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NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 4, No. 8, August 1976
Page 5
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NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 4, No. 8, August 1976 - Page 5. August 1976. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 26, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/5204/show/5200.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(August 1976). NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 4, No. 8, August 1976 - Page 5. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/5204/show/5200

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 4, No. 8, August 1976 - Page 5, August 1976, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 26, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/5204/show/5200.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 4, No. 8, August 1976
Publisher National Organization for Women, Bay Area Chapter
Date August 1976
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • National Organization for Women
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .N682
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332563~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 5
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_352e.jpg
Transcript Act NOW Act NOW Act NOW Individual Credit Files According to the "Washington Kiplinger Letter" (6/4/76), "an. idea to split credit files for marrieds is losing its steam. Government isn't so sure now that it wants separate files for each spouse..." The provision splitting the files from family units (indexed under the husband's name) is included in the Equal Credit Opportunity Act (Public Law 93-495) passed in 1974. A portion of the Act went into effect in October, 1975; however, the section regarding individual credit files will not become effective until October, 1976. In order to avoid delay or the possible rescission of this provision (credit bureaus prefer the male-biased status quo), it is necessary to send comments in favor of splitting the files from family units to the Secretary, Board of Governors, Federal Reserve Board, Washington, D. C. 20551. Be sure to cite Docket R-Q038 in your letter. Right to Choose Threatened by Constitutional Amendments After extensive debate, the Senate narrowly voted (47-40) to table Senator Helmls constitutional amendment to prohibit abortions. Now it appears that Senator Bartlett is preparing to bring up another constitutional amendment prohibiting abortion with the exception of saving the life of the mother when medically necessary. An enormous amount of anti-abortion mail has been received by many senators - some of whom are committed to having a full debate of the issue on the senate floor and therefore will vote against any tabling motion. It is important for members of congress to hear individually from their constituents on this issue. (At the Beaumont area NOW meeting, we learned that secretaries rate the mail received by their congressional bosses on a 10-point scale, with a handwritten letter getting top score, handwritten postcard fewer points but still more than a typewritten letter. Kinda sad news for the millions of American women who believed, typing was a female skill that men respected.)" Discriminatory Insurance Regulations The State of Texas will hold hearings in November on Insurance Regulations that discriminate by sex or marital status. Testimony is needed. If you can testify or know someone who can, contact Rep. Sarah Weddington in Austin. From Equal Rights Monitor States Charged with Title IX Violations Forty-one states are risking >nme $3.4 billion in federal education aid, by violating basic requirements of federal law barring sex discrimination in education, according to formal charges filed with the government recently. Federal civil rights officials have been asked by the Project on Equal Education Rights i PEER) to investigate the infractions under Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972. PEER filed complaints against the 41 state agencies after a survey showed that all but 10 states have neglected to take several initial steps to comply with the 1972 rights law. Title IX, which guarantees equality of the sexes in schools and colleges, also applies to the state agencies responsible for public education in each state. Failure to obey the law can lead to the loss of federal funds. A large portion of federal education aid goes to the states for distribution to local school districts and colleges. ^0. These steps, spelled out in a regulation issued last summer, include: checking agency practices to see that they are consistent with the law, letting agency employees and others know about their rights under the law. setting up a formal process to resolve sex bias charges, and appointing a staff person to head up an effort to assure equal treatment for both sexes. "They sound like technicalities1' commented PEER Director Holly Knox, "but if an agency takes these requirements seriously, it can tackle Its own sex bias problems without risking interference from federal enforcement officials." "State education agencies work quietly outside the public spotlight," said Knox, "but they have a powerful impact on public education. When state officials break the law guaranteeing equal opportunities for „irls and women, it affects students and teachers in every school district in the state." State agencies' own violations. Knox maintained, undercut state efforts to help local school districts meet their obligations under Title IX. "The states seem to be raying "Do a> 1 say, not do as I do," she noted. From Equal Rights Monitor Sex Bills Die: No ERA Although numerous proposals to eliminate sex discriminatory laws were made in the Nevada legislature last session, State Senator Norman Hilbrecht (Democrat-Las Vegas) says that over 407r of them were killed in Committee. Speaking before a group of Parents Without Partners recently, Hilbrecht stated that many of the bills bogged down in extensive debates regarding community property, probate, tenancy, and domestic relations laws. "States can, of course, enact legislation prohibiting discrimination on the basis of sex," declared Hilbrecht, who favors adoption of the Equal Rights Amendment. "But an analysis of what the Nevada legislature did in the last session, when for the first time it addressed itself to discrimination on the basis of sex, would illustrate this is not a satisfactory solution." "If freedom from sex discrimination is a right which should be guaranteed throughout the United States," the Senator added, "then the only way it can be effected is through a Constitutional Amendment."