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NOW News Bay Area Chapter, April 1990
Page 7
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NOW News Bay Area Chapter, April 1990 - Page 7. April 1990. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 11, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/490/show/488.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(April 1990). NOW News Bay Area Chapter, April 1990 - Page 7. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/490/show/488

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

NOW News Bay Area Chapter, April 1990 - Page 7, April 1990, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 11, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/490/show/488.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title NOW News Bay Area Chapter, April 1990
Publisher National Organization for Women, Bay Area Chapter
Date April 1990
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • National Organization for Women
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .N682
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332563~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 7
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File Name femin_201109_312g.jpg
Transcript Research for Men Only Doctors could use more data on treating women The huge research project included 22,071 volunteer subjects. And the main conclusion, published in 1988, was headline material: taking small doses of aspirin can reduce the risk of a heart attack. But women who read the fine print discovered that the study had little apparent relevance to them. Reason: not one of the 22,071 subjects was a woman. Admittedly, the overall risk of heart disease is greater in men, but after women reach menopause that difference in susceptibility largely disappears. Many older women would have THE FORGOTTEN FEMALE been interested to know whether taking aspirin would improve their chances of avoiding a heart attack. The for-men-only bias of the aspirin study was not unusual. As an article in test "week's Journal of the American Medi- cal Association points out, medical research often appears to ignore women. In studies of everything from the link between smoking and cataracts to the benefits of eating fish after having heart attacks, the subjects have all been men. That concerns some medical experts and political leaders. In December the Congressional Caucus for Women's Issues asked for a review of National Institutes of Health grants in the past two years to see whether the studies fairly represented women. The report is due in April. Says Representative Pat „ Schroeder, a Colorado Democrat: "At this point, doctors just aren't getting the kind of guidance they need when they try to prescribe to women." In most cases, if a drug is proved effective in men, it will do the same job in wom- en. But not always. The information gap becomes important when the sexes respond differently to a given treatment. For example, the menstrual cycle is known to alter the effect of some antidepressant drugs. For many drugs and treatments, doctors simply cannot be sure how well they will work in women. Because of the predominance of male-only studies, physicians do not have clear scientific proof that women can lower their cholesterol with drugs and low-fat diets. For similar reasons, little is known about the specific effects of aids drugs on women. Why are women so often excluded from medical studies? Cost is usually the reason. In a well-designed trial, the subjects must be as similar as possible so that the treatment is the only variable. A study that includes both men and women must generally be larger-and more expensive-than a males-only trial to have the same degree of statistical validity. Though the costs may be steep, an increase in testing of women is called for. As for pharmaceuticals that are already available, some researchers feel that the Government should make a greater effort to monitor their effects on women. The one-sided nature of medical testing reflects a broader neglect of female health issues, some experts say. For example, the nih reportedly spends just 13% of its budget studying women's health. The research shortfall, observes Dr. Florence Haseltine, director of the nih's Center for Population Research, has left uncertainties on many vital questions, including the causes of infertility and the effect of diet on breast cancer. -By Andrew Purvis 4 [Apr. 1990] SPINNERS Spiderwoman is the Creator (spinner) of the world (web), according to the Pueblo People. She wove a web-thread to the top of each beings head—a connection to the love of the Weaver of the world. The web and weaving are traditional symbols of destiny. And the archetype of woman as WEAVER and SPINNER is an ancient one. It is good to remember that the threads that form our life are within our own hands—to be woven as we see fit. OUR NEXT NOW MEETING!!! The public is invited to the Bay Area Chapter of NOW, which will meet at A UNITING CHURCH, 979 Reseda, in Clear Lake City. The church is at the corner of Reseda and El Camino. Our program will be a talk and discussion of World-Wide Sexism, and our guest speaker will be Stephanie Shipp, who studied and worked for a year in France. Comments from the Visitors and members will be both encouraged and welcomed. For further info: 944-0033 or 474-4065.