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Pointblank Times, Vol. 1, No. 3, May 1975
Page 14
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Pointblank Times, Vol. 1, No. 3, May 1975 - Page 14. May 1975. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 4, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/46/show/43.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(May 1975). Pointblank Times, Vol. 1, No. 3, May 1975 - Page 14. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/46/show/43

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Pointblank Times, Vol. 1, No. 3, May 1975 - Page 14, May 1975, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 4, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/46/show/43.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Pointblank Times, Vol. 1, No. 3, May 1975
Date May 1975
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Women--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
  • Lesbianism--United States--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Lesbians--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ75 .P64
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b3767189~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 14
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  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_407n.jpg
Transcript ALPERT CONTROVERSY Due to the controversy she has sparked in many recent women's publications, and the petitions drawn up in reaction to her actions, the case of Jane Alpert bears examining more closely. The daughter of comfortably middle-class parents, Jane Alpert graduated with honors from Swarthmore College. When she met Sam Melville, an ultra-leftist, in 1968, she was a second year graduate student at Columbia and held a part-time job as an editor on the Cambridge University Press. Alpert became sexually and emotionally involved with Melville, quit her job and graduate studies, and threw herself into the politics of her new lover. Alpert never belonged to any left organization; thus most of her contact with the organized left was contingent upon her relationship with Melville, although she did work on the all-female leftist paper RAT for a period. In 1970 she, with Melville and two others, was arrested and charged with bombing eight government and corporate office buildings in New York. She pleaded guilty to conspiracy, jumped bail, and disappeared into the underground. Melville stayed and was sentenced to 18 years in prison. In the underground At this point the romantic life of the revolutionary turned to the lonely tedium of the underground for Alpert—transient jobs, no friends, false identities, and political isolation. She lost all contact with fellow leftists. Her only real relationships were with a women's consciousness-raising group, which gave her a sense of community before she had to move on to another city. * In September 1971 Sam Melville was killed in the Attica prison revolt. A posthumous collection of his prison letters was made and Alpert wrote the eulogistic preface, gushing over "his great gift for making the most of small pleasures and nis innate strength." Condemnation of left and theory of mother right She made an abrupt reversal of this sentiment in May 1973 when a letter and article signed by Alpert were delivered to the women's publication, OFF OUR BACKS. The article traced Alpert's change from ultra-leftism to feminism and unqualitatively condemned the left as a group of male supremacists. Using her former lover, Melville, as typical of the left, Alpert claimed he intimidated her into participating in the bombings and that her political ideas of the time were the result of his emotional manipulation^of her. She went on to describe a domestic life with Melville in which she performed all the household labor, cooking, dishwashing, etc., and in which he could make love to her only if he fantasized her a prostitute. Inductively Alpert claimed that this was the caliber of all male leftists--they were all male supremacists. Consequently, in speaking of Attica, she declared that she "mourned the loss of 42 male supremacists no longer." To further illustrate the sexism of the left, Alpert cited that the Weathermen were controlled by a council of five, only one of which was a woman. She included several other examples of the personal sexism of individual members of the underground and in doing so included names, places, living habits, and other pertinent details which jeopardized the safety of both her sisters and brothers in the underground. Then she exhorted her sisters of the left and in the underground to follow her example and leave the male-dominated left and join the feminist movement. « 14