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Houston Breakthrough, May 1979
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Houston Breakthrough, May 1979 - Page 8. May 1979. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 15, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/630/show/610.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(May 1979). Houston Breakthrough, May 1979 - Page 8. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/630/show/610

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough, May 1979 - Page 8, May 1979, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 15, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/630/show/610.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough, May 1979
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date May 1979
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
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Title Page 8
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File Name femin_201109_550ah.jpg
Transcript /7Z4 jS/ssoMiT Barthelme-Moore Associates Advertising and Marketing a full-service advertising agency since 1960 Helen Moore Barthelme Odell Pauline Moore 1110 Lovett Blvd., Suite 100 Houston, Texas 77006 713/521-9214 hous'ov-kol'man n. 1. A woman-owned business specializing in quality graphics and printing. 2. A large red brick house in the heart of Montrose. - adj. Having many and varied features. - v. Producing design, illustration, camera work, printing and, bindery. - adv. 1. To increase the client's business manifold. 2. To satisfy the client. House of Coleman 901 West Alabama -Houston 77006 • (713 > 523-2521 U. S. REP. MICKEY LELAND (left) chairs the first Town Hall Meeting of the Black/Hispanic Coalition. Other steering committee members (1 to r): ALFREDO DUNN, JOYCE MILLER, and U.S. REP. JOHN CONYERS. by Shirley Kowitz It was an historic meeting. Blacks and Hispanics met Saturday, May 5 on the Texas Southern University campus at a Town Hall Meeting to "bury the hatchet'' between the nation's two largest minority groups and to form a potentially powerful political force that will improve conditions for both groups. "We've been half-stepping. Blacks and Hispanics have been fighting each other for the crumbs and our people continue to starve," U.S. Representative Mickey Leland (D-Houston) told the audience. The newly-formed Black/Hispanic Democratic Coalition attracted over 300 community leaders to the all-day meeting. "We have done something that no one has ventured to do in the Democratic Party by uniting two strong forces. The first step," Leland explained, "is to work to resolve some of our problems, to discuss substantive issues that affect blacks, Hispanics and all poor people and to get grass roots support for the movement." The grass root support in Houston is here if the responses from the audience are indicative of the community at large. Christia Adair, an 85-year-old former executive secretary of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) during some of the toughest years in the city's racial history, received a standing ovation with her statement, "I have scars on my brain, my heart and my hands from working for our rights. If we get together we will no longer be a minority, we will be a majority." Another woman, Kathleen Rawls, said that coalition was not a new idea. "There were murmurings about coalition in the 60's. We must realize that brown is close to black and it makes little difference whether we are from the ghetto or the barrio." "We must recognize that Hispanics and blacks together can control this country," State Representative Ben Reyes of Houston said. "Hispanics and blacks are becoming sophisticated about how economics, government, and the system works," Alfredo Duran, chair of the Florida Democratic Party, said, "We will no longer challenge each other." "There's nothing like an idea whose time has come," quoted Representative Ron Dellums, one of the organizers of the coalition. Dellums, from California, gave an impassioned speech that received a standing ovation and many cries of "Right on" from the enthusiastic audience. Dellums emphasized that the town hall meetings are crucial to counteract a current right wing analysis of America's problems that is sweeping the country. "What I call a Proposition 13 (California tax relief plan) mentality is being heralded as the solution to America's problems," Dellums said. "It says the solution to problems lies in the government withdrawing from its obligations to help the millions of underprivileged and poor." Congressional representatives believe this is what the people want, Dellums said. Against that background, the town meeting will express "the flip side of Proposition 13," Dellums continued. "We need to get the attention of the media and say, hey, human misery still exists. We are in this together. Oppression and unemployment know no color. This is the time to transcend petty differences and self-interest and see the need of the whole." To bring home his point, Dellums then related an example of the importance of public opinion in this country. He told of a recent meeting he had attended between Soviet delegates and U.S. Representatives. According to Dellums, the Soviets sat on one side of the table stating strong opinions. On the opposite side, U.S. Representatives sat hedging their statements and saying, in effect, that they could not get too far ahead of public opinion because it was most important to them to get re-elected. "Re-election is more important to 99.9 percent of the congressmen than matters of principal or human life on this planet," Dellums said. The focal point of the coalition is the 1980 Democratic Primary, added Rep. Leland. "Jimmy Carter has failed to fulfill numerous promises and this time we will make certain that Carter meets our expectations." Although a carefully structured agenda had been prepared by members of the steering committee, Representative Leland, who serves as co-chair of the committee, abandoned the agenda before the morning session had ended. The many members of the audience who came forward to speak made it evident that this would be a town meeting in the best tradition of America. The people had come to be heard. They had come to tell their representatives of their concerns. Politicians are not leaders, he emphasized; they follow public opinion. That is why town meetings are needed to heighten the level of awareness in the Houston Breakthrough May 1979