Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Houston Breakthrough, May 1979
Page 20
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Houston Breakthrough, May 1979 - Page 20. May 1979. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 17, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/630/show/621.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(May 1979). Houston Breakthrough, May 1979 - Page 20. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/630/show/621

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough, May 1979 - Page 20, May 1979, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 17, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/630/show/621.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Houston Breakthrough, May 1979
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date May 1979
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 20
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_550as.jpg
Transcript George Mello KPFTFM by Dan Bowen KPFT is Houston's one-of-a-kind radio station. Broadcasting at a frequency of 90.1 FM, KPFT is the sole non-commercial, listener- sponsored station in the city. It is one of five national affiliates of the non-profit Pacifica Foundation, based in Berkeley, California and last month KPFT celebrated its ninth year on the air. Nestled in the heart of Montrose, the station has not always enjoyed the complacency it does now. KPFT has overcome major obstacles to fulfill its primary objective, to be a radio station of the people, zeroing in on all aspects and facets of the community. Over the years, KPFT has survived such incidents as the infamous bombings of the transmitter in May and October of 1970, and a three-week employee strike in the fall of 1971. People are the spark of KPFT's fire. The staff with the priceless aid of a hundred volunteers or so combine their efforts to assure the station's existence, acceptance and accessibility. Listeners give monthly donations to make the station tick 24 hours a day. Many of KPFT's on-air personalities, clerical help, engineers, telephone operators, production assistants, and the rest of the KPFT gamut were all listeners of the station at one time. Interim general manager, Margaret (Margie) Glaser, is one of two women in the Houston market to be general manager of a radio station. Glaser initially came to KPFT around the time of the bombings. She was a "housewife," volunteered and started out answering the telephone. The only requirement for becoming active at KPFT, she says, is proving a desire to work in radio. Apart from her managerial role, Glaser hosts the Jazz Progressions and Houston/World shows. News Producer Jenai Rasmussen has been with KPFT for nine months of her two-year training grant from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. She has been active in community radio for over five years and worked with 55 community sta- While at the National Public Radio Network (NPR) in Washington, D.C, she worked on Folk Festival U.S.A. and Jazz Alive! KPFT currently carries both programs from NPR. On KPFT Rasmussen is host of Morning Magic with Jenai. But, that is just a fraction of her participation at the station. She produces the midday and evening news and presently is submerged in an orientation project for new KPFT volunteers. Rasmussen related she once thought she would never return to community radio after a period of absence. "But I realized I hadn't gone the full cycle," she said. Her return to community radio was to "give back" what she had learned. "I was in a learning phase, now I'm in a knowing phase," she commented. The orientation program is one of her ways of doing just that. A system to explain the radio station to newcomers, a guide book for the volunteers, and a slide show are all in the works. "I'm basically here to promote radio. That's what my grant is for," she said. Two months ago, when asked to host a radio show, Ed Falk, KPFT's "token conservative" said, "Are you kidding me, that liberal station?" Now, he feels, "Stations like KPFT prevent corruption." tions across the country, while she served on the Steering Committee of the National Federation of Community Broadcasting (NFCB). NFCB lobbies nationally for community radio stations. "Community radio serves broad-based needs in the community to get voices heard on a variety of topics," Rasmussen stressed. Rasmussen feels KPFT is "fairly well along" in comparison to other community radio stations. "There's a good staff of people." In her opinion, the station needs to direct some concentration in the areas of station structure and ascertainment of community needs. "We need more women on the air," she stated. The uniqueness of KPFT-the diverse programming of on-the-air matter and the atmosphere of the place itself—is perhaps the secret of the station's community support. Listeners support the station, not advertisers. "KPFT has the laid-back format," says Jerome Herbage, a listener for five years, programming is something you can't find anywhere else. KPFT relates to me as a person, not a commodity." "It's different! What I hear, I don't hear anywhere else," echoes Scottie Stapleton, also a listener for five years. As interim program director, Scott Cluthe is responsible, in part, for the programs listeners hear. Cluthe himself listened before he volunteered five years later. Cluthe took a job as a waiter to support himself while he worked at KPFT He decided, "Commercial radio was too open- ended," but calls KPFT "a real life college of communication. "You find your own space at KPFT.. . a timeless feeling," said Cluthe, the host of Vibrations (Wednesday evening, 10 p.m.) which features "interviews with those involved in the pursuit of higher consciousness." Cluthe's programming schedule of music, talk, and specials is as varied as the individuals connected with it. On the music side there's jazz, bluegrass, reggae, blues, classical, Latin, country and western, rock 'n roll, folk and Broadway musicals. The only Houston radio show featuring Gypsy music is hosted by musician Greg Harbar on KPFT (Sundays, noon-1 p.m.). Harbar's Gypsy Caravan highlights Gypsy music, live bands and guests. Records played on the show come from Harbar's personal library of over 3500 albums. Harbar is also creator of a group called, appropriately enough, Gypsies. They recently have returned from an engagement aboard a Caribbean cruise ship and play Houston Breakthrough 20 May 1979