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NOW News Bay Area Chapter, April 1990
Page 4
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NOW News Bay Area Chapter, April 1990 - Page 4. April 1990. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 23, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/490/show/485.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(April 1990). NOW News Bay Area Chapter, April 1990 - Page 4. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/490/show/485

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

NOW News Bay Area Chapter, April 1990 - Page 4, April 1990, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 23, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/490/show/485.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title NOW News Bay Area Chapter, April 1990
Use and Reproduction In Copyright
Date April 1990
Publisher National Organization for Women. Bay Area Chapter
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Feminism
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • National Organization for Women
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location HQ1101 .N682
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332563~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 4
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_312d.jpg
Transcript work on improving the conditions in their homes. This had the added advantage that only one wage would need to be paid—to the man of the house—to support a working-class family. Both women and men protested vigorously: the women because they were accustomed to providing for themselves; the men because they resented being made suddenly responsible for i^ir wives and children (compulsory education and eni Id labor laws had barred children, too, from the factories). "The plebeians rioted," says Mich. "And the crowd was led, more often than not, by its women." The rioting went on until what lllich mischievously calls "the enclosure of women"—the transformation of women intohousewives—was completed. In 1737, more than 98 percent of married women in England worked outside the home. By 1911, more than 90 percent were employed solely as housewives. And this pattern was repealed throughout the industrialized world. Perhaps if women had enjoyed the support of their men from the beginning, they might have been able to resist these pressures on them to provide free domestic services. But the industrial revolution created a split between working-class men and women by, as lllich puts it. "making working men wardens of their domestic women." A similar antagonism between the sexes can be observed today in developing countries where the introduction of cash crops and wage labor has given men—but not women—access to money. The men feel the money is theirs; the women resent their lack of control over the family's income. Today the carrots and sticks used to force women into domestic work are no longer necessary. We are trained for specific gender roles from the day we are born. So powerful is our training that even the massive influx of women back into the labor force in recent years has had little effect on the division of labor in our homes. This is because women are trained to take care of their \ovcd ones. This means that the housewife role includes much more than the sheer drudgery of providing clean socks. It is also a cool hand on a feverish forehead in the early hours; boiling his eggs exactly the way he likes them; flowers on the table; organizing a treasure hunt for Easter eggs. . . . Domestic labor has become fused in our minds with love. It is probably not necessary to point out here that men do not appear to have the same problem with limiting their devotion. While this is lamentable in many ways, there is a part (a very small part) of me that sympathizes with them. Men perceive that equating love and domestic work is a trap. They fear that to get involved with housework would send them hurtling into the bottomless pit of self-sacrifice that is women's current caring role. As soon as they do attempt a smidgin of housework, they often find themselves caught up in a wrangle with women about "standards" of cleanliness—a wrangle that is really about deciding when enough is enough. If housework really were only about providing clean socks, then men might be more prepared to do their share. Women have to unpick this confusion of domestic labor (which has its limits) and love. This is not to suggest that we should stop loving. Just that we should stop equating loving with unpaid domestic service as if the two were interchangeable. Ironing shirts yet more perfectly does not increase the sum of human happiness. —Debbie Taylor New Internationalist Excerpted with permission from the global issues magazine New Internationalist (March I9H8).Subscriptions:$3()/yr.(I2 issues) from New Internationalist, Bo.x 1143, Lew\ston, NY 14092. Back issues: $3 from same address. Cunningham wins a 'First' award GALVESTON — The national Institute on Drug Abuse has awarded a First Award to Kathryn A. Cunningham, Ph.D., a UTMB Assistant Professor of Pharmacology k Toxicology, for a five-year, $350,000 study on "The Limbic Neuropsychopharmacology of Cocaine.' ' A First Award signifies the recipient is a promising young investigator conducting research worthy of recognition and support. Dr. Cunningham and her team of Kenneth Johnson, Ph.D, and Patrick Callahan hope to use the grant to learn about the processes that contribute to behavioral sensitization, a progressive enhancement of some cocaine-induced behaviors which could underlie the development of psychological disorders (paranoid psychosis, for example) in human drug abusers. They also plan to investigate pharmalogical methods of counteracting or blocking the development of behavioral sensitization and associated neurophysiology changes. Dr. Cunningham says the limbic system of the bram, which is involved in mood,emotion and motivation, contains significant amounts of chemical messengers called monoamines, which are subject to cocaine's influence. The researchers will measure the activity of limbic neurons of cocaine-treated animals demonstrated to be behaviorally-sensitized to determine whether alterations in their sensitivity to monoamines have occurred. ,