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Houston Breakthrough, February 1979
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Houston Breakthrough, February 1979 - Page 21. February 1979. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 12, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/6029/show/6017.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(February 1979). Houston Breakthrough, February 1979 - Page 21. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/6029/show/6017

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough, February 1979 - Page 21, February 1979, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 12, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/6029/show/6017.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough, February 1979
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date February 1979
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 21
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File Name femin_201109_547at.jpg
Transcript women's best country*" long history of involvement in women's sports. WPBL franchises were offered in cities and states where it was felt women's basketball had a chance to establish itself as a legitimate sports attraction rather than a novelty. The Angel franchise was purchased for about $50,000 by a general partnership of Houston businessmen led by Hugh Sweeney. Sweeney is assisted by his friend and business associate, Dick McDowell, a staff member with the Houston Astros for a number of years. Now running his own business, McDowell volunteered to help with ticket distribution for the Angels and now finds himself increasingly involved with the team. He is obviously proud of the Angels and boasts that the whole WPBL is a soundly conceived, well- run organization with an excellent chance to succeed. According to McDowell, the league is financially stable, the prime requisite for any professional sport. Iowa, Chicago, Milwaukee and Minnesota make up the Mid-west Division of the league, while Houston, New York, New Jersey and Dayton comprise the Eastern Division. The Angels are the only southern team in the league and there are no plans to change that situation in the near future although the league does plan to expand next year, adding a four-team West Coast Division. As is the case with all professional leagues, New York City's is considered the "key"team. That is, it is hoped that a team based in New York City will generate enough interest and attention to give the league marketability across the rest of the country. In the WPBL, however, it may be that Houston will become the "key" city as media response to the Angels has far exceeded the expectations of any women's sports follower in Houston. Game results are regularly reported on radio and television sports programs, occasional film highlights are featured on the ten o'clock TV news, and the city's two major newspapers carry Angels results right along with other local basketball coverage. Much of the credit for this belongs to the team and to Knodel and Williams. But someone had to get the sportswriters ana cameras out to the games in the first place and much of the credit for that must go to McDowell who acts as a press secretary and whose enthusiasm about the Angels is infectious. The WPBL got off the ground in New York last September with a college and free agent draft. At the time of the draft only three women were nationally known in basketball. Free agent and former Women's SuperStars competitor Karen Logan had received national exposure by way of the CBS program, Challenge of the Sexes when she soundly defeated her NBA op ponent in the playground game known as "horse." Also well known through coverage of their collegiate and Olympic careers were UCLA's Ann Meyers and Delta State's Lucy Harris. Meyers is considered by some experts to be the finest guard in the country. Harris led Delta State to a national collegiate title in her senior year and was the leading scorer for the U. S. silver medalist 1976 Olympic team. With his franchise barely three days old, Sweeney attended the draft and came home with the rights to both Meyers and Harris, only to have Meyers decide to retain her amateur status in hopes of playing on the 1980 Olympic team. Harris was another story. As McDowell says, "Coach Knodel was the first coach ever to lose his star center to pregnancy." Houston's failure to sign either of its top draft picks for this season may have been a blessing in disguise. The Angels currently lead the league and of their four solid starters, only center Belinda Candler was a draft pick. High-scoring forward Chapman was chosen at a free-agent try- out camp, as was guard Aulenbacher. Mayo, the power forward, is a former track star who came to the Angels just before the season started when ex-Houston Oiler Ernie Ladd called Sweeney and requested that Mayo be given a chance to try out for the team. Mayo, a graduate of Grambling was "just sitting at home wanting to play basketball." She talked with her high school coach, who knew Ladd, and the necessary arrangements were made. Although Mayo had never played organized basketball before her junior year at Grambling, she did get a lot of sand-lot experience playing in the back yard with her 10 brothers and sisters in Lake Charles, Louisiana. Much has been written about the glamour of being a professional athlete but little is said about the bleaker aspects of this life. The Angels are almost unanimous in thier dislike of the amount of travel involved in their schedule. League rules require an out-of-town team to arrive for an away game at least 24 hours prior to the start of the game. As Mayo says, "That leaves a lot of time for just walking around." Neither do the Angels have any "fat- cat" contracts to make life a little easier. The average salary in the league is between $3,000 and $4,000 for a six-month season—although some Angels earn a good deal more than that-and most of the Angels have signed three-year contracts. They practice daily, with the exception of game days and, because basketball takes up so much of their time, the majority of the team members have had to seek employment outside their professions. "Rush, rush, rush. I'm always rushing. Rush to my 30-minute lunch hour. Rush home after work. Then I have ten min- Angels' guard Karen Aulenbacher successfully blocks Iowa's attempt at a basket. utes to eat before leaving for practice," says Bubrig. Also, the women complain that their family and social lives are sharply curtailed. Although many parents and friends drive hundreds of miles for games, most of the games are far from home and the players miss their families and fans. A group of local men are the team's official cheerleaders, called the Guardian Angels. Led by Ron Coleman, an All- American Cheerleader at the University of Houston, the Guardian Angels were introduced to inspire publicity like that received by cheerleaders for the National Football League this season. The Angels are almost certain to make the WPBL playoffs in April and by that time everyone in Houston will be jumping on the bandwagon. Until then they have two home games in February—including a very important one against Dayton February 14 in the Summit—five home games in March, and one in April. That leaves a lot of time to get out and get to know the Angels and the great game of basketball that they play. You won't be sorry. The Houston Angels No. Player Position Height 33 Patty Bubrig G 5-8 24 Belinda Candler C 5-11 22 Vicky Chapman F 5-11 45 Pat Johnson F 5-11 23 Belinda Jones G 5-7 11 Karen Aulenbacher G 5-8 25 Gail Dobson F 5-9 20 Glenda Holleyman G 5-10 40 Jessie Kenlaw F 5-10 14 Dollie Mosley F 5-9 15 Cynthia Washington G 5-7 10 Paula Mayo C 5-11 Remaining Home Games Wed. February 14 Dayton Rockettes Sun. March 11 Chicago Hustle Tues.. March 13 Iowa Cornets Thur. March 15 New Jersey Gems Sun. March 18 New York Stars " Sun. March 25 Dayton Rockettes Tues. March 27 New Jersey Gems Tues. April 3 Minnesota Fillies For ticket information, call 781-5085. February, 1979 21 Houston Breakthrough