Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Houston Breakthrough, February 1979
Page 6
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Houston Breakthrough, February 1979 - Page 6. February 1979. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 10, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/6029/show/6003.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(February 1979). Houston Breakthrough, February 1979 - Page 6. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/6029/show/6003

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough, February 1979 - Page 6, February 1979, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 10, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/6029/show/6003.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Houston Breakthrough, February 1979
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date February 1979
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 6
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_547af.jpg
Transcript MediaMatters by gabrielle cosgriff They had just cut into the chocolate birthday cake, the one shaped like a TV set with "Happy 45th, Jerry," written on the screen, when Jody Powell burst into Jerry Rafshoon 's office. Powell was clutching a four-page news release, and he was angry. He pulled Hamilton Jordan aside. "Jesus Christ! Did you see this thing?," he asked. And he showed it to Jordan and then they were angry together. Rafshoon joined them and he read the document and then he was angry, too. Bella Abzug has got to go, they decided in just a matter of minutes, as the party bubbled on around them. They reread the news release and got angry all over again. It was Thursday evening. -Martin Schram Washington Post January 17, 19 78 By Friday evening, the party was over —not only was Abzug gone, so were the majority of the National Advisory Committee for Women. Out of 40 members, 25 resigned in protest at their co-chair's firing. A "fun story" is what Rafshoon promised reporters that Friday afternoon, and Jordan was seen to chuckle in anticipation. "A visitor. . . could not help but notice the lip-smacking glee with which presidential aides were savoring her impending execution," commented David Broder, syndicated columnist. "In terms of sheer flackery, it was the hardest White House sell since the recognition of China." FOR RELEASE, FRIDA Y, JANUARY 12, 3 P.M. PRESIDENT CARTER CHALLENGED ON SOCIAL PRIORITIES BY NATIONAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE FOR WOMEN. In its first meeting today with President Carter, the National Advisory Committee for Women, fulfilling its mandate to advise him on initiatives promoting equality for women, warned that the administration's anti-inflation program will impose additional burdens upon women in increased unemployment, cutbacks in social programs, postponement of comprehensive national health insurance . . . This news release, plus the cancellation of a previous meeting with the president in November, were given as the reasons for the firing. No matter that Abzug did not prepare the press release, nor was she in favor of cancelling the November W,M0U UNGeNTVEMANiy ESH £*****' meeting. As Schram remarked, "Bella was fired for being Abzug." Bella Abzug has the same effect on news people as do other forces of nature. Take the word ''hurricane," for example. It causes the collective journalistic mind to slip into automatic pilot, and results in phrases like "in the wake of destruction," "slammed into the coast" and "packing winds in excess of." So it is with the words "Bella Abzug." "Rude," "abrasive," "tactless" and "hat" spring readily to mind and pen. "An inescapable reaction to rudeness," said Rowland Evans and Robert Novak {Washington Post), who accused "the uncontrollable Bella" of "assaulting" Carter at the Friday meeting. Syndicated columnist Ellen Goodman surrendered her usual inventiveness to the cliched hordes. "Abzug ... no Tinkerbell . . . could benefit from six weeks at Army Tact School . . . the good ol' boys of the White House dropped the ax . . . with all the style and sensitivity of Attila the Hun . . . the bare-fisted fighter from New York . . . the White House thought they could safely decapitate-or should I say de-hat-Bella." The editorial cartoon on this page {Houston Post, January 24) illustrates some of the hazards of automatic-pilot journalism. Granted, an editorial cartoon is a subjective comment. But one has to assume that it is the product of the author's perception's of a particular incident or issue. Where did these perception's come from? Certainly not from the facts of the case. Jimmy Carter did not fire Abzug personally, nor did she react in a violent manner. On the contrary, her public appearances following her dismissal (ABC's Issues and Answers, NBC's Tomorrow show and many others) were models of civility and decorum, and the White House admitted afterwards that the whole affair had been handled badly. Besides which, she seldom wears a hat anymore. But that won't bother the image- makers. A hat is a great identifier. (The most popular image, for Americans, of China's vice premier Teng Hsiao Ping is that of a Mao-suited figure in a white cowboy hat. Bernard Kalb, on the CBS Morning News (February 5) was asked his impressions of the departing Teng. The image of Teng that was created by the media, said Kalb, was highly romanticized. He said he kept expecting to hear a reporter say "The vice premier quipped 'Hello.' " The people at the White House weren't the only ones who thought Abzug was "a fun story." House Majority Leader Jim Wright, D. Fort Worth, "couldn't resist the temptation" the following Monday, when he placed the traditional call to the White House to notify the president the 96th Congress had convened. "Good morning, Mr. President. I've got (House Republican Leader) John Rhodes and Bella Abzug and many of your other friends here." Carter's reply was not recorded, but Wright and those with him broke into laughter. The Houston Chronicle, in one of its few stories on the firing, headlined that one "Officials tease Carter with fake Abzug call." The Houston Post did better, with two days of Page 1 coverage, including a rather skimpy roundup of local re- action-"Local women's leaders support Abzug's firing." (For more reaction from Houston's feminist leaders, see pp. 12-14.) The Chronicle made no attempt to report on local reactions, but they did devote a Saturday Forum (letters to the editor) to the subject. A few sample questions offered to readers: "Do you think Mrs. Abzug brought her troubles on herself? ... if she had not tried to lecture (the president), do you think she might still be on the job? Do you think the president's refusal to put up with Mrs. Abzug's rather forceful and sometimes abrasive manner may have earned him good marks among many women voters?" It was predictable that Gloria Steinem, being a staunch Abzug ally, would draw her share of flak. (Incidentally, or not so incidentally, why is Steinem called "sharp—tongued editor of Ms., when Phyllis Schlafly gets by with "National Chairman of Stop ERA?") Evans and Novak, explaining that presidential aide Anne Wexler had pushed Carter to appoint Abzug last spring, said "Ms. Wex- ler's advice was partly shaped by threats from women's activist Gloria Steinem, Abzug's comrade in militancy, of dire retaliation if she did not get the job" and ". . . Steinem appeared like an avenging angel to denounce the president." (Note the subtle use of the word "comrade" to suggest communist tendencies-also a favorite of Bill Buckley's National Review for trashing feminist activists.) Meanwhile, Sarah Weddington, Carter's advisor on women's affairs, must have been spending a lot of time in the Rose Garden-she certainly came out smelling like one. There were several references to her being treated unkindly by Abzug and the committee. "There were efforts to undercut Weddington, and to go around her," reported Judy Mann in the Washington Post. Carter officials claimed that Abzug has been "Knifing Weddington in the back" when she wasn't snubbing her. On ABC's AM America (January 14), Weddington was interviewed by David Hartman and Sam Donaldson, both of whom tried, without success, to get her to comment on the manner in which Abzug was fired. "I don't think it's productive to talk about where various White House aides might have been on it," said Weddington. "There was not a close, personal relationship between the President and Ms. Abzug." "Is that why she was fired?" asked Donaldson. "Bella Abzug went out of that meeting and said some very nice things about the President, was called back in the White House and fired. Did you set her up? Was it fumbled?" "No," replied Weddington, "I think the committee members overwhelmingly after that meeting felt a sympathy with the President." Asked about the future of the committee, Weddington said, ". . . The two sides are beginning to talk to each other." Houston Breakthrough February, 1979