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NOW News Bay Area Chapter, April 1990
Page 5
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NOW News Bay Area Chapter, April 1990 - Page 5. April 1990. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 23, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/490/show/486.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(April 1990). NOW News Bay Area Chapter, April 1990 - Page 5. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/490/show/486

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

NOW News Bay Area Chapter, April 1990 - Page 5, April 1990, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 23, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/490/show/486.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title NOW News Bay Area Chapter, April 1990
Use and Reproduction In Copyright
Date April 1990
Publisher National Organization for Women. Bay Area Chapter
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Feminism
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • National Organization for Women
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location HQ1101 .N682
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332563~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 5
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_312e.jpg
Transcript ALL CONTRIBUTIONS ARE WELCOMED AT NOW NEWS, them to: D.J.Watkins P.O.Box 983 LaMarque#TX. 77568 Just mail A view from other cultures: Must men fear "women's work"? Anthropologists have found that around the world whatever is considered "men's work" is almost universally given higher status than "women's work." It in one culture it is men who build houses and w omen who make baskets, then that culture will see housebuilding as more important. In another culture, perhaps right next door, the reverse may be true, and basket-weaving will have higher social status than house-building. Anthropologists agree that biology is not a sufficient explanation ol male dominance. Follow ing are three different theories anthropologists have suggested to account tor the universality of male dominance and female subordination. • Nature Versus Culture: In all cultures women are seen as closer to nature than men, whereas men are seen as more involved with culture than women. Since the cultural is universally valued more lhan the merely natural, women, by being closer to nature, are therefore devalued. Women arc considered closer to nature than men because their bodies share the same reproductive functions as non-human female mammals. These involve more time, energy, and bodily risk than men's reproductive role. Men therefore have more freedom and energy to invest in technology, trade, games, arts, politics, and religion. And since women spend more time with young children, who are born incontinent and unsociali/.ed and thus seem more like animals, women are also seen as more connected to nature because of their care of "unacculluratcd" children. Because of this, women are often seen as more "childlike" themselves. • Domestic Versus Public: Although women's reproductive activities do not inevitably force them to keep their activities close to home, women are more apt than men to do domestic tasks that are easily combined with child care. For the same reason men are more likely to engage in "public" activities that take them out of the home and away from the children. These public, male-dominated activities almost always have commanded more cultural respect than the domestic, less visible activities of women. • Object Relations and Family Life: Psychologists have traced the process by which children become aware of being male or female. It is not until around age three that a child is able to reason that he or she is either a boy or a girl, and alwavs will be. From that time on, one of a child's developmental tasks is to become emotionally secure and happy about being either a boy or a girl. 1 lere is where the role of mothers as almost exclusive child rearers begins to matter. Both little girls and little boys are naturally attracted by the nurturance and apparent power of the mother, and want to be like her. But a little boy soon finds out that he can't grow up to be like Mommy. He must be like Daddy—the big male person he sees only a short time mornings and evenings. The boy is caught in a double-bind in that he cannot stay attached to his mother; yet his role model for imitation is largely absent.Thus his sense of being securely male is less solid and he may nurse deep and unconscious doubts about his ability to cope with the male role. But as the boy grows older, he begins to realize that being male is supposed to be a privilege, and if men are "real men" they are socially more important than women. Already somewhat insecure in his masculinity, he must now try all the harder to prove to himself and the world that he is a real man. How to do this? The safest way is to have as little to do with women and their activities as possible, to repress and deny any "womanly" qualities or impulses in himself. In extreme cases he may do this by openly scorning or even mistreating women. Or a man may simply avoid women except when he has domestic and sexual needs to be filled, spending the rest of his time in visibly and exclusively male groups. Or paradoxically, he may idealize women, "placing them on a pedestal." This too keeps them at a safe distance, but is often accompanied by impossible demands of "womanly perfection" from them as well. In some cultures, men may seesaw between attitudes of scorn and idealization, a common feature of the "machismo" cull in many Latin American societies. In such cultures, aggressive displays of masculinity may alternate with reverence for the Virgin Mary and heavy-handedness toward the women in one's own family. Whatever strategies arc used, they allow an insecure man to mask w hat amounts to an unconscious "dread of women." His earliest associations are still of a mother who seemed all-powerful. When combined with his early deprivation of an available male role model, the result may be a deeply repressed yet powerful conviction that women can somehow strip him of his masculine identity. In this way we can see how masculine insecu-