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Houston Breakthrough, February 1979
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Houston Breakthrough, February 1979 - Page 26. February 1979. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 14, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/6029/show/6022.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(February 1979). Houston Breakthrough, February 1979 - Page 26. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/6029/show/6022

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough, February 1979 - Page 26, February 1979, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 14, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/6029/show/6022.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Houston Breakthrough, February 1979
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date February 1979
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 26
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_547ay.jpg
Transcript PAPERBACK SWAP N' SHOP | Tired of paying high prices for new books? Try our swap plan for used paperbacks! :■:;■>:■:.;;: Marie B. Stimson Owner 1109 Pine Drive • Dickinson, TX 77539 • 534-3370 Open 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. r Jenny Crumbaugh Manager John Crumbaugh Manager 158 East Main * Clute, TX 77531 * 265-7992 Open 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. • Closed Tuesday Lillian Graves Manager 3215 Center Street • Deer Park, TX 77356 • 4764070 Open 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. ■ Closed Tuesday Robert Lake Independent Roofer Over 30 years experience New Roofs Installed Leaky Roofs Repaired Call 527-9614 or leave message at 644-4759 Will hire and train roofers "Whenever we're out of the office, the Breakthrough phones are answered courteously and your messages are taken efficiently 24 hours a day by OmAuj&v Imc OF HOUSTON a woman owned business • CALL FORWARDING • RADIO PAGING • LIVE ANSWERING SERVICE . —,, w.».w. central office 4215 Graustark northeast office 4215 Graustark southwest office 3221 Fondren northwest office 12345 Kingsrkte "X 524-3985 691-2088 781-3413 467-2111 ROBERTA K. TILLINGHAST, PRESIDENT Houston. Galveston • San Antonio .Corpus Christi SOR jUANA Living as a nun was the only way she could dedicate herself to scholarship. By Mercedes Valdivieso Translation by Ellen Wilkerson In recent weeks the world press carried the news of the discovery in Mexico of the tomb of Sister Juana Ines de la Cruz, (1648-1 695) a nun of the convent of San Jeronimo in Mexico City. Sor Juana was called "Mexico's most illustrious writer of the 17th century" and one account noted her poetry is still required reading in much of Latin America today. But in the closed society of her time, though her ability was recognized-contemporaries referred to her as the Tenth Muse she was under constant pressure from her church to renounce her writings and lead a life of piety and meditation. She remained dedicated to scholarship and art until her increasing loneliness and the power of a church that demanded unquestioning faith and obedience finally drove her to stop fighting. She died within months of her renunciation. She was born Juana de Asbaje of Spanish parents so that her social position was among the high born Creoles. For a young girl of the upper class there existed two possibilities: to marry or to enter the convent. Sor Juana chose the convent. She was never really suited for the convent of the 17th century, a repressive time when the church was overwhelmed by the search for morality and salvation. She had been a precocious child who learned to read when she was only three years old and wrote poetry before she was seven. At 12, she entered the court of the Viceroy of Mexico, where she learned Latin, read the scholarly works of her time, wrote poetry and began making what the Viceroy and his wife believed were brilliant observations. Legend has it that the Viceroy, wishing to test her erudition, convened a group of learned men to question his protege. She is said to have left them amazed by her knowledge. Legend also has it that Sor Juana was more than once disappointed in love, although no names or facts have ever been found to support the story. Some claimed these ''disappointments" influenced her decision to enter the convent. She once told the bishop who was to reprimand her for her literary vocation, "I entered religious life because although I knew the state had many things repugnant to my intelligence. . .withal, because of the total revulsion that I felt toward marriage, it was the least disproportionate and the most decent thing that I could choose, considering the certainty that I wished to feel regarding my salvation." The life of a nun was also the only one that would permit her, within limitations, to dedicate herself to learning and the arts. She respected motherhood (she dedicated poems to the children of friends and patrons), she understood love, and she wrote poetry that was erotic, mystic and laudatory. She was fully aware of what she could surrender to life. She knew which role was best suited to her. So she chose the convent, meditation and books-her library grew to 4,000 volumes-and choosing it, she must have felt the enormous solitude that her choice would bring her. Thus, she conscientiously sought a destiny that did not include marriage or motherhood. The phenomenon of Sor Juana, still mysterious and little understood, has been analyzed from many angles. Some have pointed to the eroticism they discover in the symbolism of her poems, while others test Freud's theories in her work. Others have made insinuations that Houston Breakthrough 26 February, 1979