Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Broadside, Vol. 4, No. 2, February 1973
Page 7
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Broadside, Vol. 4, No. 2, February 1973 - Page 7. February 1973. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 12, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/5732/show/5730.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(February 1973). Broadside, Vol. 4, No. 2, February 1973 - Page 7. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/5732/show/5730

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Broadside, Vol. 4, No. 2, February 1973 - Page 7, February 1973, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 12, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/5732/show/5730.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Broadside, Vol. 4, No. 2, February 1973
Publisher National Organization for Women, Houston Chapter
Date February 1973
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Political activity--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Women--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • National Organization for Women
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location HQ1439 .H68 B75
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b3767173~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
Item Description
Title Page 7
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_080g.jpg
Transcript February 1973 BROADSIDE Page 7 Recommended Feminist Reading WOMEN AND MADNESS, by Phyllis Ches- ler, Doubleday & Co., $8.95. Critiques of the psychotherapeutic professions and their institutions are nothing new. Now Phyllis Chesler, a psychologist and a feminist, confronts the discipline of psychiatry and links it inextricably with the condition of women in a patriarchal society. Chesler's thesis is that in the male-dominated professions of psychology and psychiatry, and in a society which devalues women and socialized them to devalue themselves, judgments about mental health and mental illiness, forms of treatment and definitions of cure, are necessarily patriarchal. The norms for female behavior are determined by men, and are different from the norms for male behavior. A woman is classified as "healthy" or "neurotic" or "psychotic" according to "a male ethic of mental health" based on the invisible and sometimes explicit assumptions of patriarchal society. (For example, in at least one study the "normal" woman is listed as an unemployed housewife.) Chesler cites studies showing that a "predominantly female population...has been diagnosed, psychoanalyzed, researched and hospitalized by a predominantly male psychiatric population." In the last decade, 90 percent of American psychiatrists were male; female clinicians appear, on the basis of a study by Inge Broverman, to echo the professional bias and consensus of their male colleagues as to what constitutes mental health in women. The study also indicated that healthy women were assumed to differ from healthy men "by being more submissive, less independent, less adventurous, more easily influenced, less aggressive, less competitive, more excitable in minor crises, more easily hurt, more emotional, more conceited about appearance, less objective, and less interested in math and science." Thus, there would seem to be a double standard of mental health, as there has been for morality; and the situation of women in the patriarchy bears directly on what is considered neurosis or madness in women. As Chesler points out, the above description reflects the bias of the society outside the profession, a bias steam-ironed into women's lives by early training, education, intensive social pressure and, when necessary, punishment. There is much conjecture in this book and much that will surely be challenged and debated. However, there is no doubt that this book will become a pioneer contribution to the feminization of psychiatric thinking and practice. THE FEMININE FIX-IT HANDBOOK, by Kay B. Ward. Grosset & Dunlap, $5.95. Your favorite, but ancient lamp refuses to work. The small appliance repair shop can rewire it for $7.50 plus labor—a ridiculous amount considering the lamp is only worth $3.50. You suspect if you just knew how, you could fix it for the cost of new wire and a plug. If you live alone or if you live with someone who feels the answer to all household repairs is "just call the repair person," here is your answer. Not only is this an extremely helpful do-it-yourself text, author Ward obviously knows what she is talking about. Assuming that many of her sisters (and many of her brothers) have never really confronted a hammer or saw, Ward begins with basics, removing the veil of mystery from the world of drill and bit and threaded awl. Proceeding from that crash course in tools and their uses, she tells how to paint, hang paper, make minor plumbing and electrical repairs, restore furniture and a number of other minor household crises. She also provides a glossary of tool terms from ABRASIVE to WRENCH, that is invaluable for anyone who has never shopped in a hardware store. Better still, author Ward relates her book to the feminist experience. For example, she castigates the unknown male chauvinist who first named the "female" appliance plug. An indispensable book for anyone who likes to be free of dependence on the mercies of bloodthirsty repair persons. SANCTUARY NO MORE For 107 years a sanctuary for men only, the Harvard Club of New York City voted 2,097 to 695 to accept female members. President Albert Gordon promised women a "gracious" welcome, but member Johathan Morse gloomily predicted the demise of the club "and all the traditions it represents." MS. MAGAZINE SURGES AHEAD Ms. Magazine can safely be called a success. With a January print order of 530,000 copies, and reams of stories, articles, poems and appreciative letters flowing in, Ms. editors can relax. They no longer have to worry about saying it all in a few issues before the magazine folds. Patricia Carbine, editor-in- chief and publisher, says it is breaking records in magazine history for a six-month-old magazine. Subscription rates are $9 a year, while the newsstand copies sell for $1 each, says Ms. Carbine, "so we won't have to depend on the advertising community to keep the magazine alive. And we know, from the mail, that our readers read our ads as editorial material. Ads in our magazine have credibility." The magazine does not accept vaginal deodorant ads, bust development or weight-reducing ads. On the other hand, the editors are breaking ground with advertisements that previously have not appeared in women's magazines: records, books, liquor, automobiles. "We'll be the only women's magazine on that foreign car's advertising schedule this spring, and we're also talking to a tire company at this point," says Ms. Carbine. "The magazine is also starting a new section called 'Human Development'," she says, "consisting of display ads that are recruiting advertisements for personnel by big companies all over the country. And we have solid reasons why we think this will work. ITT ran a one-column ad with us for personnel that got more response for them than anything they'd run in any other major magazine."