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NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 7, No. 5, May 1979
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NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 7, No. 5, May 1979 - Page 10. May 1979. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 23, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/5010/show/5007.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(May 1979). NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 7, No. 5, May 1979 - Page 10. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/5010/show/5007

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 7, No. 5, May 1979 - Page 10, May 1979, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 23, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/5010/show/5007.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 7, No. 5, May 1979
Publisher National Organization for Women, Bay Area Chapter
Date May 1979
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • National Organization for Women
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location HQ1101 .N682
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332563~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
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Title Page 10
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Transcript Philip siater - ly/o rem puasvrr of lonbunbss Women and Chiidrm Firtt The emotional and Intellectual poverty of the housewife's role is nicely expressed in the universal complaint: "I get to talking baby talk with no one around all day but the children." There are societies in which the domestic role works, but in those societies the housewife is not isolated. She is either part of a large extended family household in which domestic activities are a communal effort, or participates in a tightly knit village community, or both. The idea of imprisoning each woman alone in a small, separate, and self-contained dwelling is a modern invention, dependent on an advanced technology. In Moslem societies, for example, the wife may be a prisoner but at least she is not in solitary confinement. In our society the housewife may move about freely, but since she has nowhere to go, and isn't a part of anything anyway, her prison needs no walls. For a middle-class woman this is in striking contrast to her premarital life. In school she's embedded in an active group life with constant emotional and intellectual stimulation. Marriage typically eliminates this way of life for her, and children deliver the coup de gr&ce. Her only significant relationship tends to be with her husband, who is absent most of the day. Most of her social and emotional needs must be satisfied by her children, who are hardly equal to the task. Furthermore, since she's supposed to be molding them into superior beings, she can't lean too heavily on them for her own needs, although she's sorely tempted to do so. This is the most vulnerable point in the whole system. Even if the American housewife were not a rather deprived person, it would be the height of vanity for anyone to assume that an unformed child could tolerate such massive inputs of one person's personality. In most societies the impact of the mother's character defects is diluted by the presence of many other nurturing agents. In middle-class America the mother not only tends to be the exclusive daytime adult contact of the child, but also has a mission to create a near-perfect being. This means that every maternal quirk, every maternal hangup, and every maternal deprivation is experienced by the child ar heavily amplified noise from which there is no escape. Maternal Overload Societies in which deprived mothers turn to their sons for what they cannot obtain from male adults tend to produce men who are vain, warlike, boastful, competitive, sadistic, and skittish toward women. They have great fear of losing self-control, of becoming dependent on women, of weakness. They often huddle together in male gangs.7 Middle-class American males fit only part of this description (although American foreign policy is deeply rooted in machismo attitudes). One reason may be that in societies that produce this kind of male, the mother- son relationship is highly sexualized. But a seductive mother in a society that gives the child many caretakers has nothing like the impact she has in a society like ours, where she is almost the whole world to the child. This perhaps accounts for the sexlessness of American housewives as a class. It's as if there were some unconscious recognition of the fact that even ordinary feminine seductiveness, given the magnification motherhood receives in our society, would be disorganizing to JthZJEfY- 1 Wednesday, April U, 1979 %<j % MIfiHT CM IB REVIEWS §5 "* FEMME GROUP HEAD SCOLDS LV. SHOWS FOR SELLING SEX Las Vegas, April 10. ! Las Vegas is a mate fantasyland where showgirls disport as sex objects in a "distasteful kind of commercialism," scolded Bella Ab- zug's replacement on the National Advisory Committee for Women. Marjorie B. Chambers, New Mexico feminist and educator appointed jby President Carter in January to Jchair the committee after he fired 'Abzug, was the opening session keynote speaker of the American Per- (Continued on page 85) 2 Male Types Prime Subjects For Divorce Athens, Ga. (AP) - A University of Georgia sociologist says two types of males he identifies as cowboys and playboys probably are prime candidates for divorce and emotional maladjustment. And Dr. Jack Balswick, in a five-year study of the "inexpressive male" syndrome, says the study shows the strong, silent types are headed for trouble in interpersonal relationships. He said the male personality typified by John Wayne's movie roles is characterized by a "culturally acquired male image" that declares tenderness and affection toward women to be unmanly. Similarly, he said the playboy's values of resourcefulness and shrewdness dictate he/'play it cool" in love relationships. • And he said, "It is part of my thesis that the inexpressive male can reform with positive reinforcement from a loving, trusting spouse." s Shows (Continued from page 1), sonnel & Guidance Assn. confab, at Convention Center. Chambers went on to chide APGA membrs, "As long as a woman is an object to be looked at, period, she isn't a human being ... What I find offensive — and not in a puritanical sense"— is the selling of a chorus line with almost nothing on. You see the same kind of pattern in prostitution. "What else are they selling on those stages where sex is not a joyous kind of thing between twopeople but displayed for commercial reasons or put on a pedestal? If s an unhealthy situation psychologically," the national prez of American Assn. of University Women declared. . m Reply to her observation was immediate from dancers and showgirls who people the marry production extravaganzas on the Strip. At the Dunes where "Casino de Paris" is playing into its third year, the show's dance director Pat Mc: Kechnie fired back, "Our dancers started their training when they began to walk. We have dancers who have come to us from the Royal Ballet and the San Francisco Ballet, professionals, who have devoted their lives to the art of the dance." The Tropicana's "Folies Ber- gere" rep, Larry Lee, defended dancers male and female. ''Our girls, along with the girls and boys from the other shows on the Strip, helped Vassili Sulich form the Nevada Ballet Theatre at UNLV. When a tv producer comes to town, he hires girls from our show for the dancing roles because he knows that they have the training and experience to carry out the most difficult assignments." Donn Ardent principal assistant at MGM Grand's "Hallelujah Hollywood," Folliott Le Coque, chided Chambers for being so misinformed. 'The positions in our troupe are highly sought after. We hire about 1% of the people who come in for an audition —that's 1% of those with professional dance training. The others are not even auditioned" a male child. Since the American mother is omnipresent and so intensely committed to her role, she must be defused, as it were. Her desexualization is necessary in order not to add unduly to the already overwhelming maternal input the child receives.