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Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 3, No. 5, June 1978
Page 9
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Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 3, No. 5, June 1978 - Page 9. June 1978. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 3, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/567/show/565.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(June 1978). Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 3, No. 5, June 1978 - Page 9. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/567/show/565

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 3, No. 5, June 1978 - Page 9, June 1978, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 3, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/567/show/565.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 3, No. 5, June 1978
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date June 1978
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 9
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_541i.jpg
Transcript "We are a we have had people without to live our lives a country, without even a ghetto...essentially in men's worlds, separated from each other...We have not evolved our own street language, our own slang—the passwords that tell us we are of the same tribe. The feminist media is a means of creating—or unearthing our own language." —"From Us: Thoughts on the Feminist Media" the second wave, spring 1974 continued from page 3 Fifty more people helped us as copy editors, proofreaders, distributors. We set up a news room at the convention center and an office with editors and production people. We paired reporters with photographers and supplied them with beepers. We created this whole community to give delegates to the National Women's Conference a gift from the women of Houston; three 36-page papers, over 100 pages of news. Some people said, "Isn't it wonderful the IWY gave you a grant to do this project." Well, they didn't. We raised all the funds through advertising so that we could distribute the 30,000 daily copies free. What happened after IWY? The key people on the paper left in the week that followed. Janet went back to Pennsylvania. Barbara Lejuene, who typeset every word of all three issues, left for her home in Washington state. Connie Robertson-Cota, our art director, moved to Indiana. The phones were even quiet over Thanksgiving. There was this stillness after all the weeks of activity. You would think it would have been a welcome relief but we were never quite able to revel in the success of the convention — and for this reason. We had totally neglected the sale of the women's calendar ("Woman: Inner Reflection") at our IWY booth. In anticipation of the convention we more than doubled our print order - from 2,000 to 5,000 copies. Only 60 were sold at the convention. We had a $12,000 printing bill facing us. We didn't know where we would get the energy to take on another major project. Plus we had to get another issue of Breakthrough out in the next two weeks. Is that when Kathleen came in? Yes. In this very dark moment I was going through the IWY volunteer file and came upon the name of Kathleen Williamson. Somehow no one called her during the IWY but she expressed delight to help on production. Her fresh creative energy was responsible for getting that post-IWY issue out. Also, Victoria started her film criticism with that issue, until she moved to New Orleans in April. And Lynne Mutchler brought her computer skills to take on our typesetting. Why did Breakthrough suspend publication in May? I think we just never recovered from the exhaustion and the tremendous effort of the IWY and the burden of the calendars. The February issue was a little bit late and the March issue was even later because one of my dogs got really ill. This will show how little energy Breakthrough runs on. It was a terrible crisis period for about two weeks when I didn't know whether my dog, Boudu, would live or not. Then the day before he was going Women don't need drive, for a successful! career... from Cambridge Glen Condominiums As an independent, upwardly mobile woman, you're focusing a great deal of time and energy developing your career. With so much happening, the one thing you don't need to worry about is mobility to work. Cambridge Glen is a new adult Garden condominium community. It offers the convenience and excitement of an urban lifestyle with the privacy and security of a suburban community. Things like card controlled automobile access, intercom controlled pedestrian access, and covered parking all contribute to total peace of mind. In addition, composition shingled roof, fire walls, a fire alarm, and abundant use of brick provide personal property as well as investment protection. Located inside Loop 610, in the growing Plaza Del Oro planned community, Cambridge Glen is just 10 minutes from downtown Houston, the Galleria area, and Green- way Plaza. And just minutes from the Medical Center and Rice University. But just as important as security and convenience, Cambridge Glen offers you a home you'll feel good about coming home to. There are four spacious floor plans available, ranging from 986 sq.ft.at $39,950 to 1,174sq.ft. for $49,950. These floor plans include 9-foot ceilings downstairs, vaulted ceilings upstairs as well as "energy checked" insulation. Other standard amenities include a self-cleaning double oven, washer, dryer and refrigerator with ice maker, private patios and balconies, fireplace and wet bar. All this plus 95% financing with no closing costs, makes Cambridge Glen the perfect place to call home. Come see Cambridge Glen today. Gracious condominium living by Montgomery-Yoder Corporation. 8100 Cambridge Drive • 713 741-6245 to have major surgery, another ; dog attacked Angela as I was walking them to Hermann Park and broke her front leg. Gabrielle and I went to a women's press conference in Washington, D.C. in late March. When we got back, I had to pull together the primary issue for April. It was an enormous undertaking, working with reporters on in-depth stories and trying to make the news as current as possible. It was our best issue but it had taken so much out of us - time and all — that in the middle of typesetting the May issue when my dog became ill again, it took the last energy I had. When I got back to the office from the emergency room that Sunday morning, Gabrielle was there. She had just visited her dear friend, Olie Attermeier, in the hospital — Olie was critically ill and she died in July. We looked at each other across the table and quietly made the decision to take a break. What happened after that decision? We called a meeting of the women and men who had worked on the paper to discuss the energy crisis. They expressed a strong interest in using the summer time in the best way possible, almost like a sabbatical — to channel energy away from the production of the paper, to concentrate on the business end, to increase circulation, and to communicate with our readers about our progress in a shorter format newspaper. How do you envision the future of Breakthrough? I think we've run as long as we can on pure energy. Now we have to have a financial base. With our three years of publication behind us I feel that we will get the financial support needed to allow Breakthrough to operate as a professional news organization. That is our hope and that is our major goal. The business structure is one part of it, but we also see the paper broadening its perspective, to be more of a community newspaper, more of an alternative newspaper. Everything affects women — the Mass Transit Authority, the energy crises, Proposition 13 - and we want to bring a feminist perspective to all the news. We had all thought our turning point was the IWY. But our turning point is now. If Breakthrough is not here how will our stories be told? We will be back where we started, given our news by establishment media who judge the importance of a story by what sells or by its entertainment value. What has Breakthrough meant to you personally? Breakthrough has been the greatest experience of my life, in terms of working with people. Right now the irony is that we have never had a more compatible group of people. I would really miss that working together. We have all grown from the experience. But my personal life has become so intertwined with the paper, answering the telephone at 7 o'clock in the morning, or at midnight for that matter, that this sabbatical for me has been a good time for just getting outdoors again. I feel that it will be very healthy for the paper. We have not lived in balance. We can begin to now. JUNE 1978 HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH