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Houston Breakthrough, February 1979
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Houston Breakthrough, February 1979 - Page 14. February 1979. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 10, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/6029/show/6011.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(February 1979). Houston Breakthrough, February 1979 - Page 14. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/6029/show/6011

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough, February 1979 - Page 14, February 1979, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 10, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/6029/show/6011.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough, February 1979
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date February 1979
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 14
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_547an.jpg
Transcript The Declaration of Independence (July 4, 1776) as modified by Dr. Nanette Bruckner, Associate Professor, Women's Studies, University of Houston, Clear Lake City: "We hold these truths to be self- evident, that all [people] are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty, and the pursuit of Happiness. That to secure these rights, Governments are instituted among [people] deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed. That whenever any Form of Government becomes destructive of these ends, it is the Right of the People to alter or to abolish it, and to institute new Government, laying its foundation on such principles and organizing its powers in such form, as to them shall seem most likely to effect their Safety and Happiness. Prudence, indeed, will dictate that Governments long established should not be changed for light and transient causes; and accordingly all experience hath shown, that [peoplekind] are more disposed to suffer, while evils are sufferable, than to right themselves by abolishing the forms to which they are accustomed. But when a long train of abuses and usurpations, pursuing invariably the same Object evinces a design to reduce them under absolute Despotism, it is their right, it is their duty, to throw off such Government, and to provide new Guards for their future security . . . "The history of the present [President of the United States] is a history of repeated injuries and usurpations, all having in direct object the establishment of an absolute Tyrrany over [Womyn]. To prove this, let Facts be submitted to a candid world: M; . . He has disolved Representative[s] . . . repeatedly, for opposing with [wo] manly firmness, his invasions on the rights of people. ". . . He has made [Womyn] dependent on his Will alone, for the tenure of their offices. ". . . We, therefore, the Representatives of the Womyn of the United States of America . . . solemnly publish and declare, That Womyn are, and of Right, ought to be Free and Independent . . . that they are Absolved from all Allegiance to the [President], and that all political connection between them and the [President], is and ought to be totally dissolved. **. . . And for the support of the Declaration, with a firm reliance on [Womyn Power], we mutually pledge to each other our Lives, our Fortunes, and our sacred Honor." Patricia J. Dozier, President, University Feminists, University of Houston: "The recent firing of Bella Abzug appears, in my view, to be the fate of women connected with the current administration who won't 'play the game.' Like Midge Costanza, Abzug took her job seriously and refused to be mere window dressing while there was real work to be done. Instead, she confronted the administration on issues, refusing to allow the committee to become the placebo it was apparently intended to be. "Personally, Bella Abzug makes people uncomfortable. She's not what a woman 'should' be; she's not young, or pretty, or even nice. She is outspoken, abrasive, flamboyant. However, she did not develop this style since her appointment to the committee last year, and I am surprised at the antagonism on the part of the administration occasioned by her acting in a way that is consistent with her political history and commitment to feminism. "The administration's treatment of Abzug and Costanza reinforces my doubts as to how seriously it takes women and their problems. If the administration wants to close the credibility gap that has developed between what it says and what it does in regard to women, strong action is called for. The opportunity is available; the ERA ratification struggle is still ahead. It will take demonstrable action, and not rhetoric, to regain the confidence and support of women." Cilia Teresa, Board member of Houston Council on Human Relations, Mexican American Foundation and the Ms. Foundation for Women: "Two things stand out in my mind about Ms. Abzug's dismissal. I believe she was being chastised for her style and for daring to give President Carter counsel, which did not give consent, but indeed criticized his economic policies. "Ms. Abzug's manner was described as 'abrasive,' and, therefore, not lady-like by her male and female critics alike. It saddens one to think that we women cannot be accepted for our personality traits. We must fit into a mold. "Ms. Abzug should be honored for the wonderful, productive work she did for the citizens of this country while serving in Congress and on the National Women's Commission. "I strongly believe women can and should advise Mr. Carter on the Salt Agreement, the space program, international policies, the FBI, the CIA. . . as well as energy and any and all issues that are of concern to us as citizens." Pat Cearcy, President, Houston Chanter Coalition of Labor Union Women (CLUW) and member National Executive Board and acting State Vice President of CLUW: "The firing of Bella Abzug by President Carter is a slap in the face to all women an attempt to put women back into their place. "National CLUW honored Bella Abzug at our annual convention last fall in Washington, D.C. for her 'outstanding contribution for the women's movement.' The manner of her firing is a hurting thing-done without any consideration to the other members of the National Advisory Committee. "I support the women who resigned, including our national President, Joyce ■ Miller. "Bella was fighting for the livelihood of all women: trying to relate to President Carter what effect his economic policy had on poor, disadvantaged women. Her firing has put all women in a minority status, regardless of what status or position they hold." Marjorie Randal, Co-chair, Texas NOW Education Task Force: 'The unceremonious firing of Bella Abzug seems motivated by someone's personal dislike, especially when the method is considered. She has not been accused of corruption or inefficiency in office, only of 'abrasiveness, tactlessness,' etc. " Only a few press reports and editorial columns have mentioned her actions as chair of the National Commission. I have seen no recent mention of her efficient service in behalf of the taxpayers on the Armed Forces Committee in Congress where she questioned many military expenditures. There is reason to think that her unpopularity in Washington originated then, in her opposition to inflated defense budgets. It is curious now to see the trivialization of her public career in general, and particularly the silence on this part of it. "Bella Abzug has presumed that women should share in the decisions of government. She has sent few signals of feminine deference. That Abzug acquired a loyal constituency in New York suggests that she could be charming, tactful and whatever else was necessary when campaigning. "But she ' expected to function in office, and she did. The campaign has grown steadily to form attitudes of sniggering disrespect toward her. Editorial writers are now parroting emotional phrases about this woman whom they have hardly studied. The phrases originated with men who don't know much about her except that they don't like her. "The old boys' club has never felt called upon to get the facts before taking a stand, and they jump to stand against an uppity woman any time. I think this predictable reaction has been manipulated by men who do not want their expenditures questioned by a woman who is perceived as a dangerous critic. Houston Breakthrough 14 February, 1979