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Pointblank Times, Vol. 1, No. 3, May 1975
Page 15
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Pointblank Times, Vol. 1, No. 3, May 1975 - Page 15. May 1975. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. February 27, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/46/show/44.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(May 1975). Pointblank Times, Vol. 1, No. 3, May 1975 - Page 15. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/46/show/44

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Pointblank Times, Vol. 1, No. 3, May 1975 - Page 15, May 1975, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed February 27, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/46/show/44.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Pointblank Times, Vol. 1, No. 3, May 1975
Date May 1975
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Women--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
  • Lesbianism--United States--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Lesbians--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ75 .P64
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b3767189~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 15
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  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_407o.jpg
Transcript After dismissing the left, Alpert's article then proposed, in lieu of her formerly held Marxian theories of oppression of economic classes, an eclectic theory of Mother Right—that is oppression on the basis of motherhood. Alpert concludes the article looking forward to the resumption of the worship of the mother principle similar to the goddess worship of ancient religions. Reaction of the women's movement to the article The publication of this article incited immediate responses among women. Some replies affirmed her analysis of the left. However, replies from women in the underground were at first dubious of the authenticity of the article. According to them, the author had given inaccurate information about the leaders of the Weatherunderground and had included the real name of one of its members—information inaccessible to Alpert who knew only the revolutionary pseudonym of the member. His real name was used only by prison authorities. Cooperation with federal authorities The debate over the article's authenticity was ended in November 1974 when Jane Alpert turned herself in to federal authorities. She publicly claimed credit for the article and the theory of Mother Right. Under federal custody she then used her new found feminism as a carte blanche to remorselessly collaborate with the FBI, in the words of her lawyer to "cooperate fully" in giving the Bureau information about the underground. Soon after Alpert's collaboration with the FBI, Pat Swinton, an underground compatriot of Alpert's who had been charged with her in 1970, was located and arrested. Swinton's lawyer stated that Alpert knew many details of her client's underground existence. The controversy The reactions in the women's movement were extreme. Three petitions were soon circulating with numerous signers. One states that "anyone who reveals such information acts in the same manner as an agent of the State," that no movement can survive with betrayals such as Alpert's, and that she therefore should not be welcomed into the feminist movement. The second petition states that Alpert's denial of Attica is essentially a denial of the feminist movement, and that we must choose whether the women's movement is to be based on white and class privelege as represented by Alpert or whether it is a struggle which supports and identifies with other oppressed peoples. The third states that no one group of women has the right to determine what is or is not "true feminism," that is, that feminism has no theoretical basis which one can place oneself outside of. Therefore, Alpert's brand is as good as anyone else's. Alpert meanwhile, in exchange for her collaboration, received only 27 months in a minimal security prison with eligibility for parole in nine months. She is presently in prison doing research on goddess worship. The lines of the controversy of support or nonsupport for Alpert are drawn around the basic issue of: should the women's movement align itself with the struggles of other peoples—blacks, working class, political prisoners, or should it isolate itself and work against these struggles, as in cooperating with law enforcement institutions if it were advantageous to the women's movement or its individual members to do so. M. Pipkin 15