Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Houston Breakthrough, February 1979
Page 20
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Houston Breakthrough, February 1979 - Page 20. February 1979. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 12, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/6029/show/6016.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(February 1979). Houston Breakthrough, February 1979 - Page 20. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/6029/show/6016

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough, February 1979 - Page 20, February 1979, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 12, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/6029/show/6016.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Houston Breakthrough, February 1979
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date February 1979
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 20
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_547as.jpg
Transcript ttrThey keep winning* They are the professional basketball team in the Chapman (left) throws a mid-court pass to teammate Belinda Jones (number 23). says, "They don't have the big egos to feed like most men's teams. . . . They cheer for each other, not like members of a men's team do, but in a real sense. They really want each other to do well." And they do well. In their first year of play, they are winning; they are leading the Women's Professional Basketball League (WPBL) with a 12-1 record, far a- head of any other team (in fact, Iowa, at 8-5, is second). They are also attracting an increasingly large number of fans with each home game they play. Many fans are first drawn to the game by curiosity only to discover that the fast-paced game the women play is just as exciting as the men's game. Watching the Angels, one is reminded of the famous run-and-gun Boston Celtic teams of the 1960's. The Angels are very quick and a fine shooting and rebounding team with good ball handling skills. Unlike most of the teams in the league, they don't seem to have a really outstanding "star" player. Center Belinda Candler leads the team in scoring, but when she was hurt in the Angels* first home game, Jessie Kenlaw and Cynthia Washington shared her center position so well that the Angels kept right on winning. Chapman has been improving rapidly, witness her 33 points against Iowa, while her running mate at the other forward position, Paula Mayo, was busily shooting 24 points in the same game. When Mayo and Chapman tire, Pat Johnson, Gail Dobson and Dollie Mosley come in and take up the slack. Patty Bubrig and Belinda Jones currently alternate playing one of the guard positions. Jones is quick and a good ball handler but seems to be having trouble finding her shooting eye. Bubrig had a lot of turnovers early in the season but appears to be settling down and has been getting a lot more playing time lately. When the going gets rough, Glenda Hol- leyman steps in at guard. Holleyman has the reputation of being a "cool head" who doesn't make mistakes and Coach Knodel uses her to slow down the opposition when they get a hot streak going. The other guard position has been nailed down by the Angels' "home-town girl makes good" player, Karen Aulen- bacher, from Baylor via Conroe. Aulen- bacher is the team leader on the court and until Mayo and Chapman got hot she was the team's leading scorer during Candler's absence. Her role is unusual in that she is the play-making as well as the shooting guard. Usually a guard is either one or the other. At Baylor, where she was coached by Glenda Holleyman, Aulenbacher was a forward, which may account for her versatility. Aulenbacher, now a physical education teacher at Conroe, did a great deal of agonizing before signing her professional contract in December. Like almost all amateur athletes, her dream was to play on an Olympic team. A realistic look at her competition and a heart-to-heart talk with Olympic team coach and good friend, Sue Gunter, convinced her that her chances of making the Olympic team were slim. Now, under Knodel, she has turned into an outstanding player. She's still a little disappointed about the Olympics, but excited about the Angels. So are her seventh and eighth grade students who have formed themselves into an organization known as "Aulenbacher's Angels," a very vocal group at the Houston home games. For Chapman, from tiny McNeese State University in Louisiana, there was no dream of the Olympics. She didn't believe she was good enough. Like Mayo, Chapman took up basketball late, not playing until she started college. Softball was her favorite sport but there are no professional women's softball teams in the area. When the Angels announced their tryout camp, Chapman hopped the first bus to Houston and a shot at the pros, and made the team. "I was kinda scared to leave my job," says Chapman, who was a graduate assistant at her alma mater. But, she says, "I've alway dreamed of playing basketball and this is my chance. I want to give it my best shot." The Angels are pioneers in an exciting new sports venture for women and happy to be there. Coach Knodel and his assistant Greg Williams are the first male coaches many of the players have had and the team is overwhelming in their positive response to the coaches. They feel that for the first time in their lives they are receiving serious, dedicated coaching and the proof of this coaching appears on the court. Knodel, who normally works for ex- Rice basketball player Tommy Hudgens at Builders Supply Concrete, is very high on the abilities of his team. "I'm having more fun coaching these girls than I've ever had," Knodel says. "They listen to instructions and they give 100 percent effort." But he's not satisfied yet, and he feels he has a lot of coaching to do. Chronicle writer Burt Darden said recently that Knodel has had to devote time to basics that he would rather have spent on fine points. "I'm not criticizing the level of coaching these girls got in college," Knodel says. "They just didn't get as good coaching as most boys do." Knodel has also said, "I guess I expect them to play smoother than they do, but they just can't because they're weak fundamentally. I get overexcited watching them. Sometimes the ball might bounce off three different people before it gets to the right place. But I've adjusted to it by telling myself they just can't be as smooth as men because they don't have the fundamental background." They're also a little smaller that most WPBL teams, whose players' height usually averages about six feet. The Angels are three inches shorter than that. But they keep winning. They are the best women's professional basketball team in the country. Many who thought the WPBL was a joke are now looking at the Houston Angels and thinking otherwise. The WPBL is the brain-child of Bill Byrne, league president and a man with a Houston Breakthrough 20 February, 1979