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University News, Vol. 1, No. 7, December 1981
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University News, Vol. 1, No. 7, December 1981 - Page 5. December 1981. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 20, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4747/show/4745.

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(December 1981). University News, Vol. 1, No. 7, December 1981 - Page 5. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4747/show/4745

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

University News, Vol. 1, No. 7, December 1981 - Page 5, December 1981, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 20, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/4747/show/4745.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title University News, Vol. 1, No. 7, December 1981
Publisher National Organization for Women, University of Houston Chapter.
Date December 1981
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Women--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • National Organization for Women
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location HQ1101 .N684
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1476015~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
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Title Page 5
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File Name femin_201109_234e.jpg
Transcript All but war on women The following article is excerpted from the speech given by Rep. Schroeder at the National NOW conference Washington D.C. in by Patricia Schroeder RONALD REAGAN was the only major president tiai candidate in the last two elections to oppose the Equal Rights Amendment. While insisting that he supported equal rights for women ("little H 'e' " and "little 4r' ")t he said that the ERA was not needed because he would push for legislation to advance these rights. • * To back up that promise, he issued a "white paper,' which stated thai he "supports the enforce- w Hep Schroeder. D-Coh.. is co-chairwoman of the Congresswomen s Caucus. ment of all equal-opportunity laws, and urges the. elimination of discrimination against women .. . land) therefore pledges vigorous en-"- forcement of laws to assure equal treatment in job recruitment, hiring, promotion, pay, credit, moru gage access and housing." But. in his nine months in office, the president riot only has failed to make good on his campaign promise, he also has moved in precisely the opposite direction. The only exception has been his appoint-" ment of Sandra D. O'Connor to the U.S.* Supreme . Court, in fulfillment of another campaign pledge. It is clear that Reagan is actively opposed to programs designed to further or protect women's", rights, and that his administration has all but declared war on women. Here is what the Reagan record shows: , JV • Economics: Earlier this year, the president-"- sought the elimination of the $122 minimum benefit for recipients of Social Security, a proposal that, would have had a disproportionate effect on women. * All but 700.000 of the persons who receive mmimunr- benefits are women. The proposal was withdrawn after a storm of protest. The economic package that Reagan pushed through Congress last summer reduced or eliminat-" ed benefits for nearly three-quarters of a million' recipients of Aid to Families with Dependent Children and prohibited AFDC recipients from owning, . more than $1,000 worth of assets, half the amountV previously allowed. Work incentives have been" eliminated: consequently, poor women will be forced to choose between keeping their jobs and losing.- needed additional income or quitting to go on we)-. fare and thereby increase their income. (Eighty percent of ail AFDC recipients live in householdsr * headed by women \ • Sex discrimination: The Justice Department has abandoned the use of any numerical or statist!-. cal formulas in connection with affirmative action,, thereby rendering equal-employment goalc (for minorities as well as women> meaningless. The, Labor Department has proposed reducing by 75 percent the number of companies that must make ■ written reports and outline recruitment procedures; as a result, most federal contractors will have less, incentive to hire and promote women. In a move apparently aimed at weakening the Labor Department's Women's Bureau, the primary . office charged with promoting equal opportunity for., women in the job market, its staff was reduced 28 percent. By contrast, across-the-board staff reductions in the department amounted to only 5.5 percent. Similarly. Reagan has left vacant three of the-" five seats on the Equal Employment Opportunity.: Commission, the chief federal enforcer of Title 7 of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which prohibits dis-* crimination in employment. The commission, without its quorum, is limited in the action it can- take. At the same time, the Justice Department is seriously considering abolishing class-action dis— crimination suits. Other Reagan administration proposals would affect Title 9 of the Education Amendments Act of 1972, which bans sex discrimination in schools that receive federal aid. The Education Department has proposed narrowing the scope of Title 9 to specific programs receiving direct federal aid: these account for only 4 percent of the $13 billion in federal funds spent on schools. Vice President George Bush announced in August that his Task Force on Regulatory Relief has targeted for review the regulations that protect women from sexual harassment and discrimination in college athletics. • Appointments: Here the presidents record is notning short of dismal. Only 44 of the 398 top-levej; appointments have gone to women. And the appointments have reflected Reagan's attitudes toward women. For example, Anne M. Gorsuch. head of the Environmental Protection Agency, is well-known tci women's groups for her efforts while serving in the Colorado Legislature to dismantle the state Commission on Women. For jobs with particular significance for women, the president named Rex Lee, a leading opponent of the ERA. as solicitor general and Dr. C. Everett Koop, an active opponent Of abortion, as surgeon general. Another appointee. Donald J. Devine, director of the Office of Personnel Management, eliminated abortion coverage from all federal employee health-insurance plans. fThe decision was struck down by a US. district court but is being appealed; meanwhile. Devine has agreed to permit coverage for abortions in a small percentage of the plans. I The president has yet to appoint a single woman to the federal district or circuit bench or to fill the White House post that oversees the intergovernmental Task Force on Women. One may quibble with some of these examples. Not every program, just because it seems beneficial to women, is worth maintaining. We need to scrutinize all federal spending as we try to balance the budget. But there's no question that President Reagan, instead of fulfilling his campaign promise, is moving to weaken, cut back or abolish just about every federal program, law or office designed to advance women. • Emotions playing big role in ERA* UT study shows By JUDITH CURTIS American-Statesman Staff It could be that emotionalism is keeping Americans from approving the Equal Rights Amendment. That is a conclusion suggested by a recent UT study indicating as long as students didn't know it was the ERA they were reading about, they liked it. But once they realv ized it was the ERA, an acronym that often raises the hackles and blood pressure, their approval rate dropped. Robert P. Leone, an assistant professor of marketing at the University of Texas, conducted a four-week survey last April along with graduate student Mary Gam. as part of a marketing research course. The results were released this fall. Most surprising to Leone after reading the survey results was that "once they had the information, in most cases people changed their minds in favor of the ERA." - The survey questioned 391 UT students, split 50-50 between men and women. When the statement, "I believe we need the ERA and I hope it is ratified," was posed to the students, 51 percent of the males agreed, and 66 percent of the females agreed. Reagan's Position Excerpted from Remarks of the President on his Fifty States Project for Women. 4J P 4> -P ■O OJ «. jC <0 XX M >>J2 T3 P JZ *4J p o oj c y c p vi h <o p «j <o c c««-» u tl g*H IOC o <tj <u G c o CD u in •H P 0> XZ <A - 41 > P 3 c o> o XZ O O P 4) -H 4> •O P JG C Tf 3 -P 3 C Q W tf XI TJ •H tf C £ >. < tf C %4 TJ 0 0 O -H • P P u p at u h a» 0 O O P P -Q lieuui O 4) 4» £ P .. f QUMPt<" h cc a £ £ w c P CL 0 TJ 4> 4) --• O »u(flH(d u >,«i;uH3 D<v ch n a; c n^ tf C > -«j -H -H .A tf Ul J_J C h a* £ 3: TJ « ♦> 4J »i o» •O H T) > U 41 "4 •* g C CO P 4* P C O CL W '£ -H O tftfOP-<0CX H ^ P > U) H3 C M 4) U» t/J HW»0>i - • » * p p T* .HPP4>P|-LC>i - 3 p - > 4) tf 4> rH O CiOH M EC 3 O *0 jC O h • P r* »E ) «*J 3 3 W» O 3 4-» C O D>0 U(OJ3*M M 41 >- C 3 H O 4> E •H P tf O >, • OM • t* o CU en O) u -l oi c - »-i O jCOO'H-H'OOi —t V) CP.C Q> P D 4) C E nt n at c u 4></)4>.Qrt:a> 4>E3-HH.4>C£<no* C •O 4> O* C >00-HMr-H 3 -H p O trt <0 <H • +J_Q<Q<Q • C IA UIjCO) >iTJ <oo £</>a> -p-o^Ec 4)MW4)-hE>i3C O«0 u a <tj Mx:o-PcQ<Di->a)c C7» 30+J34J E«J_COC 4) *m 4) O JZ u O O «0jC4» CPM — 36- 0)H *JH0)O«JQ«» * P oi 4JE JC U & £>t«TJ - >HX:OTJ4JH 4IC • fliJH 0» O 4-» CO 4) H +J H 3 U U *H u *j T3 *> s: o. o o^r-i c 4)4>4»CCHCCPtflCO«0H ££M4l(|i033tl U Q) 6- o O oj £ <n tj u <p cux: *o m *m A £ C ^)T3jC 41 4» O 4» 41 w*0 D»0 *0 3 U -Q 4> U X £ <0-HH C 41 > U E C H >O^AJO 4» P CO^» O C XZ 0> • M »04JC C 0 (O'O-H'OC-CO-iO «H*0 H *H -M U>UTJ U «M HtDifl 13 4» -H <U C W_i 3 M W 4) M to 4)E •HOO«0 PC- WMP, o x m .c <u «u o a> a> p o oj m aua wi >,.c £ £ 3 «/> o *o «« w o 3 E :>- 4) 4) M at O 4J u 4> C • C P O P C 4) H H 3 , HE'O+i^Q+j'UCO* O -H ■-! O O 3 >t 5 a» to P P P 10 TO > O P U «M «u'u- aco4>ow 4> 4> M O «m M 4> MP CO*P4lrOP HCfO*H 4IX:3<0 *0 H C 4» OP OfOC^PO/PO. <D Q, 4» P 3 P CL 4> (X C £ O 10 TJ C «d O O T> >i«l P h 3 C »m £ —t P I44>P <0 O « P H • > «0 XJ ' jS «0 C »H>- m 41 Q*P *JHD 4> P -H H p 3 4) J M^r (0"M U 4> > -H H W CU O -P J-5 » C"H P P P 3PP4fl»«>>^P OflgS'OHCflC >,«m T3 tr <o ja <o a o « 4l d £ (A.o a*-H a) E w « U) 41 U U - P _C <0 «M <0 • H -H * cpp <-♦ o »h c w tfl C CL Cm O TJ ** ■** V >, J) -H C 3 4) 10 0 p -H P 10 C E££ «-• -h C p o»p a • o CCPPPCP4»JC ■h 41 o o tr A 3 G J O 4» P «m OP aj_i x: y-t a) a» p p a p oj jc m p o A 4) h <o o w c > W 4) «M H C P-CC C £ O- opop •a»a>pu • "*-io-h >t£o. -a» >,p a> p o p no w «> -H _3 -r4 3 3 ^) 3 <PCACrH o «o»a <0O"-*-H4IU2~H'H js O.P Xi tn o-d o. P C -h 4) 3 G C Q* howgo»-^'0< 41 O C P C W "—■ W > O *HJ a»aia»a4>i4i-H » c h 3 wi ^j a» p • H 11 4i 3 o P 4J_CPP4>P CP « <j» «o *o tj a p 0>H-CH^ lOaC o w o £ J3 P O E U >»*h (j But in another set of questions, Garza and Leone decided to print the House of Representataives bill which seeks to eliminate discrimination on the basis of sex, and avoid any mention of the ERA specifically, "to take away the emotional aspects of people's perceptions of the ERA," said Leone. So, when asked if they would approve a constitutional amendment barring sex discrimination, 62 percent of the males surveyed, and 68 percent of the females said they would. Apparently, said Leone, "Any time there's any debate i on the topic (of ERA), it immediately becomes emotional," said Leone. Without the ERA acronym involved in the discussion, respondents are tar more accepting of the goals of the amendment, said Leone. And once given the facts about the controversial amendment, survey participants showed a readiness to support the ERA. ; For instance, Leone said, respondents showed less inclination to support the amendment until they were told ERA will have nothing to do with the legality of abortions. Upon learning it has nothing to do with that particular issue, their support for the ERA increased, he said. Leone said he has sent copies of the 100-page report to the National Organization of Women which is seeking ratification of the amendment. ERA supporters have until June 1982 to raise the current 35 states to the required 38 states ratifying the ERA for final passage. A NOW official in Los Angeles, where Leone sent his report, said it "looked very interesting" but she and others within the organization hadn't read the survey results.