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NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 4, No. 8, August 1976
Page 7
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NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 4, No. 8, August 1976 - Page 7. August 1976. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 22, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/5204/show/5202.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(August 1976). NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 4, No. 8, August 1976 - Page 7. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/5204/show/5202

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 4, No. 8, August 1976 - Page 7, August 1976, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 22, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/5204/show/5202.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 4, No. 8, August 1976
Publisher National Organization for Women, Bay Area Chapter
Date August 1976
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • National Organization for Women
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .N682
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332563~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 7
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  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_352g.jpg
Transcript Women have made history; they simply have not been given credit for it" Unsung Heroines in American History To all appearances, women have trod lightly through the pages of American history,,, and it is almost impossible at times to pick up traces of their nearly invisible footsteps. In most classroom texts women have been either banished to footnotes or omitted entirely. As we celebrate our Bicentennial, therefore, we should take time to question this treatment, to look again at our heritage and see who the women were and why they have been ignored for so long. Even a cursory reexamination reveals extraordinary female figures, women who often ironically demonstrated many of the characteristics for which the historical male figures are acclaimed. A few examples will illustrate this fact. • Volumes have been written on the Puritans and their struggle for freedom of religion, yet few of us have heard of Anne Hutchinson. ANNE HUTCHINSON? In 1631, this courageous woman was brought to trial for practicing her religious beliefs by the very same Massachusetts Puritans who had insisted on their own right to worship as they pleased. Anne Hutchinson was found guilty of An- tinomianism and banished from Boston. She went to live in Rhode Island where she continued to champion the twin causes of freedom of speech and religion until she died in 1653. • Every schoolchild can tell the story of Paul Revere's ride, but nobody has ever heard of Sybil Ludington. SYBIL LUDINGTON? This sixteen-year old girl volunteered to ride through the countryside on the night of April 26, 1777, to rally the neighboring militiamen in support of the troops in Danbury, Connecticut. 2,000 British soldiers were raiding the supply center but, through the efforts of Ludington, the American forces were able to arrive in time to turn away the attack and drive the British back to their ships on Long Island Sound. Ludington rode 40 miles through darkened countryside to spread the alert. All of us are familiar with the military talents of William T. Sherman and Ulysses S. Grant, but who of has ever heard of Anna Ella Carroll. ANNA ELLA CARROLL? This woman was perhaps the military genius of the Civil War. She was the unrecognized and unacknowledged member of Lincoln's cabinet who planned the Tennessee campaign. This campaign, based on Carroll's maps and written plans and faithfully executed by U.S. Grant, is considered the turning point of the war, giving the Northern troops its first important victory and effectively marking the beginning of the end for the Southern forces. Not unexpectedly, Anna Ella Carroll was neither paid nor recognized for her achievement. There are countless other women who excelled, women who achieved in the face of almost universal discrimination. DR. MARY WALKER became the first and only woman to win the Congressional Medal of Honor, in 1866, for her courage and medical care during the Civil War. When she later became active in the Suffrage Movement, however, the Medal was recalled and never again given to a woman. • IDA WELLS carried on a solitary campaign after the Civil War against the practice of lynching. As co-owner of the Memphis Free Speech, she wrote dramatic columns about racial discrimination in the South. In 1892, she published an attack on the white community of Memphis for the lynching of three black men who had committed no crime. Because of her expose, her newspaper offices were destroyed and her life threatened. Wells continued her efforts, however, traveling the U.S. and Europe publicly speaking on the issue. • In 1896, DR. MARY HUNTLEY was graduated at the top of her class from the Department of Medicine at the University of Buffalo, but she couldn't get a hospital appointment because of her sex. • EMILY BALCH was a World War I pacifist who taught sociology and economics at Wellesley College until she was fired for her political views. In 1946, she was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. In every period of our history, in every field of endeavor, individual women have realized their potential, yet they remain largely unknown. In the world of ART: • MARY CASSATT was the only American ever considered talented enough to exhibit with the French Impressionists. Her work was acclaimed across Europe, yet Degas, the leading male Impressionist, said "I do not admit that a woman can paint like that." • VINNIE REAM, aged 18, sculpted the full-scale marble statue of Lincoln for the Capitol Rotunda in Washington, DC. JOIN N.O.W.: Clip and mail with your check to : Marjorie Randal, 1922 Redway, Houston 77062, I would like to become a member of Bay Area N.O.W. and National N.O.W. ($15) I want to Join, but can only afford $ . I am not a member, but would like to receive the NEWSLETTER for a year. ($4) to N.O.W. I would like to make a contribution of $ NAME _As a N.O.W. member, I authorize my name and address to be published on chapter roster. Home Phone Other Phone ADDRESS City and Zip Occupation and Employer Interests and/or skills which I can contribute to Bay Area N.O.W. projects: Criticism of Bay Area N.O.W.'s program, organization, goals: