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Houston Breakthrough, May 1979
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Houston Breakthrough, May 1979 - Page 13. May 1979. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. January 28, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/630/show/615.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(May 1979). Houston Breakthrough, May 1979 - Page 13. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/630/show/615

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough, May 1979 - Page 13, May 1979, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed January 28, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/630/show/615.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough, May 1979
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date May 1979
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
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Title Page 13
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File Name femin_201109_550am.jpg
Transcript Madeline Bass-Framson's involvement in anti-nuclear activities began years ago before the public had any awareness of atomic power plants and facilities. Today Framson, one of the most active environmentalists in the state, is directly involved in the issue of nuclear development. Framson is a member of the Board of Trustees for the Texas Committee on Natural Resources. She is currently involved in the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) hearings concerning the proposed development of an Aliens Creek nuclear power plant. "The proposed nuclear power plant is located near one of the most rapidly sent to Sheldon Wolfe, Chair, Atomic Safety and Licensing Board, Washington, D.C,20555 The chair will automatically send notification of the pre-hearing date to all those who write. At this time the NRC has not scheduled the pre-hearing for the proposed Wallis site, but this event will take place within the next few months. "The total biosphere-air, water, soil, food, health and economic aspects of our environment-will be affected by these decisions. I urge everyone to participate," Framson said. "I strongly feel that if enough people make their views known to the government, on all levels, the government will respond. In Latin, Vox I 'Tor 30 years the public has been told that nuclear power was clean, safe and inexpensive. In reality, it is just the opposite..." growing and densely populated Houston areas," Framson said. "This is a local issue of concern to everyone in the area because the plant is to be located in Wallis, Texas, 45 aerial miles from the downtown Houston Harris County Courthouse. "The NRC considers anyone within a 50-mile radius of a nuclear power plant as having 'good standing' for participation in the hearings. The NRC feels the population within this radius will be burdened by the greatest environmental impact," explains Framson. The longtime community-spirited leader emphasized that concerned individuals do not need to be an expert to participate in the hearings. "Everyone can be involved because everyone is affected, " Fransom stressed. "The only requirement for participation in the NRC hearings is to send a letter or post card to the Atomic Safety Licensing Board. The letter or card should express your desire to present an oral or written statement before the commission," Framson said. The letter can be are saying, sure we radiated you, but it wasn't that bad a dose. They won't be able to say that any longer." In addition, the nuclear power industry has been solely controlled by the government, Sheehan says. He believes that this will change and local citizens will become more involved in overseeing the controls and workings of nuclear plants. So, what will the verdict on the Silkwood case be? Diana Kohn says, "There will be a lot of surprised people in the courtroom, including the judge, if the Silk woods lose." Merle Silkwood agrees and adds that she hasn't even allowed herself to think of losing, but she also feels, "If we had held the trial anyplace but in Oklahoma City, our winning would have been certain. But, those jurors are going to have to live with Kerr-McGee's pressure all their lives—and that's a frightening thought." Sheehan says he is "virtually convinced" that if Kerr-McGee loses they will appeal the case and take it straight to the Supreme Court. The nuclear industry "can't afford not to," he says. The Silkwoods say they will continue with the suit for as long as they have the money. "I guess you might say it eases the pain of her death. We still miss her very much, her death like to killed our daughter Rosemary," Merle Silkwood says. "We also feel it's important to let people know how unsafe nuclear plants are. When we first started there was only Karen's case to prove it. Since then people have seen The China Syndrome and Populi means the voice of the people. I think it means the power of the people." Individuals who oppose nuclear power can support the Markey Weaver Amendment. This legislation proposes a halt for six months on grants for the construction of new nuclear power plants. Other legislation to prevent nuclear power plant development through a five-year moratorium is the Nuclear Reappraisement Act. Interested persons can write to the elected officials listed below: Senator John Tower The Senate Office Building Washington, D.C. 20510 U. S. Rep. Bob Eckhardt House Office Building Washington, D.C. 20515 Kathryn Stewart McDonald, staff reporter for The Beacon, became involved with the anti-nuclear movement after learning of government nuclear test sites in her former home, the Trust Territory of Micronesia. there was the Three-Mile Island incident, so I think they are more aware now." Whatever happens, it is almost certain that the nuclear power industry will never be the same again and it is just as certain that the name of Karen Silkwood will be remembered for a long time. "She is a martyr to the labor, feminist and anti-nuclear movements," says Niami Hanson. "There have been several people who have told us that her name will appear in the history books as someone who helped her country," says Merle Silkwood. "I believe she has done more good than anyone will ever know. She was fixing to come home you know, but she never did." Accolades aside, Karen Silkwood was a woman who saw what was wrong and set out to do something about it. Over the next few years, Texas will start building no less than five nuclear plants. Two of them will be very near Houston—the Allen Creek site in Wallis, 45 miles from downtown Houston and the South Texas Nuclear Facility in Bay City, said to be the largest in the world. And if we think that the Kerr-McGee- Karen Silkwood case is an isolated incident, rumors from Bay City, of beatings, intimidations of building inspectors, bribery, construction flaws and a citizens group to investigate these allegations, indicate that there may be many more chapters to the story started by Karen Silkwood. Barbara Karkabi is a staff reporter for the Houston Westside Reporter. creative Hairstylin by *j Melissa Noble 529-^779 869412© 133d Westheimer Jan Carson Houston's Choice for News. 5 and 6 p.m. Eyewitness News Houston Breakthrough 13 May 1979