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Houston Breakthrough, February 1979
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Houston Breakthrough, February 1979 - Page 28. February 1979. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 13, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/6029/show/6024.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(February 1979). Houston Breakthrough, February 1979 - Page 28. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/6029/show/6024

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough, February 1979 - Page 28, February 1979, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 13, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/6029/show/6024.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough, February 1979
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date February 1979
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 28
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_547ba.jpg
Transcript Tribute to Joan From Her Friends "Joan once took a job as a census-taker— she was the most dedicated census-taker the government has ever known. To give you an example, one day she went to a certain address only to find an empty lot. The neighbors told her the house had just been loaded on a flat-bed truck and moved away. Joan took off in hot pursuit, caught up with the house, stopped it and interviewed the startled occupants. Now that's dedicated!" Joan Hanlon died on January 21, and Tom, her husband, related that story to about 50 of Joan's friends who had gat- ered at Breakthrough to share with each other their thoughts and memories of Joan. One of Breakthrough's earliest and strongest supporters, Joan worked with us on our first issue three years ago, and was at the printer's with us at 5:30 that morning to see the first papers come off the press. She touched the lives of so many people and cared deeply about their problems. "Joan was like the hub of a wheel," said Jo Nelson, who had gone to school at UH with her. Joan went back to complete her bachelor's degree at age 40, then went on to graduate first in her class from the UH School of Social Work. In 1975 Joan ran for school board trustee in the conservative Spring Branch School District-a district she knew well, having put her five children through its schools. Her brother Ralph Waite, John Walton in the television series The Waltons came to town to help her with her campaign. Elaine Oliver remembered working night and day with Joan in her campaign. One night they were rummaging through the trash-bin behind a furniture store for materials to make signs when Joan climbed on top of the dumpster, at 2 a.m., and shouted, "Look at me, this is how bad I want to be on that school board!" Peggy Hall said that Joan had struck her personal blow for freedom when she refused to sort the family's socks anymore. "She didn't wear them, so why should she have to sort them?" One day, Peggy went over to the Hanlon's and witnessed the concrete evidence of Joan's liberation-four enormous plastic garbage cans full of unsorted socks. There were many such stories that afternoon. They made us laugh, as Joan had made us laugh. Sarah Cooper played the piano and we sang the women's songs that Joan had loved. Jeanne Artlip sang a capella, her face radiant with love and joy. As Mickey Leland said, 4T feel grateful to have had such a person as my friend." Hattie Thurlow showed us photos of Joan -bringing us all together in sharing aspects of her life we had not known. And in that sharing, we came to know each other better, and Joan would have liked that. Joan took great pride in her leap from graduate student to director of a social service agency when she became executive director of the Voluntary Action Center of Houston. She poured her limitless energy and talent into making VAC a force in the community. Joan believed strongly that with the help of volunteers, every community problem could be relieved. If she looked hard enough, resources would be found. The lonely, the alcoholic, the aging, all were her special problem for which she sought an answer. She served as a role model to show women how volunteerism could be developed into a career. She found jobs for countless women trying to re-enter the work force. "These were the happiest two years of Joan's life," said Tom. "She had finally come into her own. Her family was her rock, where she got support and love. Her job filled her ego needs, and the people in this room made her heart beat and made her laugh." At UH, March 10 Holly Near in Concert By Pokey Anderson She entered her first talent contest at the age of seven. She took nine years of voice lessons from Johnny Mathis' former teacher, sang in summer stock and in clubs, appeared in four movies, half a dozen television shows, and in the Broadway production of Hair. All before she was 21 . . . yes, Holly Near was on the way to becoming a Star. But wait. The more "successful" she was, the less she enjoyed it. A turning point in her life came when she joined the 1971 Free the Army show and toured the Pacific with Jane Fonda & Company. "A lot of women came to political struggle through personally recognizing their oppression as women, whereas my politics started to be developed in a global way and with that came the struggle of women." Now, Near defines herself as a "cultural worker," having seen enough of the mainstream plastic Star factories. "I would like to see the breakdown of the Star system in our society. It creates someone better than someone else; the person is perceived as a valuable item in a glass cage. It makes them inaccessible and makes the listener feel intimidated, depressed, and less than the performer," Near says. Probably because of her non- star focus, Near easily establishes rapport with her audiences, from a small women's center to a rally of 50,000. In many ways, Holly Near defies categorization. Her cultural work embraces issues such as anti-nuclear work, lesbian/ gay rights, Native American support and prisoner rights. The subjects of her songs include an older woman who raised 13 sons, Karen Silkwood who died mysteriously while investigating nuclear hazards, and women who were pirates off the eastern coast in the 18th century. Her style ranges from anthems and ballads to honky-tonk, folk and blues. It is perhaps her attitude that is the most definitive. Near explains, "I like doing music that speaks to our very special lives as we struggle on this earth. I don't get very excited by songs that are repeats of last year's love songs on AM radio. I like being part of building an alternative network." Near and pianist/composer J. T. Thomas are doing a 50-city tour this winter and spring to publicize Near's new album, Imagine My Surprise, on Redwood Records, and as Near puts it, "to share music with the people who inspire the songs." The three-city Texas leg of the tour will be Near's first return to Texas since the IWY Conference. Near is happy to be working with Thomas on the tour, and says of her, "No matter where the moment takes me in the song, J. T. is always right there by my side, moving with the mood." Thomas is well known in the theater world for her musicals written for young people to perform. She has won an ASCAP award for her writing. Holly Near & J. T. Thomas will be performing in Austin on March 7, in Dallas (at the American Association of Women in Psychology conference) on March 9, and will conclude their tour in Houston on Saturday, March 10. The Houston concert will be at the University of Houston, Agnes Arnold Hall, at 8 p.m. Tickets are available in advance at the Bookstore, B.D. & Daughter, Wilde 'N' Stein, "Just" Marion & Lynn's, Ms. Take II, and in Galveston at My Sisters. Child care and sign language will be available, and the site is wheelchair accessible. For further information, call 665-3083 or 526-7828. The concert is presented by Out & Out Productions, who brought Meg Christian & Teresa Trull to town last spring, and who presented Sue Fink & Joelyn Grippo in February. ■¥" HOLLY NEAR singer/ songwriter J.T THOMAS pianist Houston Breakthrough 28 February, 1979