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Houston Breakthrough, May 1979
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Houston Breakthrough, May 1979 - Page 7. May 1979. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 21, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/630/show/609.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(May 1979). Houston Breakthrough, May 1979 - Page 7. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/630/show/609

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough, May 1979 - Page 7, May 1979, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 21, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/630/show/609.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough, May 1979
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date May 1979
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 7
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_550ag.jpg
Transcript LLgLMailing Houston City Magazine the * M J ultimate in yellow journalism is \Jprobably a compliment," said Marvin Zindler (KTRK TV, May 1,) "I have other words for it." Apparently, what raised the self-styled consumer advocate's hackles was the March issue, with his picture on the cover (and a not very flattering story inside) and the January and February issues. He was somewhat mollified, however, by the fact that Gary Easterly, the publisher, had fired editor Tom Curtis. "... in defense of the magazine, it now has a new editor. . .and City has taken on a new look." Plus a new owner. The debt-plagued magazine has been bought by F.D.M. Publications, headed by Francois de Menil, the son of Dominique and the late John de Menil, Houston art patrons and members of the Schlumberger oil family. Houston City Magazine began as In Houston in 1977. After it ran into financial difficulties it was sold and came out in April 1978 with its present name. Editor David Crossley took over when the April issue of this year was in production. To Zindler's charges of "yellow journalism" Crossley said, "Well, he had some really harsh things to say about the magazine and about (former editor) Tom Curtis in particular. But he was standing there in front of that cover picture, so I presume it was sour grapes. "He was also very upset about the February cover (two attendants lounging in the back of their ambulance, smoking, while a child lies obviously injured outside). He said that was unrealistic and would never happen—you might find them ignoring a heart attack victim, but never a hurt kid." There is a certain perverse charm about Marvin Zindler accusing anyone else of yellow journalism. His film crew, as soon as they arrived at City's offices, started their cameras rolling on the Golden Girl Modeling studios next door, then panned across to City. "Yellow journalism" is to some extent subjective. What is lively and personal to one may be sensational to another. But City's May issue could be called "yellow" only in the sense of "chicken." After the Three Mile Island nuclear accident, editor Crossley contacted Andy Sansom, director of the Texas Energy Extension at the University of Houston, and Sansom quickly came up with a short piece on irregularities at the South Texas Nuclear Facility, a Houston Lighting and Power project near Bay City. It was rushed into the May issue. "We took other pages out to get it in," said Crossley. "At the owner's request" and over Crossley's protests, the story was yanked from the May issue and rescheduled for June. Apparently de Menil had no problem with running the story in June. (Last week, H.L.&P. cancelled their advertising contract with City, because of the magazines' "editorial policies.") H.L.&P. Advertising Manager Bill Secrest objected to the March issue with its "lesbians and houses of prostitution. I don't think that kind of journalism adds credibility to our advertising." He denied any knowledge of the upcoming nuclear story. In spite of de Menil's overruling him on the nuclear story, Crossley is enthusiastic about City's new owner. "He's a strong, creative personality, and he is willing to do whatever it takes to make Houston City Magazine the best in the country." Crossley's first project as editor was a "fashion feature" that he worked on with writer Joanne Harrison for the May issue. This feature was Crossley's first effort to "project an image of Gatsby-like elegance" for the magazine, as opposed to what he called its former "disturbed and polyester image." Harrison wrote a short feature (handsome man meets beautiful woman in ele vator—let's go to lunch, etc.) accompanied by a series of photographs. She looked around Houston for clothes and accessories, asked merchants for permission to use them, and in return, printed shopping information with the photographs. When I asked Crossley" whether this feature was not in fact an advertisement for all the products mentioned, he disagreed. He said the merchants supplying products had no control over where or how their merchandise would be used. However, when Harrison went to Nei- man-Marcus to borrow a particular suit that she wanted, the loan was made only on condition that every item on that page be from Neiman's. City complied. The July issue will feature a long excerpt from Stanley Marcus' new book, Quest for the Best, (that's the Marcus of Neiman-Marcus.) As of now, Neiman-Marcus does not buy advertising in Houston City Magazine. As of now, Nieman-Marcus doesn't need to. Lynda Bird Robb has been appointed to succeed Bella Abzug as chair of the president's National Advisory Commission on women. Robb said she will not hesitate to criticize Carter if she thinks it appropriate. She foresees no problems in following Abzug. "We represent different constituencies," she said. Robb was appointed to represent women. What does she think Abzug represented— chopped liver? i have looked at the magazine stands, I have seen the future and it is Texas," proclaimed NBC Today Show's critic, Gene Shalit (May 4). Calling Texas Monthly "the granddad- dy of Lone Star magazines" at six years old, Shalit praised the proliferation of Texas magazines, listing 13 of them in all. Shalit named D magazine "one of the slickest city magazines ... in the country' and called Texas Woman "more fashion than feminist." He bemoaned the fact that Texas Architecture is not Architexas, and all in all declared himself impressed by the healthy state of Texas, magazine- wise. The Texas Observer, consumer advocate and conscience of Texas journalism for well over twenty years, went unmen- tioned. So did a three-year-old publication that is more feminist than fashion. And . . . even in death, women can't escape those hackneyed physical attributions. Time magazine's obituary on Marvella Bayh described her as a "vivacious blond" .... Last March Carol Boudreaux resigned her job as press aide for the Houston Metropolitan Authority because her husband John Boudreaux was told he could not keep his job as city editor of the Houston Post if she kept hers. "Conflict of interest," said Post managing editor Kuyk Logan. His boss, Post owner Oveta Culp Hobby "concurred in the decision." Carol Boudreaux is now producing the evening news at KPRC-TV which is also owned by Hobby. "Several people have asked whether this was a sop from Mrs. Hobby," said Boudreaux, "but the initiative came from (KPRC-TV news director) Ray Miller." The Post's Logan sees no conflict of interest in this situation, since the Hobby-owned Post and the Hobby-owned tv station are "rival news organizations.". . . Two reporters at KPFT Houston's public radio station, have won first prize in the radio category of the 1978 Robert F. Kennedy Award for Outstanding Journalism. KPFT news director Steven McVicker and reporter Jeanne Jones were honored for their hour-long documentary, "The Question of Accountability: A Look at the Houston Police Department." The RFK Awards were established in 1968 as a memorial to the late senator by reporters who covered his final campaign .... Gabrielle Cosgriff is an editor of Houston Breakthrough. SPECIAL SCREENINGS DAILY If you're looking for a new way to advertise, or if you have a unique printing problem, try our silkscreening services. We can print anything from t-shirts to a table top, including: Exhibit & display work, 8' panels (on formica or glass), 20' banners, outdoor signs, t-shirts and garments, and brochure covers. Call us for an estimate on your special screening. A&E SCREEN PRINTING Mary Lou Crossley, Curlis Ann Reynolds 6245 Brookhill #2, Houston, Texas 77087/(713) 644-1731 WE CUT CORNERS And almost anything that requires'fine, professional engraving. We do elegant dimensional raised lettering, photo-etching, and sub-surface graphics, which can be applied to our line of nameplates and interior signs. We also carry a complete selection of awards, plaques and trophies. Our work is distinctive. Our prices sre discount. And that helps you cut a few corners, too. A (713) 526-2069 C 1810Ridgewood 'GRACE BREAUX • SCHAROLETTE NICKERSON Houston, Texas 77006 lie difference is in the detail* Re-doing a room means more than repainting the walls. It means checking for cracks and peeling J? paint. Taking the time to sand, to repair, to prime, and then to paint. Evenly. Carefully. Like new. Interior painting and wallpapering is our business. We give a lot of attention to detail because it makes a difference to us. And that's the difference. - Call for a free estimate. "BNT Residential & Commercial Wallpaper & Interior Paint Specialist (713)861-2211 Janie Ballard, Shirley Neely, Jean Tissue NEED A SIGN IN A HURRY? J Hour Budget Signs Low Cost, Quality Signs 1660 Westheimer • 526^0332 • Showcards • Truck, Car ck Boat Signs • Magnetic • Real Estate • Conventions Display Window Signs Bumper Stickers Civic Events Houston Breakthrough May 1*79