Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Broadside-Herizons Coalition, April 1981
Page 8
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Broadside-Herizons Coalition, April 1981 - Page 8. April 1981. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 24, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4764/show/4755.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(April 1981). Broadside-Herizons Coalition, April 1981 - Page 8. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4764/show/4755

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Broadside-Herizons Coalition, April 1981 - Page 8, April 1981, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 24, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4764/show/4755.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Broadside-Herizons Coalition, April 1981
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
Date April 1981
Publisher National Organization for Women. Houston Chapter; Coalition of Greater Houston National Organization for Women Chapters
Description Broadside, Vol. 12, No. 4; Herizons, Vol. 6, No. 4
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Political activity
  • Feminism
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location HQ1439 .H68 B75
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b3767173~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Item Description
Title Page 8
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_009h.jpg
Transcript Page 8 BROADSIDE/HERIZONS April, 1981 ****************** is THERE LIFE AFTER HLA? ************** DATE: 37 A,B. {That's After Blast. We are virtually beginning the world anew since the Blast. I judge the year to be about Ano Domini 2050. The Blast wiped out the planet as our grandmothers knew it. My name is Luna, daughter of Muna; I am an educator. My job Is to help our new world avoid some of the failings of society which led ultimately to the destruction of most of humankind. Some oh these failings were revealed to me recently in some papers I discovered rolled up very tightly and shoved in a crevice in a huge old oak tree, one oh the few plants to survive the Blast.) THE PAPERS: It's 1990—a hot July afternoon. The HLA has been in effect several years now. It was passed out of the Conservative Congress in late 1982, and ratified by the required thirty-eight states by mid-1984. Big Brother has truly come to America. The same Congress allowed the ERA to die when it was not ratified by the June 30, 1982, deadline. We haven't been able to even try to resubmit the ERA since we We been here on the reservation. I guess we'll never get it now. In late 1984, to implement the HLA, Congress passed a series of laws, one of which was to place all women of child-bearing capabilities on these reservations where we are observed to insure that we use no contraband birth control, that we attempt no abortions. Sure, some women at first got doctors to sign papers declaring that they were infertile, and managed to stay off the reservation for a time, but some of them lost their lives when they accidentally got pregnant and tried to get abortions; the women were given the death penalty (also reinstated by Congress), and the doctors were given long jail sentences. So they're pretty much putting all women between the ages of 13 and 50 on the reservation. How could our rights be violated so blatantly, you might ask? Don't worry—the first of us to be sent here took it to the Supreme Court—which decided (based on precedent such as denying women the right to vote in 1872, denying women equal treatment under the law in labor cases, education cases, jury cases, and the Summer, 1981, decision in which they stated that women are outside the Constitution when it comes to defending the country) that women basically are not protected by the Constitution in its unamended form, except for our right to vote, and therefore, Congress was not violating the Constitution by sending us here. Oh yes, they still have to let us vote, but it doesn't mean much. We can't form any kind of bloc, because women are no longer allowed to meet in groups of more than three, and we're not allowed to write or distribute any materials which do not "affirm woman's proper role of wife and mother," as the legislation reads. Some woman managed to get these new laws to the Supreme Court, too, which decided the Constitutional guarantees of freedom of assembly and freedom of speech do not apply to women.