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Broadside, Vol. 5, No. 9, September 1974
Page 8
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Broadside, Vol. 5, No. 9, September 1974 - Page 8. September 1974. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 25, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/5643/show/5638.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(September 1974). Broadside, Vol. 5, No. 9, September 1974 - Page 8. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/5643/show/5638

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Broadside, Vol. 5, No. 9, September 1974 - Page 8, September 1974, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 25, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/5643/show/5638.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Broadside, Vol. 5, No. 9, September 1974
Publisher National Organization for Women, Houston Chapter
Date September 1974
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Political activity--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Women--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location HQ1439 .H68 B75
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b3767173~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
Item Description
Title Page 8
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  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_113h.jpg
Transcript SPEAKING OF ATHLETES lately around the women's center, and in personal conversations with NOW members, I have often heard members of the softball team and/ar the Women in Sports Task Force referred to as "jocks." Personally, I object to this term and wonder where the people who use It are coming from. The word "jock" is a slang expression for a male athlete who is depicted as an imbecile, ape-like, crude and bumbling person whose only function in life is running over people on the athletic field. Therefore, the term is derogatory, and sexist as well. The nature of sports requires that a woman possess, among other things, intelligence, creativity, independence, aggressiveness, competitiveness, and a spirit of adventure. Most of these "male" Identified sex traits are also traits which are recognized as being essential to the success of the feminist movement, and one of the goals of women In the feminist movement is to rid themselves of "female" identified sex traits such as dependence, inactiveriess, submission, passiveness, etc., which have been forced upon them by a male oriented society. In addition, women athletes do not see themselves as "sex objects." They display a greater awareness of, and satisfaction with, their own bodies than do female non-athletes. This body "awareness" is seen by the majority of mental health authorities as being a prime requisite to a healthy self-image, a desirable characteristic. Society "teaches" members of both sexes that athletics for women are somehow harmful (probably because sports' do incorporate so many "male" identified sex traits, thus threatening male dominance) and, if women insist on becoming athletes anyway, they are viewed as "mavericks, dissidents" and, frequently, "unnatural." This same society teaches little girls and women to channel their natural instincts for physical expression into more acceptable "female" activities. Little boys play baseball and little girls stay at home learning to cook, sew, etc., thereby fulfilling their "expected" roles In life. Finally, there is an aesthetic quality to sports which must be experienced to be appreciated. I can see little difference except In society's view of things, in being an art lover, a music lover ar an athlete. Art lovers are visually involved, music lovers auditorily Involved, and athletes kinesthetically involved. Those who regard athletics as a plebeian activity are responding to the conditioning of male oriented society and displaying their own Ignorance as well. "Outside World" women who denigrate female athletes by calling them "jocks" are reinforcing the male myth. Whit does that say far feminists who are using the same terminology? Jan Cunningham Page 8