," or taking the mapping instrument is the second part of the cognitive-style mapping process. The test is simple-answering a series of questions and marking checks on an answer sheet. Though questions vary, they might include, "Do you usually have an easy time putting together puzzles?" or "Are you the first person in a room to comment on a certain odor?" From this test, Hamilton uses a simple scoring system to fill in a chart, your cognitive-style map. The map comprises several types of information: your theoretical basis for learning (Do you learn words and numbers by hearing them or by seeing them on paper?); your sensory intake, coordination, and attitudes or values; the cultural determinants of your decision-making (Are your choices more influenced by friends, family, neither?); and your thinking patterns, or "modalities of inference." Hamilton notes that, as part of her arrangement with Dr. Hill, she has kept his terminology. So the map reads in a fairly formidable fashion. For example, one item, Q(CS) Qualitative/Code Syn- noetics, translates, "How well do you know yourself?" If you rate low in no. 10 Qualitative Proprioceptive and no. 16 Code Kinesthetic, you'd better not take tennis lessons. Or at least, Hamilton says, find a teacher who'll just draw a big circle on the opposite court and say, "OK, hit the ball till you get it into the circle." These two items have to do with your ability to synthesize physical actions and coordinate them according to a recommended form. What the map means is explained in the feedback session. Looking over your map, you can tell quickly in which areas you learn almost automatically, in which you have adequate receptivity, and in which you receive little or no information from your environment. For instance, some people instinctively categorize when they learn something new. Keltner says, "I found out that I learn by analogy. I say, 'This is like. . .' Now I understand why I could never remember jokes and stories." Other people learn by amassing example after example. They get meaning from synthesizing many incidents. Some people need time to analyze and question material before they decide about it. Others prefer to make snap judgments. For some people, the self-awareness that came from mapping has helped, even without an in-depth analysis of their cognitive style. "I found out that I'm super sensitive to sounds," says Diane Dillon, director of Pearl School. "I just take them in automatically. I went to see Superman a couple weeks ago and went crazy because a baby behind me cried the whole time. The person I was with didn't hear it. Absolutely didn't notice. "Applied to my everyday work, this understanding of how I am has helped me cope. Now I hear all the noises and can just let go. Now I still register all the noises, but I accept it, and say, 'Oh, that's just the way it is for me.' And somehow, it's not so frustrating." For Evelyn Cox, partner of Creative Speech, Inc., mapping also cut down on anxiety. "It has helped me in that I don't have to worry about some things now," she says. "For example, I'm an auditory learner. When I hear a speech, I don't have any doubts at all if it's organized or not. I can tell just by listening. Many times in the past I'd take notes just because I thought I should take notes. I really didn't need to. Now I know it's OK not to. If I don't understand the lecture, probably nobody in the room does either." Mapping can have practical benefits to people. One Houston bookstore owner PAMELA HAMILTON (second from left), director of Learning Unlimited discusses the theory of mapping with (1 to r) marketing consultant VICKI KELTNER, EVELYN COX of Creative Speech Interests and DIANA DILLON, director of Pearl School. increased her sales after she was mapped. She used information about her own learning style to make changes in her dealings with book dealers and with her own customers. A corporate secretary having trouble chairing her first committee, requested that the group be mapped. After the process was completed, divisiveness stopped. The group task was achieved with such good results that the woman was given special commendation at the end of the project. Being able to work with people who would have been stumbling blocks before is definitely an advantage of mapping, says Hamilton. "For example," she says, "mapping showed me that an associate who had often been late or no-show for appointments had a completely different sense of time from mine. So, based on this understanding, we negotiated a way to handle our mutual schedules that worked." Mapping has been valuable in work with high school students. Hamilton uses it with individuals to conquer learning problems and with groups to prepare for college entrance exams. One young client had gotten scores back several times before she enrolled in the ACT-SAT Study Program. After preparing for the test according to her own learning style, she scored high enough to get into the school she wanted to go to. Another young girl was bright but having trouble with eighth-grade math. Mapping pointed up that her creative, hip-hop patterns of thinking and poor auditory skills needed to be handled before she could get to the content of her courses. "Hamilton's approach has been very helpful to Janet," says the girl's mother, Celia Grigsby. "My daughter knows now how she reasons and how she can develop study habits to compensate for her lack of skill in math." Several people think that mapping can be of greatest benefit in the area of corporate training. Keltner says, "I think what Hamilton is doing is dynamite, especially applied to training courses for a company. She says there are about 3000 different learning styles, but basically they can be divided into two categories: visual or audible. If you could know how people in a group learn, you could present material to them that way and be much more effective." Cox agrees that mapping has a real potential in employee relations. "It's helpful because it enables you to discover how to train your employees. If a person learns better with a written message, it'd be worth the extra time to write it. The message would stick." All three principals of Creative Speech are knowledgeable about communications, says Cox but they still benefitted from being mapped. "It was a reinforcement of our understanding of ourselves," she says. "One of us has to write things down. Before, I'd become impatient. Now I don't. I just accept it." Pearl School's Dillon is planning to have her entire staff mapped for next year. "I'm looking forward to that," she says. "I'm really curious to see what it tells us about each other. Then I'll know which person I can give just verbal messages to and be sure they get them." Hamilton uses information gleaned from mapping to make her own organization more efficient. Although she needs to put notes on paper to remember them, a fellow worker can get it all verbally. So she writes the message and reads it to him. He remembers, and she keeps the note. Several women commented that the information they got from mapping was not new to them, but they benefitted from having it reinforced in a more scientific form. "I intuit how people learn," says Cox. "I have known that people had different learning styles and have used that understanding over the years. But it's much more sophisticated if you can be mapped. "I think mapping is really an innovative idea," she says. "It has taken something that's intuitive with many people and put it into a form so that a person who's not especially intuitive can use it to great advantage," Cognitive-style mapping can offer women a fresh perspective on how they learn and new ideas about how to cope more effectively with the learning styles of people around them. Judith Richards is a freelance writer. Houston Breakthrough 23 May 1979