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NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 8, No. 8, August 1980
Page 5
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NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 8, No. 8, August 1980 - Page 5. August 1980. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 23, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4983/show/4978.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(August 1980). NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 8, No. 8, August 1980 - Page 5. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4983/show/4978

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 8, No. 8, August 1980 - Page 5, August 1980, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 23, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4983/show/4978.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 8, No. 8, August 1980
Publisher National Organization for Women, Bay Area Chapter
Date August 1980
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • National Organization for Women
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .N682
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332563~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 5
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  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_400e.jpg
Transcript HOUSTON TO COPENHAGEN Six women from third world countries answered questions from eight Houston women who spoke to them via satellite TV and cable telephone on July 21 at Channel 8. The women were attending the mid-decade conference of the International Womens Decade which began in 1975 in Mexico City. India, Morocco, Tonga, Guyana, South Africa and Nicaragua were represented. ive could zee them on TV but they could only hear our voices. Except for Nicaragua no significant progress was reported. Women are still less educated and less fed than men. Survival is a major goal and the first struggle is for life, then liberation as a people (South Africa) before women will differentiate themselves and struggle for their own rights. Some of their statements astounded us. Unfortunately the format did not permit a real dialogue so we could not clarify facts and issues. Some highlights: Nicaragua claims that since the year old revolution, women are 40$ of the government, (What percent in decision making?) Rape is no problem at all, (concurrence from other 5). //omen can choose to have a baby, contraception and abortion are legal (also in India). In South Africa both male and female are confined to manual labor.-.-, no higher education is permitted to blacks. Even informal meetings of women have been prohibited because of the ban on assembly. Birth control is viewed as genocide by a black population which is threatened economically and in every way. Women are encouraged to take jobs overseas in white homes of Europeans so that blacks will be fewer. Circumcision is "still widely practiced on women and misunderstood is not dangerous unless .the woman is malnourished" III (laybe if you don't have it, you don't know what you are missing?) Situation is worsening. It is necessary to eradicate apartheid. The U.S. is preventing this occurence under the guise of helping 3.A. industrially from which blacks are excluded. We talked afterward about a continuing dialogue with women abroad, arranged through Egypt and a contact with Jihan Sadat. Sounds crazy? Sounds possible! Twiss Butler was there and Jeanne Saletan was a questioner. Our questions were: :ie are concerned about the problem of radiation from nuclear energy, the damage to the genetic pool and the fact that"women are the usual caretakers of damaged children. How is the conference addressing this? Jo women in your country have the right to control their ovm bodies and in what way does the government intervene? If, in your country, organized religion discourages family planning, what economic resources is that religious organization willing to commit to ensure the health and welfare of the children? How are girls in your country being educated to earn money on an equal basis with men and become economically independent? What are your government and society doing to support the family unit at a time when women are increasingly entering the work force? Such as child care, care of the elderly and broadening the role of men in domestic responsibilities? (laughter and tittering from respondants). What have you found to be the most effective means of putting women in decision making posts in your country so that they are influential in strengthening channels of peace and disarmament? Are women subject to military conscription in your country? If so, do they receive equal benefits with males such as employment advantages, training, network contacts? Since the Mexico City conference, women in the U.S. have not made any gains toward constitutional equality (ERA), //hat legal gains or losses have women in your countries experienced? (India has had a constitution from the date of its independence which has prohibited discrimination on the basis of SEX, creed.and caste. But it is not enforced.) Whom do you represent the governments of your countries, the women there or the society? (ambiguous replies). vie were disturbed and depressed after the session. Were our questions irrelevant? How can we assist each other? Are they doomed to repeat our history in their quest for a better life through industrial development and technology? Is that the ONLY way to develop what we want to develop for a better life?