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NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 9, No. 4, April 1981
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NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 9, No. 4, April 1981 - Page 7. April 1981. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 18, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4899/show/4887.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(April 1981). NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 9, No. 4, April 1981 - Page 7. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4899/show/4887

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 9, No. 4, April 1981 - Page 7, April 1981, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 18, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4899/show/4887.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 9, No. 4, April 1981
Publisher National Organization for Women, Bay Area Chapter
Date April 1981
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • National Organization for Women
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .N682
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332563~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
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Title Page 7
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Transcript Feminists Identify with Religion byBRENDA DICKERSON Politicians and clergy, lobbyists and laity have agreed that the powerful Religious Right, often called the Moral Majority was a principle element in the election of Ronald Reagan and the conservative members of Congress. Members of the Texas chapter of the National Organization of Women (NOW) agree with them. That is why the Women and Religion Task Force was recently reactivated in Texas. The task force will monitor the activities of the religious right wing in Texas and demand equal media time when religious activists criticize feminist aims. • Another object of the task force is to improve the negative image many people hold of feminists. "Opponents have painted a picture ot NOW members and feminists in general as heathen harlots," says Sandy Warren of Houston, the task force's newly appointed chair. "This simply is not true," she continues. "Many of our members and other feminists are just as active in their organized religions, including some of fundamentalist faiths as they are in the women's movement. Our membership includes several women ministers." Goals of the task force are to expose the politics of religion and who benefits from it promote religious understanding amonc, its own (NOW) members and the general public, develop aids to help feminists work within their own religions, provide guides for the recruitment of members of all faiths into NOW, disseminate informa- V C>^"~ M M w Sandy Warren tlon on feminist religious issues, work witn organized religions and religious groups that are on record as supporting t.ie same issues and ' conduct religious feminist workshops. In addition, the task force will offer information on alternative religions, mystical and spiritual organizations and philosophies for women who have felt a need for a spiritual outlet with a belief in a higner power, out who have been turned off by the sexism in many organized religions and esoterical groups. %, "This is not to say we will promote participation in cults like that of Jim Jones," Warren stresses. "We will however, collect information on detrimentai cults and such for our own protection." Warren has been b. the women's movement since 1969, but didn't join NOW until 1975. She had two stints in the Navy and at one time spent a veat at Guanianimo Base in Cuba as one of the few women stationed there. She has also been a journalist in Colombia, Missouri and her hometown of Longview, Texas. When she . was discharged from the Navy in Norfolk, Virginia (where she first joined NOW), she spent a summer working at the Association for Research and Enlightenment/The Edgar Cayce Foundation at nearby Virginia Beach. She also took a corres ponde nee course from the Arcane School which is located in the United Nations Building ("It's not a religion, ifs more of a philosophy," she says.) Not all her religious experience has been esoterical, however. She spent her earlv v,M..Jhoou mi a Day list church and still has the Bible she received for perfect attendance at Vacation Rible School. Her teen years were spent attending a Methodist church, and she has visited Seventh Day Adventist, Catholic, and Episcopal churches. She was baptized in a Southern Baptist Church in her early thirties, but now belongs to no one organized religion. Ml think because I'm not a member of any organized religion, I'll do a bek ter job (as chair of the task force), snesays. Her involvement and ultimate volunteering to chair the Women and' Religion Task Force came not only from her study of * various religions and ^her membership in * NOW,: but from reading a two part article Dy Gloria Steinam who compared the ultra-reiigious jjght of America with 4he Nazis of Germany. £l"he article, called £Nazi Connection" appeared in October and November issues of ws. magazine.) • - p "This (article) has ter- Irjfied a lot of feminists." jWarrensaid. * ■ u Warren considers herself a moderate ifeminist, but concedes that many factions* such as the religious right would see her as a radical because she believes in gay rights, reproductive rights and ERA. Her own view of a radical feminist is "one who believes in violent overthrow of the government to achieve their goals, hates men and would like to see them all disposed of." As to Warren's view of God, she has this to say, "I think of God as a higher power, a cosmic consciousness." Sandy Warren was glad, and a little surprised to find many NOW members are active in their religions. She's eager to meet many of them and discuss any conflicts they may have encountered by being active in both areas. In conclusion, she says, "The more I study and keep up with current events, the more inseparable religion and politics appear." The Journal January 29,1981 Page 9