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NOW News Bay Area Chapter, April 1990
Page 6
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NOW News Bay Area Chapter, April 1990 - Page 6. April 1990. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 11, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/490/show/487.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(April 1990). NOW News Bay Area Chapter, April 1990 - Page 6. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/490/show/487

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

NOW News Bay Area Chapter, April 1990 - Page 6, April 1990, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 11, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/490/show/487.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title NOW News Bay Area Chapter, April 1990
Publisher National Organization for Women, Bay Area Chapter
Date April 1990
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • National Organization for Women
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .N682
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332563~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 6
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File Name femin_201109_312f.jpg
Transcript rity perpetuates itself from generation to generation. The underfathered boy develops a fragile, ambivalent male identity. To compensate for this insecurity in adolescence and adulthood, he distances himself from women and "women's work." And what is most obviously women's work? Caring for young children. So he avoids nurturing contact with his own sons and unwittingly contributes to their development of insecure masculinity, dread of women, and woman-rejecting behavior. is there any escape from this vicious circle? Since cultures differ in the extent to which they emphasize the private/public split, it may be instructive to look at one culture that minimizes the gender roles between men and women. 1 will draw on my own research experience with the Pygmy nation o\ Central Africa, who live as hunter-gatherers. Among the Pygmy there are some gender role differences, but the smallness and mobility of the group require close cooperation among all members. Women and children help with some of the hunting, and a woman can call on her husband to care for an infant while she is cooking. Grandparents of both sexes care for toddlers while both parents hunt and gather. Here the public/private split has very little relevance Of particular interest is the tact that huntei-gatherers' flexibility in gender roles and cooperation is accompanied by greater intellectual similarity between men and women. What can we learn from this about our own situation? Some cultural anthropologists say that it is imperative to move in two directions: Men must be integrated into the domestic sphere, sharing in the socialization of children and performing domestic tasks; and women must participate equally with men in the public world of work and culture. Only then can women's status be elevated. Such changes do not turn men into women and women into men. What is vital in upgrading the status of women's work is not eliminating the presence of gender roles, but rather the degree of proximity, cooperation, and role flexibility that men and women share. In fact, even when men and women do perform a common task—such as child care—they approach it rather differently, and many of these stylistic differences turn out to be very much worth preserving. —Mary Stewart Van Leeuwen Daughters of Sarah Twentieth century housework: Less drudgery, but just as much work Excerpted with permission from the forthcoming book Gender and Grace- Love. Work, and Parenting in a Changing Work! (Intervarsity Press.DownersGrove,Illinois,1990). This excerpt also appeared in the Christian women's magazine Daughters of Sarah (Sept./Oct. 1989). • One in four Texans of voting age is functionally illiterate, and that number is growing. Advances in household tech- nology during this century have had two principal effects. i he first is further separating the work ofmenandchildrcn from jthe work of women; the second is greatly increasing the productivity of the average housewife. Prior to industrialization (which, in the United States, is prior to 1860). American households produced goods intended for sale in the marketplace, but they also produced goods and services that were intended tor use at home: foodstuffs, clothing, medicines, meals, laundry, health care, and much more. Durinu the second phase ol industrialization (after 1910), the household con- tinued to be where meals, clean laundry, healthy children, and well-led adults were produced*—housewives continuing to be the ones producing them. What did change, however, was the level of productivity; Modern technology enabled the American house wife of 19M) ;o do singlehandedly what her counterpart of 1850 needed a stall of three or four to do-maintain a middle-class standard ol health and cleanliness. Modern household technology has created two misconceptions about housework. One is that households no longer produce anything particularly important, which leads to the second misconception, that housewives no longer have that much work to do. Both notions are false, deriving from an incomplete understanding of the nature of these particular technologic al changes. Modem labor-savingdeviceselimi- nated drudgery, not labor. Before industrialization, women fed^ clothed, and nursed their families by preparing (with the help of their husbands and children) food,clothing, and medication. In the post-industrial age. women feed, clothe, and nurse their families (without much direct assistance from anyone else) by cooking, cleaning, driving, shopping, and waiting. The nature of the work has changed, but the necessity to do it remains. It is questionable if all the mechanical inventions yet made have lightened the day's toil of any human being. John Stuart Mill (1806-1873) —Ruth Schwartz Cowan Excerpted with permission from More Work for Mother: The Ironies of Household Technology from the Open Hearth to the Microwave, by Ruth Schwartz Cowan. Copyright ©1983 by Basic Books, hu ..New York.