Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
The Wand, Vol. 6, No. 12, December 1990
Page 3
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
The Wand, Vol. 6, No. 12, December 1990 - Page 3. December 1990. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 23, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/465/show/458.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(December 1990). The Wand, Vol. 6, No. 12, December 1990 - Page 3. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/465/show/458

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Wand, Vol. 6, No. 12, December 1990 - Page 3, December 1990, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 23, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/465/show/458.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title The Wand, Vol. 6, No. 12, December 1990
Publisher Womynspace
Date December 1990
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
  • Feminists--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
  • Lesbians--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .W35
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b3634790~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
Item Description
Title Page 3
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_448c.jpg
Transcript THE BIRTH OF INKLINGS In the 1970s, Houston's feminist bookstore was The Bookstore on Bissonnet. Then, in the 1980s, there were several gay or lesbian stores: Wilde & Stein Books, B.D. & Daughter, then Wit & Wisdom. Then, in April, 1988, there were none. Soon after, over lunch at Treebeard's Restaurant, long-time Houston activists Pokey Anderson and Annise Parker were lamenting the vacuum. They refused to believe that Houston's gay/lesbian/feminist community couldn't--or wouldn't-- support a bookstore. At the time, Pokey had been a legal secretary for nine years for one of the city's largest law firms; Annise was in her eighth year with Mosbacher Energy Company, an independent oil & gas company. They were looking for new challenges, and they tackled the idea of a bookstore head-on. Before it was reality, they were to fill five notebooks with notes, write a 40-page business plan, and compile an 650-page list of potential books to carry. Annise and Pokey interviewed the people who had run the previous four bookstores in Houston to find out what had worked, and what hadn't. They visited other bookstores in the area. They received invaluable advice from Barbara Grier of Naiad Press, Carol Seajay of Feminist Bookstore News, and numerous others around the country. They questioned authors, wholesalers, publishers, and consumers. They joined the American Booksellers Association, and contacted Houston's Small Business Development Council. They created maps of the targeted Montrose area, and compiled general and specific economic data. They met with an accountant and a lawyer. They set up a management plan, with Pokey to quit her downtown job soon after the store opened, while Annise would keep her same job. The store needed a name. Pokey and Annise brainstormed, coming up with separate lists of any name they could think of. After crossing out dozens of names, eight survived. They wrote these names on flash- cards, snagged anyone they could, and asked them to rate the names, and comment on their reactions. You already know the winner: Inklings. Pokey and Annise set up a budget. One advisor warned they would need a minimum of $20,000 to start. Another advised not to bother without $125,000 as a bare minimum. Within these rather broad parameters, a budget and cash flow projections were drawn up. Pokey and Annise put in equal amounts in the partnership. Additional amounts, in increments of $1,000, were loaned by friends and lovers who believed in the project. In September, 1988, a bank account was opened, and Inklings began to establish credit relationships with suppliers. Commercial credit is like a lot of other things--you have to already have it to get it. Fortunately, Barbara Grier was willing to grant immediate credit, and two other companies Pokey had worked with as a music producer were willing to be references. Inklings started placing tiny orders to get started, and first set books out at a table in front of Bacchus during a Womynspace garage sale. Initial response was quite positive, and this also was the beginning of a mutually rewarding relationship with Womynspace. Meanwhile, Pokey and Annise had been scouring the chosen sector of Montrose for a place to rent since July. A well-known marketing analyst--who happened to be a lesbian--knew the target neighborhood like the back of her hand, and steered Inklings away from lackluster locations. Three places fell through before they finally found a site that was the right size, with parking, visibility, affordable, and with owners that wouldn't flinch at the words "feminist" or "gay and lesbian." One master's level psychologist, when told it would be a feminist bookstore, responded pertly, "Oh, that's wonderful! A feminine bookstore!" Pokey noted, "We occasionally wondered whether we'd been beamed back in time as we tried to explain this alien concept to Houston's property owners." Finally, on November 15, Inklings signed a lease at 1846 Richmond, a building with a rather checkered past. It was then a flower shop, but for about 18 years before that it was Club Diablo, a place where, neighbors told us, anything went. The floor and bar area had been spatter-painted hot pink, gray and black. The walls had 18 mirrors. And, there were several spent bullets discovered in the mantel. An opening date was set 18 days hence, and Hazelwitch's mailing list was borrowed to alert the town. A stalwart crew of volunteers and professionals set to work remodeling the entire downstairs. Pokey met with a lesbian interior designer and supervised the crews, even though she was still working her full-time job downtown. Annise had to leave town due a death in her family, but was back in time for the marathon book-shelving the night before opening day. Other stores, which could have viewed us as unwelcome competitors, welcomed Inklings with open arms: Lucia's Garden delivered a free counter (along with a continuing stream of good advice), and Lobo sent best wishes and flowers. But the customers' response was the best: Inklings was welcomed into the world by an enthusiastic crowd which swooped up 1/3 of the stock on the first day. Now, celebrating the end of the first two years, Inklings can look back at all that has been learned, and hope that the existence of Inklings has made a difference in the lives of individuals and the community as a whole. Inklings looks forward to serving the community for many more years.