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NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 10, [No. 3], March 1982
Page 4
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NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 10, [No. 3], March 1982 - Page 4. March 1982. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 10, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4846/show/4839.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(March 1982). NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 10, [No. 3], March 1982 - Page 4. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4846/show/4839

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 10, [No. 3], March 1982 - Page 4, March 1982, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 10, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4846/show/4839.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 10, [No. 3], March 1982
Publisher National Organization for Women, Bay Area Chapter
Date March 1982
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • National Organization for Women
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location HQ1101 .N682
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332563~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
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Title Page 4
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File Name femin_201109_250d.jpg
Transcript 6 Montrose Voice / February 5,1982 "Women in the News: Media Images" Stop anti-gay Hysteria, says NOW Saturday, March 6th WASHINGTON—An officer of the National Organization for Women accused the Moral Majority and Christian Voice of "inciting mass hysteria" in opposing a bill to ban discrimination against homosexuals, reported UPI. But the chairman of the National Pro- Li fe Coalition, Connaught Marshner, said that homosexuality "is a point on which our ecripturea are clear, and we will never change our minds." Both women presented sharply conflicting testimony at a House Education and Labor Subcommittee hearing on a bill sponsored by Rep. Ted Weiae (D-N.Y.) to amend the 1964 Civil Righta Act to prohibit discrimination against gay people. Jane Wella-Schooley, NOW vice- president, said she got her information about hysteria from a Christian Voice mailing that says: "Thousands of innocent American children may soon be molested by sex deviates—if Congress votes for a proposed civil rights law now being considered—including precious Christian children in your Sunday school." She also quoted the Rev. Jerry Falwell of the Moral Majority organization as saying in a mailing: "Does the law protect drug pushers? Does the law protect bootleggers? Why then should the law all of a sudden etart protecting militant homosexuals who want to flaunt their perverted lifestyles in our faces?" Wells-Bchooley said she believes such tactics "are used to incite hatred and fear19 and for "inciting mass hysteria." Congressman Weiss said, "You have to conclude what they're doing is deliberately distorting the situation for the pur* pose of raising money." Marshner, on the other hand, said, "W* are not urging employers be forbidden to hire homosexuals. ... What we ate adw eating is our right to privacy be respected; that the homosexual lifestyle not be flaunted in our neighborhood and shouted from the housetops." 9:30 - 12:30 gym -.Women's Center Four Chelsea • Houston, Texas 77006 713/528-6798 Women suffering gap in benefits of Social Security WASHINGTON (AP) - The gap in yearly Social Security benefits for retired men and women will persist into the middle of the next century, with women on the average receiving only two-thirds of what men get, a new study projects. In the year 2050, the study projects, women will receive an average of $153,- 503, about 66 percent of the male average of $231,895. In terms of today's buying power, the study said, that would be about $12,141 for men and $8,037 for women. Newly retired females last year received an average of $3,629 in Social Security benefits, only 65 percent of what men received on the average, $5,595. More women are in the workforce earning Social Security benefits on their own these days, but a majority still get larger benefits based on their husbands' ! accounts than on their own. In the future, more women will get i Social Security in their own right, but their average benefit still will trail what men receive because many of the women will work only intermittently and at low wages, the author of the study said. The new projections appear in the January issue of the Social Security Bulletin. Steven McKay, a Social Security actuary, used the work histories of 1,378 beneficiaries in 1977 to project what workers will draw from the system in the next 75 years. McKay said in an interview Wednesday the proportion between average benefits for males and females "stays about the same. A lot of people were expecting them to close somewhat. They didn't. Rep. Mary Rose Oakar, D-Ohio, who chairs a House aging committee task force on Social Security and women, said, "For women, it's not going to get any better. There's no current commitment to correct the problems." "We just feel very, very strongly that the poorest people in this country are women 65 and over and they'll be even poorer in the year 2050," she said in an interview. McKay said none of his projections is definite. "We don't want to say definitely that women's benefits are not going to go up as fast as men." But the projections are based on the intermediate economic assumptions used by Social Security's trustees to project how much the system will pay out over the next 75 years. That scenario calls for inflation to decline to a con- statnt 4 percent per year in 1990 and ther?after and wages to rise at 5.5 percent per year. Judy Goldsmith, vice president of the National Organization for Women, called the projections "shocking" and claimed the pay gap will never close unless the Equal Rights Amendment is ratified. More than half of all women work outside the home today, compared with 27 percent in 1940. Social Security treats the earnings of male and female workers the same, but women on the average earn only 60 cents for each dollar earned by men.