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NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 8, No. 7, July 1980
Page 6
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NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 8, No. 7, July 1980 - Page 6. July 1980. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 26, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4997/show/4992.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(July 1980). NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 8, No. 7, July 1980 - Page 6. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4997/show/4992

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 8, No. 7, July 1980 - Page 6, July 1980, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 26, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4997/show/4992.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 8, No. 7, July 1980
Publisher National Organization for Women, Bay Area Chapter
Date July 1980
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • National Organization for Women
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .N682
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332563~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
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Title Page 6
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File Name femin_201109_399f.jpg
Transcript Your Money Our Lives or In 1894, Mary Elizabeth Garrett and four friends raised $500,000 for the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine—on the condition that equal admission requirements be applied to both men and women. working women take heart coronaries not the price of paychecks The notion that women who go out for better-paying jobs do so at the risk of heaft disease and other stress-related ailments has been debunked by a recent National Institutes of Health (NIH) study. Doctors Suzanne Haynes and Manning Feinleib used data from the longterm Framingham Heart Study to compare coronary heart disease (CHD) rates among "housewives", women working outside the home, and male workers. Among the major findings: • Women working outside the home do not experience higher rates of heart disease than women working inside the home, when both populations are compared as groups. t However, women in clerical positions (secretaries, stenographers, bank clerks, sales personnel) have nearly double the rate of heart disease (10.6%) that housewives have. • The risk of heart disease is higher among workinq women who are or have been married, and increases with number of children. • If a woman in a clerical position ' has children and is married to a man . doing bluecollar work, her risk of heart disease is 21.3% greater than that of the women who stays in the home. • The most si gnificantx predictors of coronary heart disease among women in clerical occupations are suppressed hostility, having a nonsupportive boss, and lack of job mobility. Dr. Haynes noted that "the Framingham data showed that employment by women, in itself, is not related to an increased risk of coronary heart disease. In fact, the women who were employed the longest period of time—the single, working women—had the lowest rate of CHD." Widespread "concern" about the effect of paying jobs on women's health did not, of course, surface until women began to move up out of tfce cltrijCil ranks in serious numbers and threaten previously all-male bastions. Then we were treated to very touching displays liriinia women boycotting oiia stale ALEXANDRIA, Va. (AP) - The Virginia division of the American Association of University Women won't be troWtng its 1982 state conventions in Virginia. The group voted Saturday to hold the meetings in states rhat have ratified the Equal Rights Amendment, mean- iM-tn^ Virginia women will take their state convention pfflside the state for the first time. Elaine Lailas, the gftmp's president, says plans are in the works to hold 'tpeflf^; of two state conventions in 1982 in Maryland ,ajjjcl the second in either West Virginia or Tennessee. of consideration about our supposed "sacrifice" of health to career. About this time last year the papers and women's magazines were full of dire predictions that women heading for the board room would instead end up in the cardiac intensive care unit* just like men. This was, of course, another ploy by the patriarchy to discourage women from doing any kind of work we damned well please. Stories about this alleged "risk" made page 1 and the wire services• Stories about how fulfilling, better-paying jobs are better than being underpaid, abused by a tyrannical boss, hassled by raising a family on two inadequate paychecks, and bored by the deadening sameness of most clerical work—those stories will be back among the truss ads, if anywhere at all. The other story to come out of this research, and which will likewise not be reported in most mass media, is that ALL women's work is stressful. Regardless of employment status (currently employed, housewife, unemployed, retired), women reported more symptoms of emotional stress than men. The special problems of mothers who work outside the home are merely added to the already high load of stress most women carry around. Men, of course, have it easier in all cases. And this fnay ultimately produce some" ;very ironic changes. While men, with their apparently inferior physiques, are dropping dead of heart disease at astounding rates once they get into Jobs with decent paychecks, tougher, sturdier women will be moving right along. Compared to running a house with a large family, running the aberage corporation isnTt particularly difficult. Compared to running a household AND holding down a clerical job, business management is a piece of cake. The final possibility suggested by this analysis of the Framingham Heart Study data is that lesbians—most Of whom are among the "single working women" cited above—hive the healthiest hearts of all. The report on which this article 1s based appeared in the American Journal of Public Health, February, 1980, Vol. 70, No. 2, p. 133. The fact that the senior autlior on this study of women and heart disease was a woman 1s probably not incidental. by jants kelly off our backs (ISSN #0OX-O071) 1724 20th Street nw Washington, d.c. 20009 name address subscription rates for one year $]4 contributing $ 7 regular $13 overseas regular $20 businesses ani instftaions