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Houston Breakthrough, February 1979
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Houston Breakthrough, February 1979 - Page 27. February 1979. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 11, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/6029/show/6023.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(February 1979). Houston Breakthrough, February 1979 - Page 27. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/6029/show/6023

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough, February 1979 - Page 27, February 1979, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 11, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/6029/show/6023.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough, February 1979
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date February 1979
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 27
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_547az.jpg
Transcript ® Courses a la Carte University of St. Thomas ...presents over 150 ways to spend some time creatwely Here are just a few courses offerings Adventure: wilderness. Rio Grande canyons, canoeing -Arts & Crafts: auto repair, pottery, calligraphy, graphics, photography —Dance: ballet, modern, disco, guitar, yoga —Food & Drink: fine wines, cooking, nutrition, herbs- Languages: english, french. german, italian, Spanish —Reaching Out: being single, beauty, bridge, health, writing, judo, stress relief, computers— Real Estate: fundamentals, geography, appraisal — Sports & Recreation: gymnastics, jogging, juggling, racquetball, tennis ...registration, Feb. 5-16 and classes begin Feb. 26. ...call us at 522-7914 for a free brochure The University of St Thomas provides equal educational opportunities without regard to race. color, sex. handicap, age and national or ethnic origin ^on% MOLAS Handstitched on the San Bias Islands $18 to $40. Handwoven Shawls, $10 to $30. 1710 SUNSET BLVD. 527-9838 HOUSTON, TEXAS 77005 The Village Cheese Shop DOMESTIC AND IMPORTED CHEESES GOURMET FOODS FINE WINES COOKWARE MARY ELLEN ALLEN (713) 527-0398 MON-SAT. 9-6 2484 BOLSOVER HOUSTON, TEXAS 77005 call between the hours of 7 a.m. and 10 p.m. PHYLLIS R. FRYE j< civil and bioengineering /Aindustrial hygiene: design, schedule, estimate, specify and draft jf ?^^^^ THE FILTRISH COMPANY P.O. Box 35904 5705 Firenza Houston, Texas 77035 (713)723-8368 Introducing KAY LITTLE New Car Sales SAM WHITE OLDSMOBILE O Ah A \ A /LI ITC" 8301 Beechnut at Southwest Freeway OAIVI VVnl It Houston, Texas 77036 OLDSTOWN (713)-776-7800 USA KIEKE& WOODS BUSINESS SERVICES Complete Business Services Specializing in Bookkeeping Susan Kieke Paulette Woods 10200 East Freeway Suite 202 Houston, Texas 77029 674-3582 impute a lack of femininity, a hatred of men; they attribute her talent to a powerfully masculine mind. She wrote in every medium of her time: theater, innumerable letters, essays regarding physical phenomena, and poetry. Her inquisitive and rational mind was locked in a world that was fossilized and fanatic. The Spain of the 17th century was in decay: the great empire of Carlos V, on which the sun never set, was sinking toward its night. In Spanish America, that night was prolonged until the colonies broke with the mother country. After having published the greater part of her work (with the aid of women in the Viceroy's court who took her work to Spain) and enjoying the recognition of her contemporaries, Sor Juana received a letter from a bishop who, concealing his identity under the woman's name of Sor Filotea de Jesus, reprimanded her, urging her to give up her concern for worldy matters and dedicate herself to piety and meditation. The Catholic Church had become alarmed at the fame of the nun of the Convent of San Jeronimo who dared to defy illustrious religious leaders and to be enthusiastic about new ideas. Sor Juana knew who wrote the letter, and she answered it. Her letter, the Reply to Sor Filotea de Jesus, now occupies an illustrious place in the defense of women. After feigning astonishment that such a ''venerable lady" as Sor Filotea could be concerned about "a poor nun, the least creature in the world," Sor Juana went on to describe her life and explain her powerful bent toward learning. ''Since the first light of reason the inclination to letters was so strong and powerful that neither the reproach of others (of which I have had many) nor my own reflections (of which I have had not a few) have sufficed to keep me from following this natural impulse which God placed in me; He knows why and to what purpose, and He knows that I have prayed to Him to put out the light of my understanding, leaving only enough to keep His law, since the rest is more than enough, some are convinced, in a woman; and still there is one who says it is harmful." This was the same pen which had previously written in one of her poems: Hombres necios, que acusais a la mujer, sin razon; sin ver que so is la ocas ion de lo mismo que culpais. ("You foolish men, who judge woman wronly, without knowing that you are the cause of the very thing you condemn.") In spite of her literary triumphs- indeed, because of them— her life was not an easy one. On more than one occasion she was denied her poetry and reading because of the envy or fear of someone of the superiors of the convent. Gradually, she devoted herself less to reading and writing, and dedicated herself to the observation of the world around her. She would become lost in thought studying the play of light on different surfaces and over moving objects. She calculated angles and spaces, and sought a rational explanation for unexplained phenomena. But it was a bad time for such endeavor. As Mexican poet and essayist Octavio Paz has said of the intellectuals of the period, "Intelligence gave them no pleasure; it was a dangerous weapon; it served to overthrow one's enemies, but also it could cost one his soul. The solitary figure of Sor Juana stands out even more in that world made up of black or whte, of revealed truth or heresy, which did not know the value of doubt and investigation." In his book, The Labyrinth of Solitude, Paz laments "the fate of a woman who was so far above her society and her culture." "Sor Filotea" did not reply to Sor Juana's letter, but the poet nun would pay with her life for daring to show that she was a woman of talent. Harassed by loneliness, her soul torn between a Catholicism that demanded unquestioning faith and a mind avid to inquire and know, finally forsaken in a society that could not believe God had no fear of research or social change, Sor Juana renounced poetry and scholarship. Under the pressure of the bishop she even sold her library, ceding the money to the order, and thought only of death. Soon after, the plague ravaged the convent and Sor Juana devoted herself with suicidal dedication to caring for the sick nuns. Within a few months of her renunciation she was dead. Now, in an epoch focused on women's achievements, her remains have been discovered. A long time has passed since the repression of her inquiring spirit and much has changed. Three hundred years ago, Sor Juana had to take refuge in a convent to try to fulfill herself, and used her powerful voice to appeal to the men of her time about the plight of women. Today women seek their proper place on a level with men to begin a dialogue that can only produce greater understanding and a possibility for betterment in a world that has functioned until now with only half of its intellectual capacity. Sor Juana failed at her task in her time, but now, three hundred years later, she may be reborn to accept the plaudits of her sisters of the world. February, 1979 27 Houston Breakthrough